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  1. F. R. Jevons (1973). Science Observed; Science as a Social and Intellectual Activity. London,Allen & Unwin.
     
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  2. F. R. Jevons & H. D. Turner (1972). What Kinds of Graduates Do We Need? British Journal of Educational Studies 20 (3):338-339.
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  3. F. R. Jevons (1967). The History of Cell Respiration and Cytochrome. [REVIEW] British Journal for the History of Science 3 (3):302-303.
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  4. F. R. Jevons (1965). „Lumping“ in Plotinus's Thought. Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 47 (1):132-140.
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  5. F. R. Jevons (1964). I. Dequantitation in Plotinus's Cosmology. Phronesis 9 (1):64-71.
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  6. F. R. Jevons (1964). Paracelsus's Two-Way Astrology: II. Man's Relation to the Stars. British Journal for the History of Science 2 (2):148-155.
    The preceding paper described how all-pervasive was the influence that Paracelsus designated ‘astral’. In what sense, then, is it true that he placed restrictions, on astrological powers? The restriction applies to the more limited and usual sense of astrology, referring to the control of events on earth by the stars in the sky. Paracelsus was not prepared to hand over our fates entirely to a distant autocracy of the stars quite beyond our control.
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  7. F. R. Jevons (1964). Paracelsus's Two-Way Astrology: I. What Paracelsus Meant by ‘Stars’. British Journal for the History of Science 2 (2):139-147.
    References to the stars permeate the writings of Paracelsus ; yet modern authorities comment on the way he restricted astrological influence. The contradiction is only apparent, and disappears when the significance he attached to the relevant vocabulary is understood. He had in mind a kind of influence rather different from that usually thought of in connection with astrology, and the astrological jargon he bandied about had a metaphorical more often than a literal meaning. In his major works, signs of detailed (...)
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