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  1.  76
    F. M. Kamm (2007). Intricate Ethics: Rights, Responsibilities, and Permissible Harm. New York ;Oxford University Press.
    In Intricate Ethics, Kamm questions the moral importance of some non-consequentialist distinctions and then introduces and argues for the moral importance of ...
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  2. F. M. Kamm (2009). Neuroscience and Moral Reasoning: A Note on Recent Research. Philosophy and Public Affairs 37 (4):330-345.
  3.  4
    F. M. Kamm (2014). Bioethical Prescriptions: To Create, End, Choose, and Improve Lives. OUP Usa.
    Bioethical Prescriptions collects F.M. Kamm's articles on bioethics -- revised for publication in book form -- which have appeared over the last 25 years and which have made her among the most widely-respected philosophers working in this field.
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  4.  90
    F. M. Kamm (2015). Cost Effectiveness Analysis and Fairness. Journal of Practical Ethics 3 (1):1-14.
    This article considers some different views of fairness and whether they conflict with the use of a version of Cost Effectiveness Analysis (CEA) that calls for maximizing health benefits per dollar spent. Among the concerns addressed are whether this version of CEA ignores the concerns of the worst off and inappropriately aggregates small benefits to many people. I critically examine the views of Daniel Hausman and Peter Singer who defend this version of CEA and Eric Nord among others who criticize (...)
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  5. F. M. Kamm (2003). Rescuing Ivan Ilych: How We Live and How We Die. Ethics 113 (2):202-233.
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  6. F. M. Kamm (1998). Moral Intuitions, Cognitive Psychology, and the Harming-Versus-Not-Aiding Distinction. Ethics 108 (3):463-488.
  7. F. M. Kamm (1989). Harming Some to Save Others. Philosophical Studies 57 (3):227 - 260.
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  8.  18
    F. M. Kamm (1998). Morality, Mortality: Volume I: Death and Whom to Save From It. OUP Usa.
    Why is death bad for us, even on the assumption that it involves the absence of experience? Whom should we save from death if we cannot save everyone? Kamm considers these questions, critically examining some answers other philosophers have given. She also examines specifically what differences between persons are relevant to the distribution of any scarce resources, e.g. bodily organs for transplantation.
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  9. F. M. Kamm (1992). Creation and Abortion: A Study in Moral and Legal Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
    Based on a non-consequentialist ethical theory, this book critically examines the prevalent view that if a fetus has the moral standing of a person, it has a right to life and abortion is impermissible. Most discussion of abortion has assumed that this view is correct, and so has focused on the question of the personhood of the fetus. Kamm begins by considering in detail the permissibility of killing in non-abortion cases which are similar to abortion cases. She goes on to (...)
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  10.  78
    F. M. Kamm (1992). Review: Non-Consequentialism, the Person as an End-in-Itself, and the Significance of Status. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Public Affairs 21 (4):354 - 389.
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  11. F. M. Kamm (1996). Morality, Mortality: Volume Ii: Rights, Duties, and Status. OUP Usa.
    This volume continues the examination of issues of life and death which F.M. Kamm began in Morality, Mortality, Volume I . Kamm continues her development of a non-consequentialist ethical theory and its application to practical ethical problems. She looks at the distinction between killing and letting die, and between intending and foreseeing, and also at the concepts of rights, prerogatives, and supererogation. She shows that a sophisticated non-consequentialist theory can be modelled which copes convincingly with practical ethical issues, and throws (...)
     
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  12. F. M. Kamm (2005). Aggregation and Two Moral Methods. Utilitas 17 (1):1-23.
    I begin by reconsidering the arguments of John Taurek and Elizabeth Anscombe on whether the number of people we can help counts morally. I then consider arguments that numbers should count given by F. M. Kamm and Thomas Scanlon, and criticism of them by Michael Otsuka. I examine how different conceptions of the moral method known as pairwise comparison are at work in these different arguments and what the ideas of balancing and tie-breaking signify for decision-making in various types of (...)
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  13.  23
    F. M. Kamm (2002). Owing, Justifying, and Rejecting. [REVIEW] Mind 111 (442):323-354.
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  14. R. G. Frey, Brad Hooker, F. M. Kamm, Thomas E. Hill Jr, Geoffrey Sayre-McCord, David McNaughton, Jan Narveson, Michael Slote, Alison M. Jaggar & William R. Schroeder (2000). Normative Ethics. In Hugh LaFollette - (ed.), The Blackwell Guide to Ethical Theory. Blackwell Publishers
     
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  15.  93
    F. M. Kamm (2000). Does Distance Matter Morally to the Duty to Rescue. Law and Philosophy 19 (6):655 - 681.
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  16. F. M. Kamm (2004). Failures of Just War Theory: Terror, Harm, and Justice. Ethics 114 (4):650-692.
  17. F. M. Kamm (2007). Intricate Ethics: Rights, Responsibilities, and Permissable Harm. Oxford University Press Usa.
    "Reading F.M. Kamm's latest book is like watching a brilliant astronomer map an uncharted galaxy--the meticulousness and the display of mental stamina must inspire awe. There is a kind of beauty in the performance alone. Intricate Ethics is a major event in normative ethical theory by a living master of the subject.... In the end, professional moral philosophers cannot reasonably ignore Intricate Ethics.... Kamm continues to prove herself the most imaginative, detail-oriented deontologist writing in English today... Professor Kamm is in (...)
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  18. Judith Jarvis Thomson, Dan W. Brock, Paul J. Weithman, Gerald Dworkin, F. M. Kamm, J. David Velleman & Ezekiel J. Emanuel (1999). 10. Uma Narayan, Dislocating Cultures: Identities, Traditions, and Third World Feminism Uma Narayan, Dislocating Cultures: Identities, Traditions, and Third World Feminism (Pp. 668-671). [REVIEW] Ethics 109 (3).
     
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  19.  39
    F. M. Kamm (2008). Responses to Commentators on Intricate Ethics. Utilitas 20 (1):111-142.
    Some of the commentators on Intricate Ethics complain of my method. One finds the main ideas ‘Kammouflaged’ because the relevant causal distinctions are so fine-grained and the cases that illustrate them so numerous . Some say that they do not have the intuitions about many cases that I have, that I concoct dubious and ad hoc distinctions and invest them with moral significance; I am Ptolemaic in that new crystalline spheres and epicycles are constantly being added in an attempt to (...)
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  20.  31
    F. M. Kamm (2002). Genes, Justice, and Obligations to Future People. Social Philosophy and Policy 19 (2):360-388.
    In this essay, I shall discuss ethical issues that arise with our increasing ability to affect the genetic makeup of the human population. These effects can be produced directly by altering the genotype , or indirectly by aborting, not conceiving, or treating individuals because of their genetic makeup in ways made possible by genetic pharmacology. I shall refer to all of these sorts of procedures collectively as the Procedures. Some of the ethical issues the Procedures raise are old, arising quite (...)
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  21. F. M. Kamm (1999). Physician‐Assisted Suicide, the Doctrine of Double Effect, and the Ground of Value. Ethics 109 (3):586-605.
    In this article, I shall present three arguments for thc pcrmissibility 0f physician-assisted suicide (PAS), and then examine several objections 0f 21 "K21nti2m" and non-Kantian nature against them. These are really 0bjcctions against certain types of suicide. I shall focus 0n active PAS (eg., when 21 patient takes 21 lethal drug given by E1 physician, in which case both thc physician and patient are active). I shall assume the patient is 21 competent, responsible, rational agent, who gives his being in (...)
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  22.  5
    F. M. Kamm (2012). The Moral Target: Aiming at Right Conduct in War and Other Conflicts. OUP Usa.
    The Moral Target: Aiming at Right Conduct in War and Other Conflicts comprises essays that discuss aspects of war and other conflicts in the light of nonconsequentialist ethical theory. Topics include the relation between conditions that justify starting war and those that justify stopping it, the treatment of combatants and noncombatants in war, collaboration, justice after war and other conflicts, terrorism, resistance to communal injustice, and nuclear deterrence.
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  23. F. M. Kamm (1988). Why Is Death Bad and Worse Than Pre-Natal Non-Existence? Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 69 (2):161.
     
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  24.  17
    F. M. Kamm (1999). Rescue and Harm. Legal Theory 5 (1):1-44.
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  25.  47
    F. M. Kamm (2005). Terror and Collateral Damage: Are They Permissible? [REVIEW] Journal of Ethics 9 (3-4):381 - 401.
    This article begins by comparing terror and death and then focuses on whether killing combatants and noncombatants as a mere means to create terror, that is in turn a means to winning a war, is ever permissible. The role of intentions and alternative acts one might have done is examined in this regard. The second part of the article begins by criticizing a standard justification for causing collateral (side effect) deaths in war and offers an alternative justification that makes use (...)
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  26.  78
    F. M. Kamm (2011). Sen on Justice and Rights: A Review Essay. Philosophy and Public Affairs 39 (1):82-104.
  27.  30
    F. M. Kamm (1999). Responsibility and Collaboration. Philosophy and Public Affairs 28 (3):169–204.
    [Considers Bernard Williams on negative responsibility as exemplified by his well-known case of Jim and the Indians].
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  28. F. M. Kamm (2001). Ronald Dworkin on Abortion and Assisted Suicide. Journal of Ethics 5 (3):221-240.
    In the first part of this article, I raisequestions about Dworkin''s theory of theintrinsic value of life and about the adequacyof his proposal to understand abortion in termsof different ways of valuing life. In thesecond part of the article, I consider hisargument in ``The Philosophers'' Brief on AssistedSuicide'''', which claims that the distinctionbetween killing and letting die is morallyirrelevant, the distinction between intendingand foreseeing death can be morally relevantbut is not always so. I argue that thekilling/letting die distinction can be (...)
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  29.  65
    F. M. Kamm (1995). Inviolability. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 20 (1):165-175.
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  30.  24
    F. M. Kamm (2000). Justifications for Killing Noncombatants in War. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 24 (1):219–228.
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  31.  3
    F. M. Kamm (2016). The Trolley Problem and Aggression. Social Philosophy and Policy 32 (2):1-17.
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  32.  78
    F. M. Kamm (2005). Moral Status and Personal Identity: Clones, Embryos, and Future Generations. Social Philosophy and Policy 22 (2):283-307.
    In the first part of this article, I argue that even those entities that in their own right and for their own sake give us reason not to destroy them and to help them are sometimes substitutable for the good of other entities. In so arguing, I consider the idea of being valuable as an end in virtue of intrinsic and extrinsic properties. I also conclude that entities that have claims to things and against others are especially nonsubstitutable. In the (...)
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  33.  3
    F. M. Kamm (2001). Conflicts of Rights. Legal Theory 7 (3):239-255.
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  34.  67
    F. M. Kamm (2008). Terrorism and Intending Evil. Philosophy and Public Affairs 36 (2):157-186.
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  35.  20
    F. M. Kamm (2013). Trolley Problem. In Hugh LaFollette (ed.), The International Encyclopedia of Ethics. Wiley-Blackwell
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  36.  27
    F. M. Kamm (2001). Brain Death and Spontaneous Breathing. Philosophy and Public Affairs 30 (3):297–320.
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  37.  2
    F. M. Kamm & Margaret Pabst Battin (1995). Morality, Mortality: Death and Whom to Save From It. Law and Philosophy 14 (3):411-415.
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  38.  49
    F. M. Kamm (2009). Aggregation, Allocating Scarce Resources, and the Disabled. Social Philosophy and Policy 26 (1):148-197.
    In this article, I first compare positions I have taken in the past and those taken by Peter Singer on how the allocation of life-saving resources should be affected by (1) the aggregation of expected quality of life, quantity of life, and need, (2) both within the life of a person (intrapersonal aggregation) and across persons (interpersonal aggregation). I then reexamine the specific issue of whether and why differences in expected years of life and quality of life that a scarce (...)
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  39.  1
    F. M. Kamm (2005). Terror and Collateral Damage: Are They Permissible? Journal of Ethics 9 (3-4):381-401.
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  40.  6
    F. M. Kamm (2002). Review: Owing, Justifying, and Rejecting. [REVIEW] Mind 111 (442):323 - 354.
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  41.  22
    F. M. Kamm (1999). Living High and Letting Die. Philosophical Review 108 (2):300-305.
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  42.  26
    F. M. Kamm (1998). Grouping and the Imposition of Loss. Utilitas 10 (3):292-.
    In this article, I critically examine Peter Unger's arguments for the claim that there is a duty to cause physical harm to oneself and others in order to save lives. This includes discussion of his view that when the method of cases involves several rather than merely two options our intuitive judgements support his radical thesis. In conclusion, I consider his attempt to reconcile his claims with common sense moral judgements.
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  43. F. M. Kamm (2004). Rights. In Jules Coleman & Scott Shapiro (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Jurisprudence and Philosophy of Law. OUP Oxford
  44.  6
    F. M. Kamm (1996). Morality and Action by Warren Quinn. Journal of Philosophy 93 (11):578-584.
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  45.  24
    F. M. Kamm (1998). The Noble Warrior: Feminism, Contractarianism, and Self in the Light of Hampton. Philosophical Studies 89 (2-3):237-258.
  46. F. M. Kamm (2000). Collaboration and Responsibility. Philosophy and Public Affairs 28 (3):169-204.
  47. F. M. Kamm (1998). Morality, Mortality Vol. II: Rights, Duties, and Status. Mind 107 (426):492-498.
     
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  48.  7
    F. M. Kamm (2004). Ronald Dworkin's Views on Abortion and Assisted Suicide. In Ronald Dworkin & Justine Burley (eds.), Journal of Ethics. Blackwell Pub. 218--240.
    In the first part of this article, I raise questions about Dworkin's theory of the intrinsic value of life and about the adequacy of his proposal to understand abortion in terms of different ways of valuing life. In the second part of the article, I consider his argument in "The Philosophers' Brief on Assisted Suicide", which claims that the distinction between killing and letting die is morally irrelevant, the distinction between intending and foreseeing death can be morally relevant but is (...)
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  49. F. M. Kamm (2004). Rights. In Jules Coleman & Scott Shapiro (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Jurisprudence and Philosophy of Law. OUP Oxford
  50. F. M. Kamm & Bonnie Steinbock (1994). Creation and Abortion. Bioethics 8 (2):183-186.
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