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  1. Fabrizio Amerini (2013). Thomas Aquinas and Some Italian Dominicans (Francis of Prato, Georgius Rovegnatinus and Girolamo Savonarola) on Signification and Supposition. Vivarium 51 (1-4):327-351.
  2. Gabriele Galluzzo & Fabrizio Amerini (eds.) (2013). A Companion to the Latin Medieval Commentaries on Aristotle’s Metaphysics. Brill.
    Few philosophical books have been so influential in the development of Western thought as Aristotle’s Metaphysics. In fourteen substantial essays this volume reconstructs the late medieval reception of this work, by focusing on the main medieval commentators and a common set of metaphysical topics.
     
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  3. Fabrizio Amerini (2011). Intentionality. In H. Lagerlund (ed.), Encyclopedia of Medieval Philosophy. Springer. 558--564.
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  4. Fabrizio Amerini (2011). Intention, Primary and Secondary. In H. Lagerlund (ed.), Encyclopedia of Medieval Philosophy. Springer. 555--558.
  5. Fabrizio Amerini (2011). Pragmatics and Semantics in Thomas Aquinas. Vivarium 49 (1-3):95-126.
    Thomas Aquinas's account of the semantics of names is based on two fundamental distinctions: the distinction between a name's mode of signifying and the signified object, and that between the cause and the goal of a name's signification, i.e. that from which a name was instituted to signify and that which a name actually signifies. Thomas endows names with a two-layer signification: names are introduced into language to designate primarily conceptions of extramental things and secondarily the particular extramental things referred (...)
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  6. Fabrizio Amerini (2011). Paul of Venice. In H. Lagerlund (ed.), Encyclopedia of Medieval Philosophy. Springer. 925--931.
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  7. Fabrizio Amerini (2010). Later Medieval Perspectives on Intentionality. An Introduction. Quaestio 10 (1):3-23.
    Historians of medieval philosophy have always paid attention to the topic of intentionality. This is not surprising. For medieval authors, the analysis of the metaphysics and the mechanisms of human cognition became over time one of the most important instruments for approaching a bundle of basic philosophical and theological questions, such as the nature of universals, the mind-world relation, the explanation of divine knowledge, and the like. For this and other reasons, theories of cognition have been a crucial theme for (...)
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  8. Fabrizio Amerini (2009). William of Ockham and Mental Synonymy. The Case of Nugation. Franciscan Studies 67 (1):375-403.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:I. William of Ockham and Mental SynonymyIn recent years an important point of discussion among the scholars of William of Ockham has been the possibility of accounting for a reductionist interpretation of Ockham's mental language. Especially, the debate focused on the legitimacy of eliminating connotative simple terms from mental language by reducing them to their nominal definition. The distinction between absolute and connotative terms plays an important role in (...)
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  9. Fabrizio Amerini (2008). The Semantics of Substantial Names. Recherches de Theologie Et Philosophie Medievales 75 (2):395-440.
    Aristotle begins the third chapter of book VIII of the Metaphysics by claiming that sometimes it is not clear whether a name refers to the composite substance or to the actuality and the form, for instance whether «animal» refers to the soul in a body or simply to the soul. In solving this problem, Aristotle states that the name «animal» can refer to both, not, however, in one and the same sense but rather by expressing two different senses which are (...)
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  10. Fabrizio Amerini & Francesco (eds.) (2008). Dal Convento Alla Città: Filosofia E Teologia in Francesco da Prato O.P. (Xiv Secolo): Atti Del Convegno Internazionale di Storia Della Filosofia Medievale, Prato, Palazzo Comunale, 18-19 Maggio 2007. [REVIEW] C. Zella.
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  11. Fabrizio Amerini & Francesco (eds.) (2008). Dal Convento Alla Città: Filosofia E Teologia in Francesco da Prato O. C. Zella.
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  12. Fabrizio Amerini (2006). Utrum Inhaerentia Sit de Essentia Accidentis. Francis of Marchia and the Debate on the Nature of Accidents. Vivarium 44 (1):96-150.
    This paper attempts to provide a general reconstruction of Francis of Marchia's doctrine of accidental being. The paper is divided into two parts. (1) In the first part, I begin by reconstructing the debate on the nature of accidents held before Marchia, showing that such a debate is characterised by a progressive shift concerning the way to understand accidents. While the first Aristotelian interpreters regard accidents especially as inhering modes of being of substances, the majority of theologians and philosophers in (...)
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  13. Fabrizio Amerini (2005). Alessandro di Alessandria su natura e soggetto della metafisica. Quaestio 5 (1):477-493.
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  14. Fabrizio Amerini (2005). What is Real. A Reply to Ockham's Ontological Program. Vivarium 43 (1):187-212.
    When Ockham's logic arrives in Italy, some Dominican philosophers bring into question Ockham's ontological reductionist program. Among them, Franciscus de Prato and Stephanus de Reate pay a great attention to refute Ockham's claim that no universal exists in the extra-mental world. In order to reject Ockham's program, they start by reconsidering the notion of 'real', then the range of application of the rational and the real distinction. Generally, their strategy consists in re-addressing against Ockham some arguments extracted from Hervaeus Natalis's (...)
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