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Profile: Fraser MacBride (Glasgow University)
  1. Fraser MacBride (forthcoming). The Oxford Handbook of the History of Analytic Philosophy Michael Beaney (Ed.) Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2013, 1611pp., £110 ISBN: 9780199238842. [REVIEW] Philosophy:1-5.
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  2. Fraser MacBride (forthcoming). The Theories of Modality A Reply to von Wachter. Metaphysica.
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  3. Fraser MacBride (2014). Analytic Philosophy and its Synoptic Commission: Towards the Epistemic End of Days. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 74:221-236.
    There is no such thing as , conceived as a special discipline with its own distinctive subject matter or peculiar method. But there is an analytic task for philosophy that distinguishes it from other reflective pursuits, a global or synoptic commission: to establish whether the final outputs of other disciplines and common sense can be fused into a single periscopic vision of the Universe. And there is the hard-won insight that thought and language aren't transparent but stand in need of (...)
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  4. Fraser MacBride (2014). How Hochberg Helped Us Take the Ontological Turn: An Introduction. Dialectica 68 (2):163-169.
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  5. Fraser MacBride (2014). How Truth Depends Upon Being. Analysis 74 (3):370-378.
    According to Armstrong (amongst others) ‘any truth, should depend for its truth for something “outside” it’ where this one-way dependency is explained in terms of the asymmetric relationship that obtains between a truth and its truth-maker. But there’s no need to appeal to truth-makers to make sense of this dependency. The truth of a proposition is essentially determined by the interlocking semantic mechanism of reference and satisfaction which already ensures that the truth-value of a proposition depends on how things stand (...)
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  6. Fraser Macbride (2014). Russell's Logical Atomism, by David Bostock. Mind 123 (491):873-876.
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  7. Fraser Macbride (2014). The Unity of the Proposition, by Richard Gaskin. Mind 123 (491):898-901.
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  8. Fraser MacBride (2013). For Keeping Truth in Truthmaking. Analysis 73 (4):686-695.
    Is the truthmaker principle a development of the correspondence theory of truth? So Armstrong introduced the truthmaker principle to us, but Lewis (2001. Forget about the ‘correspondence theory of truth’. Analysis 61: 275–80.) influentially argued that it is neither a correspondence theory nor a theory of truth. But the truthmaker principle can be correctly understood as a development of the correspondence theory if it’s conceived as incorporating the insight that truth is a relation between truth-bearers and something worldly. And we (...)
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  9. Fraser MacBride (2013). How Involved Do You Want to Be in a Non-Symmetric Relationship? Australasian Journal of Philosophy 92 (1):1-16.
    There are three different degrees to which we may allow a systematic theory of the world to embrace the idea of relatedness?supposing realism about non-symmetric relations as a background requirement. (First Degree) There are multiple ways in which a non-symmetric relation may apply to the things it relates?for the binary case, aRb ? bRa. (Second Degree) Every such relation has a distinct converse?for every R such that aRb there is another relation R* such that bR*a. (Third Degree) Each one of (...)
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  10. Fraser MacBride, Truthmakers. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  11. Fraser Macbride (2012). The Cambridge Revolt Against Idealism: Was There Ever an Eden? Metaphilosophy 43 (1-2):135-146.
    According to one creation myth, analytic philosophy emerged in Cambridge when Moore and Russell abandoned idealism in favour of naive realism: every word stood for something; it was only after “the Fall,” Russell's discovery of his theory of descriptions, that they realized some complex phrases (“the present King of France”) didn't stand for anything. It has become a commonplace of recent scholarship to object that even before the Fall, Russell acknowledged that such phrases may fail to denote. But we need (...)
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  12. Fraser MacBride (2011). Extreme Metaphysics: Hossack on Logical Objects, Facts, Propositions and Universals. Dialectica 65 (1):87-101.
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  13. Fraser MacBride (2011). Impure Reference: A Way Around the Concept Horse Paradox. Philosophical Perspectives 25 (1):297-312.
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  14. Fraser MacBride (2011). Relations and Truthmaking. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 111 (1pt1):161-179.
    Can Bradley's Regress be solved by positing relational tropes as truth-makers? No, no more than Russell's paradox can be solved by positing Fregean extensions. To call a trope relational is to pack into its essence the relating function it is supposed to perform but without explaining what Bradley's Regress calls into question, viz. the capacity of relations to relate. This problem has been masked from view by the (questionable) assumption that the only genuine ontological problems that can be intelligibly raised (...)
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  15. Fraser MacBride (2009). Review of Roger M. White, Wittgenstein's Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2009 (5).
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  16. Fraser MacBride (2009). Universals : The Contemporary Debate. In Robin Le Poidevin (ed.), The Routledge Companion to Metaphysics. Routledge.
     
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  17. Fraser MacBride (2008). Can Ante Rem Structuralism Solve the Access Problem? Philosophical Quarterly 58 (230):155-164.
    Ante rem structuralism is the doctnne that mathematics descubes a realm of abstract (structural) universab. According to its proponents, appeal to the exutence of these universab provides a source distinctive insight into the epistemology of mathematics, in particular insight into the so-called 'access problem' of explaining how mathematicians can reliably access truths about an abstract realm to which they cannot travel andfiom which they recave no signab. Stewart Shapiro offers the most developed version of this view to date. Through an (...)
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  18. Fraser MacBride (2007). Neutral Relations Revisited. Dialectica 61 (1):25–56.
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  19. Fraser MacBride, Review of G. Rodriguez-Pereyra's Resemblance Nominalism. [REVIEW]
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  20. F. MacBride (2006). Subject and Predicate. In Barry C. Smith (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Language. Oxford University Press.
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  21. Fraser MacBride (ed.) (2006). Identity and Modality. Oxford University Press.
    The eleven new papers in this volume address fundamental and interrelated philosophical issues concerning modality and identity, issues that were pivotal to the development of analytic philosophy in the twentieth century, and remain a key focus of debate in the twenty-first. Identity and Modality brings together leading researchers in metaphysics, the philosophy of mind, the philosophy of science, and the philosophy of mathematics.
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  22. Fraser MacBride (2006). Predicate Reference. In Barry C. Smith (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Language. Oxford University Press. 422--475.
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  23. Fraser MacBride (2006). The Julius Caesar Objection : More Problematic Than Ever. In , Identity and Modality. Oxford University Press. 174.
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  24. Fraser MacBride (2006). What Constitutes the Numerical Diversity of Mathematical Objects? Analysis 66 (289):63–69.
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  25. C. Chihara & Fraser MacBride (2005). REVIEWS-A Structural Account of Mathematics. Bulletin of Symbolic Logic 11 (1):79-82.
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  26. Fraser MacBride (2005). Chihara Charles. A Structural Account of Mathematics. Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2004, Xiv+ 380 Pp. [REVIEW] Bulletin of Symbolic Logic 11 (1):79-83.
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  27. Fraser MacBride (2005). Introducing Analytic Philosophy: Its Sense and its Nonsense 1879–2002. Dialectica 59 (1):81–87.
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  28. Fraser MacBride (2005). Lewis's Animadversions on the Truthmaker Principle. In Helen Beebee & Julian Dodd (eds.), Truthmakers: The Contemporary Debate. Clarendon.
  29. Fraser MacBride (2005). Ramsey on Universals. In Hallvard Lillehammer & D. H. Mellor (eds.), Ramsey's Legacy. Oxford University Press.
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  30. Fraser MacBride (2005). Structuralism Reconsidered. In Stewart Shapiro (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Mathematics and Logic. Oxford University Press. 563--589.
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  31. Fraser MacBride (2005). The Julio César Problem. Dialectica 59 (2):223–236.
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  32. Fraser MacBride (2005). The Particular–Universal Distinction: A Dogma of Metaphysics? Mind 114 (455):565-614.
    Is the assumption of a fundamental distinction between particulars and universals another unsupported dogma of metaphysics? F. P. Ramsey famously rejected the particular–universal distinction but neglected to consider the many different conceptions of the distinction that have been advanced. As a contribution to the (inevitably) piecemeal investigation of this issue three interrelated conceptions of the particular–universal distinction are examined: (i) universals, by contrast to particulars, are unigrade; (ii) particulars are related to universals by an asymmetric tie of exemplification; (iii) universals (...)
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  33. F. MacBride (2004). Whence the Particular-Universal Distinction? Grazer Philosophische Studien 67 (1):181-194.
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  34. Fraser MacBride (2004). Introduction. Philosophical Quarterly 54 (214):1 - 15.
    Frege attempted to provide arithmetic with a foundation in logic. But his attempt to do so was confounded by Russell's discovery of paradox at the heart of Frege's system. The papers collected in this special issue contribute to the on-going investigation into the foundations of mathematics and logic. After sketching the historical background, this introduction provides an overview of the papers collected here, tracing some of the themes that connect them.
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  35. Fraser MacBride (2004). Can Structuralism Solve the ‘Access’ Problem? Analysis 64 (284):309–317.
  36. Fraser MacBride (2004). Particulars, Modes and Universals: An Examination of E.J. Lowe's Four-Fold Ontology. Dialectica 58 (3):317–333.
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  37. Fraser MacBride (2004). Review of Gonzalo Rodriguez-Pereyra, Resemblance Nominalism: A Solution to the Problem of Universals. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2004 (2).
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  38. Connie Xiaokang Yu, Maria Luisa Dalla Chiara, Fraser MacBride, Dale Jacquette, Maarten Marx, Stig Alstrup Rasmussen & Sven Ove Hansson (2004). Book Reviews. [REVIEW] Studia Logica 77 (1):619-624.
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  39. Fraser MacBride (2003). Facts and Universals: Besprechungsaufsatz Zu: Herbert Hochberg, Russell, Moore and Wittgenstein: The Revival of Realism. Frankfurt, A. M.: Hänsel-Hohenhausen, 2001. [REVIEW] Grazer Philosophische Studien 65 (1):207-222.
  40. Fraser MacBride (2003). Review: The Philosophy of Mathematics Today. [REVIEW] Mind 112 (448):792-799.
  41. Fraser MacBride (2003). Speaking with Shadows: A Study of Neo-Logicism. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 54 (1):103-163.
    According to the species of neo-logicism advanced by Hale and Wright, mathematical knowledge is essentially logical knowledge. Their view is found to be best understood as a set of related though independent theses: (1) neo-fregeanism-a general conception of the relation between language and reality; (2) the method of abstraction-a particular method for introducing concepts into language; (3) the scope of logic-second-order logic is logic. The criticisms of Boolos, Dummett, Field and Quine (amongst others) of these theses are explicated and assessed. (...)
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  42. Fraser MacBride (2003). The Philosophy of Mathematics Today. Mind 112 (448):792-799.
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  43. F. MacBride (2002). Articulating Reasons: An Introduction to Inferentialism. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 80 (2):237 – 238.
    Book Information Articulating Reasons: An Introduction To Inferentialism. By Brandom Robert. Harvard University Press. Cambridge. 2000. Pp. 230. Hardback, £23.95.
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  44. Fraser MacBride (2002). Could Nothing Matter? Analysis 62 (2):125–135.
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  45. Fraser MacBride (2002). Truth-Making and Analysis: A Reply to Rodriguez-Pereyra. Philosophical Papers 31 (1):49-61.
    Philosophical Papers Vol.31(1) 2002: 49-61.
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  46. Fraser MacBride (2002). The Problem of Universals and the Limits of Truth-Making. Philosophical Papers 31 (1):27-37.
    There is no single problem of universals but a family of difficulties that treat of a variety of interwoven metaphysical, epistemological, logical and semantic themes. This makes the problem of universals resistant to canonical reduction (to a ‘once-and-for-all’ concern). In particular, the problem of universals cannot be reduced to the problem of supplying truth-makers for sentences that express sameness of type. This is (in part) because the conceptual distinction between numerical and qualitative identity must first be drawn before a sentence (...)
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  47. F. MacBride (2001). Four New Ways to Change Your Shape. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 79 (1):81 – 89.
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  48. Fraser MacBride (2001). Can the Property Boom Last? Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 101 (3):225–246.
    The contemporary Humean programme that seeks to combine property realism with the denial of necessary connections between distinct existences is flawed. Objects and properties by their very natures are entangled in such connections. It follows that modal notions cannot be reductively analysed by appeal to the concept property, not even if the reducing theory posits an abundant supply of entities to fall under that concept.
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  49. Fraser Macbride (2000). On Finite Humet. Philosophia Mathematica 8 (2):150-159.
    Neo-Ftegeanism contends that knowledge of arithmetic may be acquired by second-order logical reflection upon Hume's principle. Heck argues that Hume's principle doesn't inform ordinary arithmetical reasoning and so knowledge derived from it cannot be genuinely arithmetical. To suppose otherwise, Heck claims, is to fail to comprehend the magnitude of Cantor's conceptual contribution to mathematics. Heck recommends that finite Hume's principle be employed instead to generate arithmetical knowledge. But a better understanding of Cantor's contribution is achieved if it is supposed that (...)
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  50. F. MacBride (1999). Survey Article. Listening to Fictions: A Study of Fieldian Nominalism. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 50 (3):431-455.
    One cannot escape the feeling that these mathematical formulae have an independent existence and an intelligence of their own, that they are wiser than we are, wiser even than their discoverers.
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