27 found
Sort by:
Disambiguations:
Fritz Rohrlich [23]F. Rohrlich [4]
  1. Fritz Rohrlich (2004). Realism Despite Cognitive Antireductionism. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 18 (1):73 – 88.
    Building on previous work, I continue the arguments for scientific realism in the presence of a natural level structure of science. That structure results from a cognitive antireductionism that calls for the retention of mature theories even though they have been "superseded". The level structure is based on "scientific truth" characterized by a theory's validity domain and the confirming empirical data. Reductionism (including fundamentalism) fails cognitively because of qualitative differences in the ontology and semantics of successive theories. This cognitive failure (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Fritz Rohrlich, The Arrow of Time in Classical Electrodynamics.
    The reason for the arrow of time in electromagnetic radiation is explicated.
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Fritz Rohrlich, Theory Coherence and Antirealism.
    Cognitive scientific realism as presented in my previous paper is amended to include a new and strong epistemic indicator for truth of scietific theories: theory coherence and by implication level coherence. Interestingly, this coherence exists despite the incommensurability of the ontology of different levels. Combined with empirical adequacy, theory coherence provides convincing arguments for the confutation of antirealist views. Specifically, fundamentalism, underdetermination, and instrumentalism are considered.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Fritz Rohrlich (2001). Cognitive Scientific Realism. Philosophy of Science 68 (2):185-202.
    Our cognitive capabilities force us into a description of the world by levels. But theories on different levels result in descriptions that differ qualitatively. Therefore, the resulting incommensurability requires ontological bridges between such theories. These are obtained uniquely when the equations of the reduced theory are compared with a suitable limit of the equations of the reducing theory. Four case studies from theoretical physics and astronomy support this claim, two for theories of composites and two for non-composites (field theories). These (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. F. Rohrlich (2000). Causality and the Arrow of Classical Time. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 31 (1):1-13.
    It is claimed that the `problem of the arrow of time in classical dynamics' has been solved. Since all classical particles have a self-field (gravitational and in some cases also electromagnetic), their dynamics must include self-interaction. This fact and the observation that the domain of validity of classical physics is restricted to distances not less than of the order of a Compton wavelength (thus excluding point particles), leads to the conclusion that the fundamental classical equations of motion are not invariant (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Fritz Rohrlich (2000). The Equivalence Principle Revisited. Foundations of Physics 30 (5):621-630.
    The validity of the equivalence principle is examined. Since classical physics is not valid for point particles, and a mass density over a finite volume tends to collapse, stabilizing forces are necessary. These cause a deviation from geodesic motion. That deviation is discussed in the light of recent results which provide approximate expressions for the self-force of a finite size particle due to both its mass and its charge. The equivalence principle appears to be violated.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Fritz Rohrlich (1999). Papers From the Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy. Foundations of Science 4 (2):113-114.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Diederik Aerts & Fritz Rohrlich (1998). Reduction. Foundations of Science 3 (1):27-35.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Fritz Rohrlich (1998). The Arrow of Time in the Equations of Motion. Foundations of Physics 28 (7):1045-1056.
    It is argued that time's arrow is present in all equations of motion. But it is absent in the point particle approximations commonly made. In particular, the Lorentz-Abraham-Dirac equation is time-reversal invariant only because it approximates the charged particle by a point. But since classical electrodynamics is valid only for finite size particles, the equations of motion for particles of finite size must be considered. Those equations are indeed found to lack time-reversal invariance, thus ensuring an arrow of time. Similarly, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Fritz Rohrlich (1997). Cognitive Emergence. Philosophy of Science Supplement 64 (4):346-58.
    Examination of attempts at theory reduction (S to T) shows that a process of cognitive emergence is involved in which concepts of S, Cs, emerge from T. This permits the 'bridge laws' to be stated. These are not in conflict with incommensurability of the Cs with the CT. Cognitive emergence may occur asymptotically or because of similarities of mathematical expressions; it is not necessarily holistic. Mereologically and nonmereologically related theory pairs are considered. Examples are chosen from physics. An important distinction (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. F. Rohrlich (1996). Interpreting Quantum Field Theory. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 27 (1):91-98.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Fritz Rohrlich (1996). Interpreting Quantum Field Theory. [REVIEW] Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 27 (1):91-98.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Fritz Rohrlich (1996). Interpreting Quantum Field Theory: Paul Teller, An Interpretive Introduction to Quantum Field Theory (Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1995), 176 Pp., ISBN 0-691-07408-9. [REVIEW] Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 27 (1):91-98.
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Fritz Rohrlich (1996). Scientific Realism: A Challenge to Physicists. [REVIEW] Foundations of Physics 26 (4):443-451.
    If a physicist claims to be a realist, he or she must face at least the three problems outlined here: the careful specification of the validity limits of every theory and model used, the coherence relationships that must hold between two theories of the same physical system but on different cognitive levels, and the ambiguity in the ontology of two different formulations of empirically equivalent theories.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Fritz Rohrlich (1996). The Unreasonable Effectiveness of Physical Intuition: Success While Ignoring Objections. [REVIEW] Foundations of Physics 26 (12):1617-1626.
    The process of theory development in physics is a very complex one. The best scientists sometimes proceed on the basis of their physical intuition, ignoring serious conceptual or mathematical objections well known to them at the time.The results soon justify their actions: but the removal of these objections is often not possible for a very long time. Four examples are presented: Newton, Schrödinger, Dirac, Dyson. Some thoughts on this “unreasonableness≓ are offered.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Fritz Rohrlich (1994). Scientific Explanation: From Covering Law to Covering Theory. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1994:69 - 77.
    A new model of scientific explanation is proposed: the covering theory model. Its goal is understanding. One chooses the appropriate scientific theory and a model within it. From these follows the functioning of the explanandum, i.e. the way in which the model portrays it on one particular cognitive level. It requires an ontology and knowledge of the causal processes, probabilities, or potentialities (propensities) according to which it functions. This knowledge yields understanding. Explanations across cognitive levels demand pluralistic ontologies. An explanation (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Fritz Rohrlich (1990). Computer Simulation in the Physical Sciences. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1990:507 - 518.
    Computer simulation is shown to be philosophically interesting because it introduces a qualitatively new methodology for theory construction in science different from the conventional two components of "theory" and "experiment and/or observation". This component is "experimentation with theoretical models." Two examples from the physical sciences are presented for the purpose of demonstration but it is claimed that the biological and social sciences permit similar theoretical model experiments. Furthermore, computer simulation permits theoretical models for the evolution of physical systems (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Fritz Rohrlich (1990). Response to Criticism. Educational Philosophy and Theory 22 (1):29–30.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Fritz Rohrlich (1990). There is Good Physics in Theory Reduction. Foundations of Physics 20 (11):1399-1412.
    Theory reduction is analyzed and examples are presented from various branches of physics. The procedure takes different forms in different theories. Examples from various theories are arranged in increasing order of difficulty. Special emphasis is placed on the quantum to classical reduction. It is argued that there is good and interesting physics in theory reduction and that it deserves more attention than it has been receiving in the past.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. F. Rohrlich (1989). Review. [REVIEW] Erkenntnis 30 (3):409-417.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Fritz Rohrlich (1989). The Logic of Reduction: The Case of Gravitation. [REVIEW] Foundations of Physics 19 (10):1151-1170.
    The reduction from Einstein's to Newton's gravitation theories (and intermediate steps) is used to exemplify reduction in physical theories. Both dimensionless and dimensional reduction are presented, and the advantages and disadvantages of each are pointed out. It is concluded that neither a completely reductionist nor a completely antireductionist view can be maintained. Only the mathematical structure is strictly reducible. The interpretation (the model, the central concepts) of the superseded theory T′ can at best only partially be derived directly from the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Fritz Rohrlich (1988). Four Philosophical Issues Essential for Good Science Teaching. Educational Philosophy and Theory 20 (2):1–6.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Fritz Rohrlich (1988). Pluralistic Ontology and Theory Reduction in the Physical Sciences. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 39 (3):295-312.
    It is demonstrated that the reduction of a physical theory S to another one, T, in the sense that S can be derived from T holds in general only for the mathematical framework. The interpretation of S and the associated central terms cannot all be derived from those of T because of the qualitative differences between the cognitive levels of S and T. Their cognitively autonomous status leads to an epistemic as well as an ontological pluralism. This pluralism is consistent (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. F. Rohrlich (1987). From Paradox to Reality: Our New Concepts of the Physical World. Cambridge University Press.
    Using a clear, non-technical style, Professor Rohrlich discusses the two major theories of twentieth-century physics: relativity and quantum mechanics. Discussed conceptually and philosophically, rather than using mathematics, the philosophical issues raised show how new discoveries forced physicists to accept often strange and unconventional notions. He aims to remove the mystery and misrepresentation that often surround the ideas of modern physics and to show how modern scientists construct theories, so that the reader can appreciate their successes and failures and understand problems (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Fritz Rohrlich (1987). Schrödinger and the Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics. Foundations of Physics 17 (12):1205-1220.
    On the occasion of the centennial of his birth, Schrödinger's life and views are sketched and his critique of the interpretation of quantum mechanics accepted at his time is examined. His own interpretation, which he had to abandon after a short time, provides a prime example of the way in which the tentative meaning of central theoretical terms in a new and revolutionary theory often fails. Schrödinger's strong philosophical convictions have played a key role in his refusal to break with (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Fritz Rohrlich & Larry Hardin (1983). Established Theories. Philosophy of Science 50 (4):603-617.
    Criteria are given to characterize mature theories in contradistinction to developing theories. We lean heavily on the physical sciences. An established theory is defined as a mature one with known validity limits. The approximate truth of such theories is thereby given a quantitative character. Superseding theories do not falsify established theories because the latter are protected by their validity limits. This view of scientific realism leads to ontological levels and cumulativity of knowledge. It is applied to a defense of realism (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Fritz Rohrlich (1973). The Electron: Development of the First Elementary Particle Theory. In. In Jagdish Mehra (ed.), The Physicist's Conception of Nature. Boston,Reidel. 331--369.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation