10 found
Sort by:
  1. David W. Hart & F. Neil Brady (2005). Spirituality and Archetype in Organizational Life. Business Ethics Quarterly 15 (3):409-428.
    Spirituality is an undeniable human need and is thus the subject of increasing interest among management scholars and practitioners. In this article, we propose using archetypal psychology as a framework for understanding the human need for spirituality more clearly because it provides important insights into spirituality and organizational life. Because most spiritual needs reside in the deepest aspects of the self, an archetypal approach helps us recognize not only that we have spiritual needs but also why we have them. We (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. F. Neil Brady (2002). Lining Up for Star-Wars Tickets: Some Ruminations on Ethics and Economics Based on an Internet Study of Behavior in Queues. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 38 (1-2):157 - 165.
    Queues may represent business ethics in microcosm: they provide an opportunity to study in a smaller package the fundamental ethical tension in economic activity between self-interest and civility in the context of uncertainty and stress. In May 1999 people began forming lines to purchase tickets to the new Star Wars movie "The Phantom Menace." This paper reviews responses to a questionnaire on the internet regarding experiences in those lines. It focuses on two behaviors threatening queue discipline – the formation of (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. F. Neil Brady (1999). A Systematic Approach to Teaching Ethics in Business. Journal of Business Ethics 19 (3):309 - 318.
    In the field of business ethics, expositions of ethical theory have tended to focus on deontology and utilitarianism. More inclusive reviews of ethical theory tend to be historical and unsystematic. This paper approaches the task of representing the variety of ethical theories systematically. It does so by constructing a schema of possibilities in ethical theory which maps out six "voices", or theoretical positions, all of which are relevant and important for understanding ethics in business. This approach helps to account for (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. F. Neil Brady (1997). Natural Law and Business Ethics. Business Ethics Quarterly 7 (2):83-107.
    We describe the Catholic natural law tradition by examining its origins in the medieval penitentials, the papal decretals, the writings of Thomas Aquinas, and seventeenth century casuistry. Catholic natural law emerges as a flexible ethic that conceives of human nature as rational and as oriented to certain basic goods that ought to be pursued and whose pursuit is made possible by the virtues. We then identify four approaches to natural law that have evolved within the United States during the twentieth (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. F. Neil Brady & Gloria E. Wheeler (1996). An Empirical Study of Ethical Predispositions. Journal of Business Ethics 15 (9):927 - 940.
    Using a two-part instrument consisting of eight vignettes and twenty character traits, the study sampled 141 employees of a mid-west financial firm regarding their predispositions to prefer utilitarian or formalist forms of ethical reasoning. In contrast with earlier studies, we found that these respondents did not prefer utilitarian reasoning. Several other hypotheses were tested involving the relationship between (1) people's preferences for certain types of solutions to issues and (2) the forms of reasoning they use to arrive at those solutions; (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. F. Neil Brady & Craig P. Dunn (1995). Business Meta-Ethics. Business Ethics Quarterly 5 (3):385-398.
    The main purpose of this paper is to defend traditional ethical theory (utilitarianism and deontology) for its application in business against a more recent model consisting of utility, rights, and justice. This is done in three parts: First, we provide a conceptual argument for the superiority of the traditional model; second, we demonstrate these points through an examination of three short cases; and third, we argue for the capability of the traditional model to account for universals and particulars in ethics.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. F. Neil Brady & Mary Jo Hatch (1992). General Causal Models in Business Ethics: An Essay on Colliding Research Traditions. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 11 (4):307 - 315.
    The construction of causal models for research in business ethics has become fashionable in recent years. This paper explores four recent proposals, comparing and contrasting their views. The primary purpose of this paper is to expose several confusions inherent in such models and to account for these errors in terms of a failure to distinguish between models as theories and models as representing a research tradition. We conclude with a brief set of recommendations for linking two major research traditions in (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. F. Neil Brady (1988). Practical Formalism: A New Methodological Proposal for Business Ethics. Journal of Business Ethics 7 (3):163 - 170.
    The traditional exposition of Kantian ethical theory in the business ethics literature is abstract, esoteric, and impractical compared to the more usable presentations of utilitarianism. This situation can be improved by identifying and describing the conceptual dimensions of formalistic ethical reasoning, as contained in the interplay between case and principle, with examples from the business/society literature.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. F. Neil Brady & Jeanne M. Logsdon (1988). Zimbardo's “Stanford Prison Experiment” and the Relevance of Social Psychology for Teaching Business Ethics. Journal of Business Ethics 7 (9):703 - 710.
    The prevailing pedagogical approach in business ethics generally underestimates or even ignores the powerful influences of situational factors on ethical analysis and decision-making. This is due largely to the predominance of philosophy-oriented teaching materials. Social psychology offers relevant concepts and experiments that can broaden pedagogy to help students understand more fully the influence of situational contexts and role expectations in ethical analysis. Zimbardo's Stanford Prison Experiment is used to illustrate the relevance of social psychology experiments for business ethics instruction.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. F. Neil Brady (1985). A Defense of Utilitarian Policy Processes in Corporate and Public Management. Journal of Business Ethics 4 (1):23 - 30.
    The growing awareness that corporate and public policy forming processes are intensively utilitarian has provoked a variety of criticism. The procedural difficulties of utilitarianism are well known; less well known but potentially more devastating is a set of charges that utilitarian policy processes intrude upon important relationships and societal processes. This paper defends utilitarian methods against these charges.More specifically, two criticisms are singled out for examination. The first is the claim that utilitarian policy processes systematically discriminate against the rights of (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation