Search results for 'Facial Expressions' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Order:
  1. U. Dimberg, M. Thunberg & K. Elmehed (2000). Unconscious Facial Reactions to Emotional Facial Expressions. Psychological Science 11 (1):86-89.
  2.  30
    John D. Eastwood & Daniel Smilek (2005). Functional Consequences of Perceiving Facial Expressions of Emotion Without Awareness. Consciousness and Cognition 14 (3):565-584.
    A substantial body of research has established that even when we are not consciously aware of the faces of others we are nevertheless sensitive to, and impacted by their facial expression. In this paper, we consider this body of research from a new perspective by examining the functions of unconscious perception revealed by these studies. A consideration of the literature from this perspective highlights that existing research methods are limited when it comes to revealing possible functions of unconscious perception. (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  3.  8
    Harold Schlosberg (1952). The Description of Facial Expressions in Terms of Two Dimensions. Journal of Experimental Psychology 44 (4):229.
  4.  47
    Catherine M. Herba, Maike Heining, Andrew W. Young, Michael Browning, Philip J. Benson, Mary L. Phillips & Jeffrey A. Gray (2007). Conscious and Nonconscious Discrimination of Facial Expressions. Visual Cognition 15 (1):36-47.
  5. Elaine Fox (2002). Processing Emotional Facial Expressions: The Role of Anxiety and Awareness. Cognitive, Affective and Behavioral Neuroscience 2 (1):52-63.
  6.  6
    Robert P. Abelson & Vello Sermat (1962). Multidimensional Scaling of Facial Expressions. Journal of Experimental Psychology 63 (6):546.
  7.  4
    H. Scholsberg (1941). A Scale for the Judgment of Facial Expressions. Journal of Experimental Psychology 29 (6):497.
  8.  5
    Trygg Engen & Nissim Levy (1956). Constant-Sum Judgments of Facial Expressions. Journal of Experimental Psychology 51 (6):396.
  9.  3
    Trygg Engen, Nissim Levy & Harold Schlosberg (1958). The Dimensional Analysis of a New Series of Facial Expressions. Journal of Experimental Psychology 55 (5):454.
  10. Lennart Sjoberg (1968). Unidimensional Scaling of Multidimensional Facial Expressions. Journal of Experimental Psychology 78 (3p1):429.
  11.  2
    Ran R. Hassin, Hillel Aviezer & Shlomo Bentin (2013). Inherently Ambiguous: Facial Expressions of Emotions, in Context. Emotion Review 5 (1):60-65.
    With a few yet increasing number of exceptions, the cognitive sciences enthusiastically endorsed the idea that there are basic facial expressions of emotions that are created by specific configurations of facial muscles. We review evidence that suggests an inherent role for context in emotion perception. Context does not merely change emotion perception at the edges; it leads to radical categorical changes. The reviewed findings suggest that configurations of facial muscles are inherently ambiguous, and they call for (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  12.  6
    Paul J. Whalen, Hannah Raila, Randi Bennett, Alison Mattek, Annemarie Brown, James Taylor, Michelle van Tieghem, Alexandra Tanner, Matthew Miner & Amy Palmer (2013). Neuroscience and Facial Expressions of Emotion: The Role of Amygdala–Prefrontal Interactions. Emotion Review 5 (1):78-83.
    The aim of this review is to show the fruitfulness of using images of facial expressions as experimental stimuli in order to study how neural systems support biologically relevant learning as it relates to social interactions. Here we consider facial expressions as naturally conditioned stimuli which, when presented in experimental paradigms, evoke activation in amygdala–prefrontal neural circuits that serve to decipher the predictive meaning of the expressions. Facial expressions offer a relatively innocuous strategy (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  13.  9
    Linda A. Camras & Jennifer M. Shutter (2010). Emotional Facial Expressions in Infancy. Emotion Review 2 (2):120-129.
    In this article, we review empirical evidence regarding the relationship between facial expression and emotion during infancy. We focus on differential emotions theory’s view of this relationship because of its theoretical and methodological prominence. We conclude that current evidence fails to support its proposal regarding a set of pre-specified facial expressions that invariably reflect a corresponding set of discrete emotions in infants. Instead, the relationship between facial expression and emotion appears to be more complex. Some (...) expressions may have different meanings in infants than in children and adults. In addition, nonemotion factors may sometimes lead to the production of “emotional” facial expressions. We consider alternative perspectives on the nature of emotion and emotional expression in infancy with particular focus on differentiation and dynamical systems approaches. (shrink)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  14.  5
    Zsófia Ruttkay (2009). Cultural Dialects of Real and Synthetic Emotional Facial Expressions. AI and Society 24 (3):307-315.
    In this article we discuss the aspects of designing facial expressions for virtual humans (VHs) with a specific culture. First we explore the notion of cultures and its relevance for applications with a VH. Then we give a general scheme of designing emotional facial expressions, and identify the stages where a human is involved, either as a real person with some specific role, or as a VH displaying facial expressions. We discuss how the display (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  15.  5
    Andrea Kobiella, Tobias Grossmann, Vincent M. Reid & Tricia Striano (2008). The Discrimination of Angry and Fearful Facial Expressions in 7-Month-Old Infants: An Event-Related Potential Study. Cognition and Emotion 22 (1):134-146.
    (2008). The discrimination of angry and fearful facial expressions in 7-month-old infants: An event-related potential study. Cognition & Emotion: Vol. 22, No. 1, pp. 134-146.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  16.  5
    Anna Wierzbicka (2000). The Semantics of Human Facial Expressions. Pragmatics and Cognition 8 (1):147-184.
    This paper points out that a major shift of paradigm is currently going on in the study of the human face and it seeks to articulate and to develop the fundamental assumptions underlying this shift. The main theses of the paper are: 1) Facial expressions can convey meanings comparable to the meanings of verbal utterances. 2) Semantic analysis (whether of verbal utterances or of facial expressions) must distinguish between the context-independent invariant and its contextual interpretations. 3) (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  17.  13
    Vanessa LoBue, Judy S. DeLoache & Jacob Miguel Vigil (2009). On the Detection of Emotional Facial Expressions: Are Girls Really Better Than Boys? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (5):397.
    One facet of Vigil's socio-relational framework of expressive behaviors (SRFB) suggests that females are more sensitive to facial expressions than are males, and should detect facial expressions more quickly. A re-examination of recent research with children demonstrates that girls do detect various facial expressions more quickly than do boys. Although this provides support for SRFB, further examination of SRFB in children would lend important support this evolutionary-based theory.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18.  48
    Axel Cleeremans, Change Blindness to Gradual Changes in Facial Expressions.
    Change blindness—our inability to detect changes in a stimulus—occurs even when the change takes place gradually, without disruption (Simons et al., 2000). Such gradual changes are more difficult to detect than changes that involve a disruption. In this experiment, we extend previous findings to the domain of facial expressions of emotions occurring in the context of a realistic scene. Even with changes occurring in central, highly relevant stimuli such as faces, gradual changes still produced high levels of change (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19.  4
    Roberto Caldara (2010). Beyond Smiles: The Impact of Culture and Race in Embodying and Decoding Facial Expressions. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (6):438-439.
    Understanding the very nature of the smile with an integrative approach and a novel model is a fertile ground for a new theoretical vision and insights. However, from this perspective, I challenge the authors to integrate culture and race in their model, because both factors would impact upon the embodying and decoding of facial expressions.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20.  9
    Silvia Rigato & Teresa Farroni (2013). The Role of Gaze in the Processing of Emotional Facial Expressions. Emotion Review 5 (1):36-40.
    Gaze plays a fundamental role in the processing of facial expressions from birth. Gaze direction is a crucial part of the social signal encoded in and decoded from faces. The ability to discriminate gaze direction, already evident early in life, is essential for the development of more complex socially relevant tasks, such as joint and shared attention. At the same time, facial expressions play a fundamental role in the encoding of gaze direction and, when combined, expression (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21.  4
    Sherri C. Widen (2013). Children's Interpretation of Facial Expressions: The Long Path From Valence-Based to Specific Discrete Categories. Emotion Review 5 (1):72-77.
    According to a common sense theory, facial expressions signal specific emotions to people of all ages and therefore provide children easy access to the emotions of those around them. The evidence, however, does not support that account. Instead, children’s understanding of facial expressions is poor and changes qualitatively and slowly over the course of development. Initially, children divide facial expressions into two simple categories (feels good, feels bad). These broad categories are then gradually differentiated (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22.  9
    D. Matsumoto & M. Lee (1993). Consciousness, Volition, and the Neuropsychology of Facial Expressions of Emotion. Consciousness and Cognition 2 (3):237-54.
    Although we have learned much about the neuropsychological control of facial expressions of emotion, there is still much work to do. We suggest that future work integrate advances in our theoretical understanding of the roles of volition and consciousness in the elicitation of emotion and the production of facial expressions with advances in our understanding of its underlying neurophysiology. We first review the facial musculature and the neural paths thought to innervate it, as well as (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23.  12
    Carl L. von Baeyer (2002). Children's Facial Expressions of Pain in the Context of Complex Social Interactions. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (4):473-474.
    In children experiencing pain, the study of the social context of facial expressions might help to evaluate evolutionary and conditioning hypotheses of behavioural development. Social motivations and influences may be complex, as seen in studies of children having their ears pierced, and in studies of everyday pain in children. A study of opposing predictions of the long-term effects of parental caregiving is suggested.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24.  2
    Jennifer M. Shutter & Linda A. Camras (2010). Complexities in the Study of Infant Emotional Facial Expressions. Emotion Review 2 (2):137-138.
    In the target article, we reviewed empirical evidence regarding the relationship between facial expressions and emotion in infancy. In our response to commentators, we make three main points. First, we concur with Hertenstein that the field has thus far relied too heavily on deductive reasoning, and suggest that future research strike a balance between inductive and deductive reasoning. Second, we maintain that infant recognition of discrete emotions remains an open question. Third, we state our position regarding the revised (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25.  3
    Eva G. Krumhuber, Arvid Kappas & Antony S. R. Manstead (2013). Effects of Dynamic Aspects of Facial Expressions: A Review. Emotion Review 5 (1):41-46.
    A key feature of facial behavior is its dynamic quality. However, most previous research has been limited to the use of static images of prototypical expressive patterns. This article explores the role of facial dynamics in the perception of emotions, reviewing relevant empirical evidence demonstrating that dynamic information improves coherence in the identification of affect (particularly for degraded and subtle stimuli), leads to higher emotion judgments (i.e., intensity and arousal), and helps to differentiate between genuine and fake (...). The findings underline that using static expressions not only poses problems of ecological validity, but also limits our understanding of what facial activity does. Implications for future research on facial activity, particularly for social neuroscience and affective computing, are discussed. (shrink)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  26. Paul Ekman (1999). Facial Expressions. In Tim Dalgleish & M. J. Powers (eds.), Handbook of Cognition and Emotion. Wiley 16--301.
  27. Simon van Rysewyk (2009). Comment On: Unconscious Affective Processing and Empathy: An Investigation of Subliminal Priming on the Detection of Painful Facial Expressions [Pain 2009; 1–2: 71–75]. PAIN 145:364-366.
  28. Georg Stenberg, Susanne Wiking & Mats Dahl (1998). Judging Words at Face Value: Interference in a Word Processing Task Reveals Automatic Processing of Affective Facial Expressions. Cognition and Emotion 12 (6):755-782.
  29.  5
    Elaine Fox, Victoria Lester, Riccardo Russo, R. J. Bowles, Alessio Pichler & Kevin Dutton (2000). Facial Expressions of Emotion: Are Angry Faces Detected More Efficiently? Cognition and Emotion 14 (1):61-92.
  30.  3
    Hillary Anger Elfenbein (2013). Nonverbal Dialects and Accents in Facial Expressions of Emotion. Emotion Review 5 (1):90-96.
    This article focuses on a theoretical account integrating classic and recent findings on the communication of emotions across cultures: a dialect theory of emotion. Dialect theory uses a linguistic metaphor to argue emotion is a universal language with subtly different dialects. As in verbal language, it is more challenging to understand someone speaking a different dialect—which fits with empirical support for an in-group advantage, whereby individuals are more accurate judging emotional expressions from their own cultural group versus foreign groups. (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  31.  6
    Timothy D. Sweeny, Marcia Grabowecky, Satoru Suzuki & Ken A. Paller (2009). Long-Lasting Effects of Subliminal Affective Priming From Facial Expressions. Consciousness and Cognition 18 (4):929-938.
    Unconscious processing of stimuli with emotional content can bias affective judgments. Is this subliminal affective priming merely a transient phenomenon manifested in fleeting perceptual changes, or are long-lasting effects also induced? To address this question, we investigated memory for surprise faces 24 h after they had been shown with 30-ms fearful, happy, or neutral faces. Surprise faces subliminally primed by happy faces were initially rated as more positive, and were later remembered better, than those primed by fearful or neutral faces. (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  32.  2
    Brendan P. Bradley, Karin Mogg, Sara J. Falla & Lucy R. Hamilton (1998). Attentional Bias for Threatening Facial Expressions in Anxiety: Manipulation of Stimulus Duration. Cognition and Emotion 12 (6):737-753.
  33.  2
    Karin Mogg & Brendan P. Bradley (1999). Orienting of Attention to Threatening Facial Expressions Presented Under Conditions of Restricted Awareness. Cognition and Emotion 13 (6):713-740.
  34.  19
    Carroll E. Izard (2002). Continuity and Change in Infants' Facial Expressions Following an Unanticipated Aversive Stimulus. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (4):463-464.
    I agree with Williams that evolutionary theory provides the best account of the pain expression. We may disagree as to whether pain has an emotional dimension or includes discrete basic emotions as integral components. I interpret basic emotion expressions that occur contemporaneously with pain expression as representing separate but highly interactive systems, each with distinct adaptive functions.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35.  4
    Olivia Beaudry, Annie Roy-Charland, Melanie Perron, Isabelle Cormier & Roxane Tapp (2014). Featural Processing in Recognition of Emotional Facial Expressions. Cognition and Emotion 28 (3):416-432.
  36.  5
    Eva Gilboa-Schechtman, Edna B. Foa & Nader Amir (1999). Attentional Biases for Facial Expressions in Social Phobia: The Face-in-the-Crowd Paradigm. Cognition and Emotion 13 (3):305-318.
  37.  6
    Francisco Esteves, Ulf Dimberg & Arne öhman (1994). Automatically Elicited Fear: Conditioned Skin Conductance Responses to Masked Facial Expressions. Cognition and Emotion 8 (5):393-413.
  38.  4
    Nancy L. Etcoff & John J. Magee (1992). Categorical Perception of Facial Expressions. Cognition 44 (3):227-240.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   25 citations  
  39.  2
    James W. Tanaka, Martha D. Kaiser, Sean Butler & Richard Le Grand (2012). Mixed Emotions: Holistic and Analytic Perception of Facial Expressions. Cognition and Emotion 26 (6):961-977.
  40.  10
    Dacher Keltner (1996). Evidence for the Distinctness of Embarrassment, Shame, and Guilt: A Study of Recalled Antecedents and Facial Expressions of Emotion. Cognition and Emotion 10 (2):155-172.
  41. Lotte F. van Dillen, Lasana T. Harris, Wilco W. van Dijk & Mark Rotteveel (2015). Looking with Different Eyes: The Psychological Meaning of Categorisation Goals Moderates Facial Reactivity to Facial Expressions. Cognition and Emotion 29 (8):1382-1400.
  42.  4
    Klaus R. Scherer & Didier Grandjean (2008). Facial Expressions Allow Inference of Both Emotions and Their Components. Cognition and Emotion 22 (5):789-801.
  43.  11
    Nathan Ridout, Arlene Astell, Ian Reid, Tom Glen & Ronan O'Carroll (2003). Memory Bias for Emotional Facial Expressions in Major Depression. Cognition and Emotion 17 (1):101-122.
  44.  1
    Lemke Leyman, Rudi De Raedt, Roel Vaeyens & Renaat M. Philippaerts (2011). Attention for Emotional Facial Expressions in Dysphoria: An Eye-Movement Registration Study. Cognition and Emotion 25 (1):111-120.
  45.  23
    George Bonanno & Dacher Keltner (2004). Brief Report The Coherence of Emotion Systems: Comparing “on‐Line” Measures of Appraisal and Facial Expressions, and Self‐Report. Cognition and Emotion 18 (3):431-444.
  46.  1
    Murray White (1995). Preattentive Analysis of Facial Expressions of Emotion. Cognition and Emotion 9 (5):439-460.
  47.  7
    Laura Visu-Petra, Ioana Ţincaş, Lavinia Cheie & Oana Benga (2010). Anxiety and Visual-Spatial Memory Updating in Young Children: An Investigation Using Emotional Facial Expressions. Cognition and Emotion 24 (2):223-240.
  48.  7
    C. Fabian Benitez-Quiroz, Ronnie B. Wilbur & Aleix M. Martinez (2016). The Not Face: A Grammaticalization of Facial Expressions of Emotion. Cognition 150:77-84.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  49.  18
    Wataru Sato & Sakiko Yoshikawa (2007). Spontaneous Facial Mimicry in Response to Dynamic Facial Expressions. Cognition 104 (1):1-18.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  50.  1
    Wataru Sato & Sakiko Yoshikawa (2004). Brief Report the Dynamic Aspects of Emotional Facial Expressions. Cognition and Emotion 18 (5):701-710.
1 — 50 / 1000