Search results for 'Facial Expressions' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Galina V. Paramei David L. Bimler, Slawomir J. Skwarek (2013). Processing Facial Expressions of Emotion: Upright Vs. Inverted Images. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 240.0
    We studied discrimination of briefly presented Upright vs. Inverted emotional facial expressions (FEs), hypothesising that inversion would impair emotion decoding by disrupting holistic FE processing. Stimuli were photographs of seven emotion prototypes, of a male and female poser (Ekman and Friesen, 1976), and eight intermediate morphs in each set. Subjects made speeded Same/Different judgements of emotional content for all Upright (U) or Inverted (I) pairs of FEs, presented for 500 ms, 100 times each pair. Signal Detection Theory revealed (...)
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  2. Yossi Zana William E. Comfort, Meng Wang, Christopher P. Benton (2013). Processing of Fear and Anger Facial Expressions: The Role of Spatial Frequency. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 240.0
    Spatial frequency (SF) components encode a portion of the affective value expressed in face images. The aim of this study was to estimate the relative weight of specific frequency spectrum bandwidth on the discrimination of anger and fear facial expressions. The general paradigm was a classification of the expression of faces morphed at varying proportions between anger and fear images in which SF adaptation and SF subtraction are expected to shift classification of facial emotion. A series of (...)
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  3. Luigi Trojano Massimiliano Conson, Marta Ponari, Eva Monteforte, Giusy Ricciato, Marco Sarà, Dario Grossi (2013). Explicit Recognition of Emotional Facial Expressions is Shaped by Expertise: Evidence From Professional Actors. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 240.0
    Can reading others’ emotional states be shaped by expertise? We assessed processing of emotional facial expressions in professional actors trained either to voluntary activate mimicry to reproduce character’s emotions (as foreseen by the “Mimic Method”), or to infer others’ inner states from reading the emotional context (as foreseen by “Stanislavski Method”). In explicit recognition of facial expressions (Experiment 1), the two experimental groups differed from each other and from a control group with no acting experience: the (...)
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  4. Verena Willenbockel, Franco Lepore, Dang Khoa Nguyen, Alain Bouthillier & Frédéric Gosselin (2012). Spatial Frequency Tuning During the Conscious and Non-Conscious Perception of Emotional Facial Expressions – An Intracranial ERP Study. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 240.0
    Previous studies have shown that complex visual stimuli, such as emotional facial expressions, can influence brain activity independently of the observers’ awareness. Little is known yet, however, about the “informational correlates” of consciousness—i.e., which low-level information correlates with brain activation during conscious vs. non-conscious perception. Here, we investigated this question in the spatial frequency (SF) domain. We examined which SFs in disgusted and fearful facial expressions modulate activation in the insula and amygdala over time and as (...)
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  5. Xiaoqing Gao, Daphne Maurer & Mayu Nishimura (2013). Altered Representation of Facial Expressions After Early Visual Deprivation. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 216.0
    We investigated the effects of early visual deprivation on the underlying representation of the six basic emotions. Using multi-dimensional scaling (MDS), we compared the similarity judgments of adults who had missed early visual input because of bilateral congenital cataracts to control adults with normal vision. Participants made similarity judgments of the six basic emotional expressions, plus neutral, at three different intensities. Consistent with previous studies, the similarity judgments of typical adults could be modeled with four underlying dimensions, which can (...)
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  6. U. Dimberg, M. Thunberg & K. Elmehed (2000). Unconscious Facial Reactions to Emotional Facial Expressions. Psychological Science 11 (1):86-89.score: 210.0
  7. Catherine M. Herba, Maike Heining, Andrew W. Young, Michael Browning, Philip J. Benson, Mary L. Phillips & Jeffrey A. Gray (2007). Conscious and Nonconscious Discrimination of Facial Expressions. Visual Cognition 15 (1):36-47.score: 210.0
  8. John D. Eastwood & Daniel Smilek (2005). Functional Consequences of Perceiving Facial Expressions of Emotion Without Awareness. Consciousness and Cognition 14 (3):565-584.score: 210.0
  9. Trygg Engen & Nissim Levy (1956). Constant-Sum Judgments of Facial Expressions. Journal of Experimental Psychology 51 (6):396.score: 210.0
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  10. Harold Schlosberg (1952). The Description of Facial Expressions in Terms of Two Dimensions. Journal of Experimental Psychology 44 (4):229.score: 210.0
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  11. Robert P. Abelson & Vello Sermat (1962). Multidimensional Scaling of Facial Expressions. Journal of Experimental Psychology 63 (6):546.score: 210.0
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  12. H. Scholsberg (1941). A Scale for the Judgment of Facial Expressions. Journal of Experimental Psychology 29 (6):497.score: 210.0
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  13. Piia Astikainen, Fengyu Cong, Tapani Ristaniemi & Jari K. Hietanen (2013). Event-Related Potentials to Unattended Changes in Facial Expressions: Detection of Regularity Violations or Encoding of Emotions? Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 210.0
  14. Trygg Engen, Nissim Levy & Harold Schlosberg (1958). The Dimensional Analysis of a New Series of Facial Expressions. Journal of Experimental Psychology 55 (5):454.score: 210.0
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  15. Elaine Fox (2002). Processing Emotional Facial Expressions: The Role of Anxiety and Awareness. Cognitive, Affective and Behavioral Neuroscience 2 (1):52-63.score: 210.0
  16. Silvia Magrelli, Patrick Jermann, Basilio Noris, François Ansermet, François Hentsch, Jacqueline Nadel & Aude Billard (2013). Social Orienting of Children with Autism to Facial Expressions and Speech: A Study with a Wearable Eye-Tracker in Naturalistic Settings. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 210.0
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  17. Lennart Sjoberg (1968). Unidimensional Scaling of Multidimensional Facial Expressions. Journal of Experimental Psychology 78 (3p1):429.score: 210.0
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  18. R. Kitada, Y. Okamoto, A. T. Sasaki, T. Kochiyama, M. Miyahara, S. J. Lederman & N. Sadato (2012). Early Visual Experience and the Recognition of Basic Facial Expressions: Involvement of the Middle Temporal and Inferior Frontal Gyri During Haptic Identification by the Early Blind. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7:7-7.score: 208.0
    Face perception is critical for social communication. Given its fundamental importance in the course of evolution, the innate neural mechanisms can anticipate the computations necessary for representing faces. However, the effect of visual deprivation on the formation of neural mechanisms that underlie face perception is largely unknown. We previously showed that sighted individuals can recognize basic facial expressions by haptics surprisingly well. Moreover, the inferior frontal gyrus and posterior superior temporal sulcus in the sighted subjects are involved in (...)
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  19. Eeva Anita Elliott & Arthur M. Jacobs (2013). Facial Expressions, Emotions, and Sign Languages. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 208.0
    Facial expressions are used by humans to convey various types of meaning in various contexts. The range of meanings spans basic possibly innate socio-emotional concepts such as ‘surprise’ to complex and culture specific concepts such as ‘carelessly’. The range of contexts in which humans use facial expressions spans responses to events in the environment to particular linguistic constructions within sign languages. In this mini review we summarize findings on the use and acquisition of facial (...) by signers and present a unified account of the range of facial expressions used by positing three dimensions; semantic, iconic and compositional. (shrink)
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  20. Caterina Artuso, Paola Palladino & Paola Ricciardelli (2012). How Do We Update Faces? Effects of Gaze Direction and Facial Expressions on Working Memory Updating. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 204.0
    The aim of the study was to investigate how the biological binding between different facial dimensions, and their social and communicative relevance, may impact updating processes in working memory (WM). We focused on WM updating because it plays a key role in ongoing processing. Gaze direction and facial expression are crucial and changeable components of face processing. Direct gaze enhances the processing of approach-oriented facial emotional expressions (e.g. joy), while averted gaze enhances the processing of avoidance-oriented (...)
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  21. Paola Ricciardelli Caterina Artuso, Paola Palladino (2012). How Do We Update Faces? Effects of Gaze Direction and Facial Expressions on Working Memory Updating. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 204.0
    The aim of the study was to investigate how the biological binding between different facial dimensions, and their social and communicative relevance, may impact updating processes in working memory (WM). We focused on WM updating because it plays a key role in ongoing processing. Gaze direction and facial expression are crucial and changeable components of face processing. Direct gaze enhances the processing of approach-oriented facial emotional expressions (e.g. joy), while averted gaze enhances the processing of avoidance-oriented (...)
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  22. Axel Cleeremans, Change Blindness to Gradual Changes in Facial Expressions.score: 180.0
    Change blindness—our inability to detect changes in a stimulus—occurs even when the change takes place gradually, without disruption (Simons et al., 2000). Such gradual changes are more difficult to detect than changes that involve a disruption. In this experiment, we extend previous findings to the domain of facial expressions of emotions occurring in the context of a realistic scene. Even with changes occurring in central, highly relevant stimuli such as faces, gradual changes still produced high levels of change (...)
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  23. Silvia Rigato & Teresa Farroni (2013). The Role of Gaze in the Processing of Emotional Facial Expressions. Emotion Review 5 (1):36-40.score: 180.0
    Gaze plays a fundamental role in the processing of facial expressions from birth. Gaze direction is a crucial part of the social signal encoded in and decoded from faces. The ability to discriminate gaze direction, already evident early in life, is essential for the development of more complex socially relevant tasks, such as joint and shared attention. At the same time, facial expressions play a fundamental role in the encoding of gaze direction and, when combined, expression (...)
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  24. Carl L. von Baeyer (2002). Children's Facial Expressions of Pain in the Context of Complex Social Interactions. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (4):473-474.score: 180.0
    In children experiencing pain, the study of the social context of facial expressions might help to evaluate evolutionary and conditioning hypotheses of behavioural development. Social motivations and influences may be complex, as seen in studies of children having their ears pierced, and in studies of everyday pain in children. A study of opposing predictions of the long-term effects of parental caregiving is suggested.
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  25. Paul J. Whalen, Hannah Raila, Randi Bennett, Alison Mattek, Annemarie Brown, James Taylor, Michelle van Tieghem, Alexandra Tanner, Matthew Miner & Amy Palmer (2013). Neuroscience and Facial Expressions of Emotion: The Role of Amygdala–Prefrontal Interactions. Emotion Review 5 (1):78-83.score: 180.0
    The aim of this review is to show the fruitfulness of using images of facial expressions as experimental stimuli in order to study how neural systems support biologically relevant learning as it relates to social interactions. Here we consider facial expressions as naturally conditioned stimuli which, when presented in experimental paradigms, evoke activation in amygdala–prefrontal neural circuits that serve to decipher the predictive meaning of the expressions. Facial expressions offer a relatively innocuous strategy (...)
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  26. Sherri C. Widen (2013). Children's Interpretation of Facial Expressions: The Long Path From Valence-Based to Specific Discrete Categories. Emotion Review 5 (1):72-77.score: 180.0
    According to a common sense theory, facial expressions signal specific emotions to people of all ages and therefore provide children easy access to the emotions of those around them. The evidence, however, does not support that account. Instead, children’s understanding of facial expressions is poor and changes qualitatively and slowly over the course of development. Initially, children divide facial expressions into two simple categories (feels good, feels bad). These broad categories are then gradually differentiated (...)
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  27. Zsófia Ruttkay (2009). Cultural Dialects of Real and Synthetic Emotional Facial Expressions. AI and Society 24 (3):307-315.score: 180.0
    In this article we discuss the aspects of designing facial expressions for virtual humans (VHs) with a specific culture. First we explore the notion of cultures and its relevance for applications with a VH. Then we give a general scheme of designing emotional facial expressions, and identify the stages where a human is involved, either as a real person with some specific role, or as a VH displaying facial expressions. We discuss how the display (...)
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  28. Jennifer M. Shutter & Linda A. Camras (2010). Complexities in the Study of Infant Emotional Facial Expressions. Emotion Review 2 (2):137-138.score: 180.0
    In the target article, we reviewed empirical evidence regarding the relationship between facial expressions and emotion in infancy. In our response to commentators, we make three main points. First, we concur with Hertenstein that the field has thus far relied too heavily on deductive reasoning, and suggest that future research strike a balance between inductive and deductive reasoning. Second, we maintain that infant recognition of discrete emotions remains an open question. Third, we state our position regarding the revised (...)
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  29. Linda A. Camras & Jennifer M. Shutter (2010). Emotional Facial Expressions in Infancy. Emotion Review 2 (2):120-129.score: 180.0
    In this article, we review empirical evidence regarding the relationship between facial expression and emotion during infancy. We focus on differential emotions theory’s view of this relationship because of its theoretical and methodological prominence. We conclude that current evidence fails to support its proposal regarding a set of pre-specified facial expressions that invariably reflect a corresponding set of discrete emotions in infants. Instead, the relationship between facial expression and emotion appears to be more complex. Some (...) expressions may have different meanings in infants than in children and adults. In addition, nonemotion factors may sometimes lead to the production of “emotional” facial expressions. We consider alternative perspectives on the nature of emotion and emotional expression in infancy with particular focus on differentiation and dynamical systems approaches. (shrink)
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  30. Ran R. Hassin, Hillel Aviezer & Shlomo Bentin (2013). Inherently Ambiguous: Facial Expressions of Emotions, in Context. Emotion Review 5 (1):60-65.score: 180.0
    With a few yet increasing number of exceptions, the cognitive sciences enthusiastically endorsed the idea that there are basic facial expressions of emotions that are created by specific configurations of facial muscles. We review evidence that suggests an inherent role for context in emotion perception. Context does not merely change emotion perception at the edges; it leads to radical categorical changes. The reviewed findings suggest that configurations of facial muscles are inherently ambiguous, and they call for (...)
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  31. Roberto Caldara (2010). Beyond Smiles: The Impact of Culture and Race in Embodying and Decoding Facial Expressions. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (6):438-439.score: 180.0
    Understanding the very nature of the smile with an integrative approach and a novel model is a fertile ground for a new theoretical vision and insights. However, from this perspective, I challenge the authors to integrate culture and race in their model, because both factors would impact upon the embodying and decoding of facial expressions.
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  32. Andrea Kobiella, Tobias Grossmann, Vincent M. Reid & Tricia Striano (2008). The Discrimination of Angry and Fearful Facial Expressions in 7-Month-Old Infants: An Event-Related Potential Study. Cognition and Emotion 22 (1):134-146.score: 180.0
    (2008). The discrimination of angry and fearful facial expressions in 7-month-old infants: An event-related potential study. Cognition & Emotion: Vol. 22, No. 1, pp. 134-146.
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  33. Vanessa LoBue, Judy S. DeLoache & Jacob Miguel Vigil (2009). On the Detection of Emotional Facial Expressions: Are Girls Really Better Than Boys? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (5):397.score: 180.0
    One facet of Vigil's socio-relational framework of expressive behaviors (SRFB) suggests that females are more sensitive to facial expressions than are males, and should detect facial expressions more quickly. A re-examination of recent research with children demonstrates that girls do detect various facial expressions more quickly than do boys. Although this provides support for SRFB, further examination of SRFB in children would lend important support this evolutionary-based theory.
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  34. Anna Wierzbicka (2000). The Semantics of Human Facial Expressions. Pragmatics and Cognition 8 (1):147-184.score: 180.0
    This paper points out that a major shift of paradigm is currently going on in the study of the human face and it seeks to articulate and to develop the fundamental assumptions underlying this shift. The main theses of the paper are: 1) Facial expressions can convey meanings comparable to the meanings of verbal utterances. 2) Semantic analysis (whether of verbal utterances or of facial expressions) must distinguish between the context-independent invariant and its contextual interpretations. 3) (...)
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  35. Simon van Rysewyk (2009). Comment On: Unconscious Affective Processing and Empathy: An Investigation of Subliminal Priming on the Detection of Painful Facial Expressions [Pain 2009; 1–2: 71–75]. PAIN 145:364-366.score: 178.0
  36. Eva G. Krumhuber, Arvid Kappas & Antony S. R. Manstead (2013). Effects of Dynamic Aspects of Facial Expressions: A Review. Emotion Review 5 (1):41-46.score: 174.0
    A key feature of facial behavior is its dynamic quality. However, most previous research has been limited to the use of static images of prototypical expressive patterns. This article explores the role of facial dynamics in the perception of emotions, reviewing relevant empirical evidence demonstrating that dynamic information improves coherence in the identification of affect (particularly for degraded and subtle stimuli), leads to higher emotion judgments (i.e., intensity and arousal), and helps to differentiate between genuine and fake (...). The findings underline that using static expressions not only poses problems of ecological validity, but also limits our understanding of what facial activity does. Implications for future research on facial activity, particularly for social neuroscience and affective computing, are discussed. (shrink)
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  37. Geoff Hammond Michelle Marneweck, Andrea Loftus (2013). Psychophysical Measures of Sensitivity to Facial Expression of Emotion. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 160.0
    We report the development of two simple, objective, psychophysical measures of the ability to discriminate facial expressions of emotion that vary in intensity from a neutral facial expression and to discriminate between varying intensities of emotional facial expression. The stimuli were created by morphing photographs of models expressing four basic emotions, anger, disgust, happiness and sadness with neutral expressions. Psychometric functions were obtained for 15 healthy young adults using the Method of Constant Stimuli with a (...)
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  38. Carroll E. Izard (2002). Continuity and Change in Infants' Facial Expressions Following an Unanticipated Aversive Stimulus. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (4):463-464.score: 156.0
    I agree with Williams that evolutionary theory provides the best account of the pain expression. We may disagree as to whether pain has an emotional dimension or includes discrete basic emotions as integral components. I interpret basic emotion expressions that occur contemporaneously with pain expression as representing separate but highly interactive systems, each with distinct adaptive functions.
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  39. Hillary Anger Elfenbein (2013). Nonverbal Dialects and Accents in Facial Expressions of Emotion. Emotion Review 5 (1):90-96.score: 156.0
    This article focuses on a theoretical account integrating classic and recent findings on the communication of emotions across cultures: a dialect theory of emotion. Dialect theory uses a linguistic metaphor to argue emotion is a universal language with subtly different dialects. As in verbal language, it is more challenging to understand someone speaking a different dialect—which fits with empirical support for an in-group advantage, whereby individuals are more accurate judging emotional expressions from their own cultural group versus foreign groups. (...)
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  40. Beatrice de Gelder Bernard M. C. Stienen (2011). Fear Modulates Visual Awareness Similarly for Facial and Bodily Expressions. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 5.score: 154.0
    Background Social interaction depends on a multitude of signals carrying information about the emotional state of others. Past research has focused on the perception of facial expressions while perception of whole body signals has only been studied recently. The relative importance of facial and bodily signals is still poorly understood. In order to better understand the relative contribution of affective signals from the face only or from the rest of the body we used a binocular rivalry experiment. (...)
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  41. Mark D. Sullivan (2002). The Meaning of Facial Expressions of Pain Lies in Their Use, Not in Their Reference. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (4):472-473.score: 150.0
    As a product of natural selection, pain behavior must serve an adaptive function for the species beyond the accurate portrayal of the pain experience. Pain behavior does not simply refer to the pain experience, but promotes survival of the species in various and complex ways. This means that there is no purely respondent or operant pain behavior found in nature.
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  42. Hietanen Jari (2011). Visual Event-Related Potentials to Facial Expressions in Depressed and Non-Depressed Subjects. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 5.score: 150.0
  43. D. Matsumoto & M. Lee (1993). Consciousness, Volition, and the Neuropsychology of Facial Expressions of Emotion. Consciousness and Cognition 2 (3):237-54.score: 150.0
  44. Timothy D. Sweeny, Marcia Grabowecky, Satoru Suzuki & Ken A. Paller (2009). Long-Lasting Effects of Subliminal Affective Priming From Facial Expressions. Consciousness and Cognition 18 (4):929-938.score: 150.0
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  45. María-Angeles Ruiz-Belda, José-Miguel Fernández-Dols, Pilar Carrera & Kim Barchard (2003). Spontaneous Facial Expressions of Happy Bowlers and Soccer Fans. Cognition and Emotion 17 (2):315-326.score: 150.0
  46. Michelle Yik, Sherri C. Widen & James A. Russell (2013). The Within-Subjects Design in the Study of Facial Expressions. Cognition and Emotion 27 (6):1062-1072.score: 150.0
  47. Olivia Beaudry, Annie Roy-Charland, Melanie Perron, Isabelle Cormier & Roxane Tapp (forthcoming). Featural Processing in Recognition of Emotional Facial Expressions. Cognition and Emotion:1-17.score: 150.0
  48. Holger Hoffmann, Harald C. Traue, Franziska Bachmayr & Henrik Kessler (2010). Perceived Realism of Dynamic Facial Expressions of Emotion: Optimal Durations for the Presentation of Emotional Onsets and Offsets. Cognition and Emotion 24 (8):1369-1376.score: 150.0
  49. Giulia Buodo, Giovanni Mento, Michela Sarlo & Daniela Palomba (forthcoming). Neural Correlates of Attention to Emotional Facial Expressions in Dysphoria. Cognition and Emotion:1-17.score: 150.0
  50. A. J. Calder, A. W. Young, D. Rowland, D. R. Gibbenson, B. M. Hayes & D. I. Perrett (1996). Perception of Photographic-Quality Caricatures of Emotional Facial Expressions. In Enrique Villanueva (ed.), Perception. Ridgeview. 44-45.score: 150.0
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