Search results for 'Faculty' (try it on Scholar)

999 found
Sort by:
  1. John M. Collins (2005). Faculty Disputes. Mind and Language 19 (5):503-33.score: 24.0
    Jerry Fodor, among others, has maintained that Chomsky's language faculty hypothesis is an epistemological proposal, i.e. the faculty comprises propositional structures known (cognized) by the speaker/hearer. Fodor contrasts this notion of a faculty with an architectural (directly causally efficacious) notion of a module. The paper offers an independent characterisation of the language faculty as an abstractly specified nonpropositional structure of the mind/brain that mediates between sound and meaning—a function in intension that maps to a pair of (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Nell Adkins & Robin R. Radtke (2004). Students' and Faculty Members' Perceptions of the Importance of Business Ethics and Accounting Ethics Education: Is There an Expectations Gap? [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 51 (3):279-300.score: 24.0
    Despite a wealth of prior research (e.g., Wynd and Mager, 1989; Weber, 1990; Harris, 1991; Harris and Guffey, 1991; McCabe et al., 1991; Murphy and Boatright, 1994; Gautschi and Jones, 1998), little consensus has arisen about the goals and effectiveness of business ethics education. Additionally, accounting academics have recently been questioned as to their commitment to accounting ethics education (Gunz and McCutcheon, 1998). The current study examines whether accounting students' perceptions of business ethics and the goals of accounting (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Laura Davis & Mark Usry (2011). Faculty Selling Desk Copies—The Textbook Industry, the Law and the Ethics. Journal of Academic Ethics 9 (1):19-31.score: 24.0
    It is a guilty secret that many college professors sell the complimentary desk copies that they receive from textbook publishers for cash. This article attempts to shed light on the undercover practice by looking at the resale of complimentary textbooks by faculty from four perspectives. Part One provides an overview of the college textbook industry, the business reasons that motivate publishers to provide complimentary desk copies to faculty, and the economic consequences of the entry of the textbooks into (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Marc Hauser, Chomsky D., Fitch Noam & W. Tecumseh (2002). The Faculty of Language: What is It, Who has It, and How Did It Evolve? Science 298 (22):1569-1579.score: 24.0
    We argue that an understanding of the faculty of language requires substantial interdisciplinary cooperation. We suggest how current developments in linguistics can be profitably wedded to work in evolutionary biology, anthropology, psychology, and neuroscience. We submit that a distinction should be made between the faculty of language in the broad sense (FLB)and in the narrow sense (FLN). FLB includes a sensory-motor system, a conceptual-intentional system, and the computational mechanisms for recursion, providing the capacity to generate an infinite range (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. John Collins (2009). The Limits of Conceivability: Logical Cognitivism and the Language Faculty. Synthese 171 (1):175 - 194.score: 24.0
    Robert Hanna (Rationality and logic. MIT Press, Cambridge, 2006) articulates and defends the thesis of logical cognitivism, the claim that human logical competence is grounded in a cognitive faculty (in Chomsky’s sense) that is not naturalistically explicable. This position is intended to steer us between the Scylla of logical Platonism and the Charybdis of logical naturalism (/psychologism). The paper argues that Hanna’s interpretation of Chomsky is mistaken. Read aright, Chomsky’s position offers a defensible version of naturalism, one Hanna may (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Arthur Coren (2011). Turning a Blind Eye: Faculty Who Ignore Student Cheating. [REVIEW] Journal of Academic Ethics 9 (4):291-305.score: 24.0
    In this study, 40.3% of faculty members admitted to ignoring student cheating on one or more occasions. The quality of past experience in dealing with academic integrity violations was examined. Faculty members with previous bad experiences were more likely to prefer dealing with cheating by ignoring it. The data were further analysed to determine beliefs and attitudes that distinguish between faculty who have never ignored an instance of cheating and those who indicated that they have ignored one (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Stephen J. Ceci, Wendy M. Williams & Katrin Mueller-Johnson (2006). Is Tenure Justified? An Experimental Study of Faculty Beliefs About Tenure, Promotion, and Academic Freedom. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (6):553-569.score: 24.0
    The behavioral sciences have come under attack for writings and speech that affront sensitivities. At such times, academic freedom and tenure are invoked to forestall efforts to censure and terminate jobs. We review the history and controversy surrounding academic freedom and tenure, and explore their meaning across different fields, at different institutions, and at different ranks. In a multifactoral experimental survey, 1,004 randomly selected faculty members from top-ranked institutions were asked how colleagues would typically respond when confronted with dilemmas (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Cindy Poore-Pariseau (2009). Should Faculty Members Be Exempt From a Mandate to Receive Instructional Design Training Because of Their Rights Under Academic Freedom? Journal of Academic Ethics 7 (3):223-230.score: 24.0
    The quality of the educational experience for students may be at risk if they are not taught in ways that are effective and pertinent. While educational institutions (administrators, faculty senates or a combination) may try to compel faculty members to gain knowledge of and utilize up-to-date learning and instructional design strategies, these faculty members may baulk at this mandate, citing academic freedom as their right to design their courses in any way they see fit. Following is a (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Corrine R. Sackett (2010). Authorship in Student-Faculty Collaborative Research: Perceptions of Current and Best Practices. [REVIEW] Journal of Academic Ethics 8 (3):199-215.score: 24.0
    Determining appropriate authorship recognition in student-faculty collaborative research is a complex task. In this quantitative study, responses from 1346 students and faculty in education and some social science disciplines at 36 research-intensive institutions in the United States were analyzed to provide a description of current and recommended practices for authorship in student-faculty collaborative research. The responses revealed practices and perceptions that are not aligned with ethical guidelines and a lack of consensus among respondents about appropriate practice. (...) and student respondents agreed that students deserve more authorship recognition than they get in common practice but they did not agree on the appropriate authorship arrangement for several of the collaborative scenarios described in the study or on the relative value of various contributions to research projects. The misalignment with ethical codes and lack of consensus among the respondents is problematic because student-faculty collaborative research is common and authored publications are powerful indicators of research competency. With these detailed results, students and faculty can better anticipate areas where their perspectives are likely to differ and faculty can work to clarify ambiguous expectations. (shrink)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Katinka de Wet (2010). The Importance of Ethical Appraisal in Social Science Research: Reviewing a Faculty of Humanities' Research Ethics Committee. [REVIEW] Journal of Academic Ethics 8 (4):301-314.score: 24.0
    Research Ethics Committees (RECs) or Institutional Review Boards (IRBs) are rapidly becoming indispensable mechanisms in the overall workings of university institutions. In fact, the ethical dimension is an important aspect of research governance processes present in institutions of higher learning. However, it is often deemed that research in the social sciences do not require ethical appraisal or clearance, because of the alleged absence of harm in conducting such research. This is an erroneous and dangerous assumption given that research in social (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Teressa L. Elliott, Linda M. Marquis & Catherine S. Neal (2013). Business Ethics Perspectives: Faculty Plagiarism and Fraud. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 112 (1):91-99.score: 24.0
    Faculty plagiarism and fraud are widely documented occurrences but little analysis has been conducted. This article addresses the question of why faculty plagiarism and fraud occurs and suggests approaches on how to develop an environment where faculty misconduct is socially inappropriate. The authors review relevant literature, primarily in business ethics and student cheating, developing action steps that could be applied to higher education. Based upon research in these areas, the authors posit some actions that would be appropriate (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Laura Welfare & Corrine Sackett (2010). Authorship in Student-Faculty Collaborative Research: Perceptions of Current and Best Practices. [REVIEW] Journal of Academic Ethics 8 (3):199-215.score: 24.0
    Determining appropriate authorship recognition in student-faculty collaborative research is a complex task. In this quantitative study, responses from 1346 students and faculty in education and some social science disciplines at 36 research-intensive institutions in the United States were analyzed to provide a description of current and recommended practices for authorship in student-faculty collaborative research. The responses revealed practices and perceptions that are not aligned with ethical guidelines and a lack of consensus among respondents about appropriate practice. (...) and student respondents agreed that students deserve more authorship recognition than they get in common practice but they did not agree on the appropriate authorship arrangement for several of the collaborative scenarios described in the study or on the relative value of various contributions to research projects. The misalignment with ethical codes and lack of consensus among the respondents is problematic because student-faculty collaborative research is common and authored publications are powerful indicators of research competency. With these detailed results, students and faculty can better anticipate areas where their perspectives are likely to differ and faculty can work to clarify ambiguous expectations. (shrink)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. June Poon & Raja Ainuddin (2011). Selected Ethical Issues in the Analysis and Reporting of Research: Survey of Business School Faculty in Malaysia. [REVIEW] Journal of Academic Ethics 9 (4):307-322.score: 24.0
    This study reports the perceptions of business school faculty on ethical behaviors related to data analysis and research reporting as well as the prevalence of such behaviors in their academic environment. Survey data for the study were obtained from a sample of 102 business school faculty from five government-funded universities in Malaysia. Study results showed that a majority of the respondents considered practices such as fabrication, manipulation, and distortion of data to be ethically unacceptable, and these behaviors were (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Sandra L. Titus & Janice M. Ballou (2013). Faculty Members' Perceptions of Advising Versus Mentoring: Does the Name Matter? [REVIEW] Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (3):1267-1281.score: 24.0
    The recommendations, during the past 20 years, to improve PhD scientific training and graduate school success, have focused on the significance of mentoring. It is well established that PhD students with mentors have significantly more success in graduate school as demonstrated by publishing papers before they graduate and by making presentations. Have faculty and academic institutions embraced the mentoring role? This study explores the views of 3,500 scientists who have primary responsibilities to educate PhD and MD/PhD students. Faculty (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Melissa S. Anderson (2000). Normative Orientations of University Faculty and Doctoral Students. Science and Engineering Ethics 6 (4):443-461.score: 24.0
    Data from two national surveys of 4,000 faculty and doctoral students in chemistry, civil engineering, microbiology and sociology indicate that both faculty and students subscribe strongly to traditional norms but are more likely to see alternative counternorms enacted in their departments. They also show significant effects of departmental climate on normative orientations and suggest that many researchers express some degree of ambivalence about traditional norms.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Y. Ilker Topcu (2010). Have Ethical Perceptions Changed? A Comparative Study on the Ethical Perceptions of Turkish Faculty Members. Journal of Academic Ethics 8 (2):137-151.score: 24.0
    This study presents a comparative investigation of ethical perceptions of the faculty members, working in selected departments of Turkish universities. A descriptive research design is used in order to reveal the perceptions regarding the ethical dilemmas related to instruction, research, and outside employment activities in both 2003 and 2008. The set of activities that are considered unethical by faculty members, as well as the occurrence of potential ethical dilemmas are identified on a comparative basis. According to the findings (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Arthur Coren (2012). The Theory of Planned Behaviour: Will Faculty Confront Students Who Cheat? [REVIEW] Journal of Academic Ethics 10 (3):171-184.score: 24.0
    Dealing with students who cheat can be one of the most stressful interactions that faculty encounter. This study focused on faculty responses to academic integrity violations and utilized the Theory of Planned Behaviour model to predict the target behaviour of whether faculty would speak face-to-face with a student suspected of cheating. After an elicitation phase to determine modal salient beliefs, a questionnaire was developed to measure the model’s variables. The respondent database contained 206 tenured and non-tenured (...) from two large comprehensive universities. A stepwise multiple regression demonstrated the usefulness of the Theory of Planned Behaviour. Overall the model explained 43 % of the variance in predicting faculty members’ intention to speak face-to-face with a student suspected of cheating. The most significant contribution was made by subjective norms ( β = 0.39), followed by attitude ( β = 0.34), and perceived behavioural control ( β = 0.24). (shrink)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Ove D. Jakobsen, Knut J. Ims & Kjell Grønhaug (2005). Faculty Members' Attitudes Towards Ethics at Norwegian Business Schools: An Explorative Study. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 62 (3):299 - 314.score: 24.0
    A survey of recent research reveals that there is a growing interest in knowledge regarding the opinions and attitudes toward ethics amongst business school faculty members. Based on an empirical study conducted in Norway we address the following issue: “What do faculty members of the Norwegian Business Schools consider to be their responsibilities in preparing their students for leading positions in public and private organizations?” Moving on to interpreting the results from the survey, we discuss the empirical findings (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Melissa S. Anderson, Elo Charity Oju & Tina M. R. Falkner (2001). Help From Faculty: Findings From the Acadia Institute Graduate Education Study. Science and Engineering Ethics 7 (4):487-503.score: 24.0
    Doctoral students receive many kinds of assistance from faculty members, but much of this support falls short of mentoring. This paper takes the perspective that it is more important to find out what kinds of help students receive from faculty than to assume that students are taken care of by mentors, as distinct from advisors or role models. The findings here are based on both survey and interview data collected through the Acadia Institute’s project on Professional Values and (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Linda A. Kidwell & Roland E. Kidwell (2008). Do the Numbers Add Up to Different Views? Perceptions of Ethical Faculty Behavior Among Faculty in Quantitative Versus Qualitative Disciplines. Journal of Business Ethics 78 (1-2):141 - 151.score: 24.0
    Faculty across a wide range of academic disciplines at 89 AASCB-accredited U.S. business schools were surveyed regarding their perceptions of the ethical nature of faculty behaviors related to undergraduate course content, student evaluation, educational environment, research issues, financial and material transactions, and social and sexual relationships. We analyzed responses based on whether instruction in the academic discipline focused mainly on quantitative topics or largely on qualitative issues. Faculty who represented quantitative disciplines such as accounting and finance (n (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Colleen Halupa & Doris U. Bolliger (2013). Faculty Perceptions of Student Self Plagiarism: An Exploratory Multi-University Study. [REVIEW] Journal of Academic Ethics 11 (4):297-310.score: 24.0
    The purpose of this research study was to evaluate faculty perceptions regarding student self-plagiarism or recycling of student papers. Although there is a plethora of information on plagiarism and faculty who self-plagiarize in publications, there is very little research on how faculty members perceive students re-using all or part of a previously completed assignment in a second assignment. With the wide use of plagiarism detection software, this issue becomes even more crucial. A population of 340 faculty (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Robert Liebler (2012). Student Perceptions of Faculty Use of Cheating Deterrents. Journal of Academic Ethics 10 (4):327-333.score: 24.0
    Evidence is provided on faculty use of cheating deterrents for in-class exams. The evidence comes from a survey of students who report on their most recent in-class exam in a randomly selected course that they are taking. Three types of cheating are considered: (i) advance knowledge of exam questions; (ii) copying; and (iii) other improper student actions during the exam. The deterrents examined consist of the following: (i) a rate of repeating questions; (ii) multiple versions of the exam and (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Alison Cook-Sather & Elliott Shore (2007). Breaking the Rule of Discipline in Interdisciplinarity: Redefining Professors, Students, and Staff as Faculty. Journal of Research Practice 3 (2):Article M15.score: 24.0
    In this article we attempt to complicate traditional--and, we argue, limited and exclusionary--definitions of interdisciplinarity as the bringing into dialogue of established disciplines without questioning the parameters and practices of those disciplines. We propose that interdisciplinarity instead might mean teaching and learning among, between, and in the midst of those of innate or learned capacities--not only college faculty but also students and staff. To illustrate this more radical iteration of interdisciplinarity, we draw on a range of definitions of the (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Matthew C. Sonfield (2014). Academic Plagiarism at the Faculty Level: Legal Versus Ethical Issues and a Case Study. Journal of Academic Ethics 12 (2):75-87.score: 24.0
    Plagiarism by college and university faculty members has become a growing issue and concern in academia. This paper presents a case study of an extreme and clear case of such plagiarism. Yet an analysis of the legal and ethical contexts of such plagiarism, and the specific chronicle of this case, illustrate the complexities and difficulties in dealing with such situations. Implications for researchers, for colleges and universities, and for academic publishers and journals are offered.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Evan Simpson (2003). The Faculty of the Future. Journal of Academic Ethics 1 (1):49-58.score: 24.0
    This paper examines some implications of predicted demographic changes in Canadian universities that may make them unable to replace retiring faculty members in numbers permitting academic business as usual. If the predictions prove correct, it will be desirable to reinterpret received verities about the relationship between professor/student ratios and effective education, the dual roles of teaching and research, and democratic governance in communities of higher education. Possibilities for restructuring inquiry and instruction in ways consistent with the responsibilities of educators (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Jorge Larrosa (2010). Endgame: Reading, Writing, Talking (and Perhaps Thinking) in a Faculty of Education. Educational Philosophy and Theory 42 (5):683-703.score: 21.0
    The article offers a conversation with the ghost of the madman 'Jacotot/Rancière': one of the possible dialogues between the ignorant schoolmaster and my own perplexities in what I feel to be an endgame. Is there any point at the present time, in the declining mercantilist university, in pondering once again the issue of the place of philosophy in institutions responsible for training people who will work in the sphere of education? 'We' knew the old words, so the article goes, but (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Smith (2010). Does Humanity Share a Common Moral Faculty? Journal of Moral Philosophy 7 (1):37-53.score: 21.0
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. C. Strong, S. Connelly & L. R. Sprabery (2012). Prescribing for Co-Workers: Practices and Attitudes of Faculty and Residents. Journal of Clinical Ethics 24 (1):41-49.score: 21.0
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. H. H. Caldwell (1922). Adult Tests of the Stanford Revision Applied to University Faculty Members. Journal of Experimental Psychology 5 (4):247.score: 21.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Joanne C. Jones, Gary Spraakman & Cristóbal Sánchez-Rodríguez (forthcoming). What's in It for Me? An Examination of Accounting Students' Likelihood to Report Faculty Misconduct. Journal of Business Ethics.score: 21.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Matthew McAndrew (2014). Healthy Understanding and Urtheilskraft: The Development of the Power of Judgment in Kant's Early Faculty Psychology. Kant-Studien 105 (3).score: 21.0
  32. David Ellerman, Four Ways From Universal to Particular: How Chomsky's Language-Acquisition Faculty is Not Selectionist.score: 21.0
    Following the development of the selectionist theory of the immune system, there was an attempt to characterize many biological mechanisms as being "selectionist" as juxtaposed to "instructionist." But this broad definition would group Darwinian evolution, the immune system, embryonic development, and Chomsky's language-acquisition mechanism as all being "selectionist." Yet Chomsky's mechanism (and embryonic development) are significantly different from the selectionist mechanisms of biological evolution or the immune system. Surprisingly, there is a very abstract way using two dual mathematical logics to (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. W. Tecumseh Fitch, Marc Hauser, Chomsky D. & Noam (2005). The Evolution of the Language Faculty: Clarifications and Implications. Cognition 97:179-210.score: 21.0
  34. Herbert Woodrow (1916). The Faculty of Attention. Journal of Experimental Psychology 1 (4):285.score: 21.0
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Ray Jackendoff, What is the Human Language Faculty? Two Views.score: 18.0
    In addition to providing an account of the empirical facts of language, a theory that aspires to account for language as a biologically based human faculty should seek a graceful integration of linguistic phenomena with what is known about other human cognitive capacities and about the character of brain computation. The present article compares the theoretical stance of biolinguistics (Chomsky 2005, Di Sciullo and Boeckx 2011) with a constraint-based Parallel Architecture approach to the language faculty (Jackendoff 2002, Culicover (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Mark Johnson (2011). There is No Moral Faculty. Philosophical Psychology 25 (3):409 - 432.score: 18.0
    Dewey's ethical naturalism has provided an exemplary model for many contemporary naturalistic treatments of morality. However, in some recent work there is an unfortunate tendency to presuppose a moral faculty as the alleged source of what are claimed to be nearly universal moral judgments. Marc Hauser's Moral minds (2006) thus argues that our shared moral intuitions arise from a universal moral organ, which he analogizes to a Chomskyan language faculty. Following Dewey's challenge to the postulation of the idea (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Steven D. Hales (2012). The Faculty of Intuition. Analytic Philosophy 53 (2):180-207.score: 18.0
    The present paper offers an analogical support for the use of rational intuition, namely, if we regard sense perception as a mental faculty that (in general) delivers justified beliefs, then we should treat intuition in the same manner. I will argue that both the cognitive marks of intuition and the role it traditionally plays in epistemology are strongly analogous to that of perception, and barring specific arguments to the contrary, we should treat rational intuition as a source of prima (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Ray Jackendoff (2005). The Nature of the Language Faculty and its Implications for Evolution of Language (Reply to Fitch, Hauser, and Chomsky). Cognition 97 (2):211-225.score: 18.0
    In a continuation of the conversation with Fitch, Chomsky, and Hauser on the evolution of language, we examine their defense of the claim that the uniquely human, language-specific part of the language faculty (the “narrow language faculty”) consists only of recursion, and that this part cannot be considered an adaptation to communication. We argue that their characterization of the narrow language faculty is problematic for many reasons, including its dichotomization of cognitive capacities into those that are utterly (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Steven Pinker (2005). The Nature of the Language Faculty and its Implications for Evolution of Language (Reply to Fitch, Hauser, and Chomsky). Cognition 97 (2):211-225.score: 18.0
    In a continuation of the conversation with Fitch, Chomsky, and Hauser on the evolution of language, we examine their defense of the claim that the uniquely human, language-specific part of the language faculty (the “narrow language faculty”) consists only of recursion, and that this part cannot be considered an adaptation to communication. We argue that their characterization of the narrow language faculty is problematic for many reasons, including its dichotomization of cognitive capacities into those that are utterly (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Dick Allen (2003). Crossing the Picket Line: A Brief Faculty Memoir of the Historic University of Bridgeport Strike. [REVIEW] Journal of Academic Ethics 1 (3):331-339.score: 18.0
    This memoir provides the personal story of a tenured poet who initially walked the picket line during the 1990 University of Bridgeport faculty strike. During the strike's second week, he made the difficult decision to cross the picket line of a union he helped create seventeen years earlier. He continually relives his strike experience.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Alfred G. Gerteiny (2003). The Longest Faculty Strike in the History of U.S. Institutions of Higher Education: Perceptions of the Union President. [REVIEW] Journal of Academic Ethics 1 (3):273-285.score: 18.0
    The president of the AAUP faculty union at University of Bridgeport, from 1987 to 1991, offers a first-hand account of the circumstances leading to the fatal strike there. He refutes accusations that the union and its leadership destroyed the university and provides a dramatic, personal account of a faculty union under attack by union busters. The faculty, he argues, was resisting a concerted onslaught on traditional faculty rights. It fought desperately to stifle a retrograde revolution in (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Peter Vallentyne & John Accordino (1998). Teaching Non-Philosophy Faculty to Teach Critical Thinking About Ethical Issues. Liberal Education 84 (2):46-51.score: 18.0
    At various universities across the country, philosophers are organizing faculty development workshops for non-philosophy faculty members who want to incorporate critical thinking about ethical and social justice issues into their courses. The demand for such programs is reasonably strong. In part this is due to the increasing pressure from professional associations (e.g., those of nursing and accounting) for the inclusion of ethics in the curriculum. In part, however, it is simply due to the recognition by faculty members (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Patricia R. Owen & Jennifer Zwahr-Castro (2007). Boundary Issues in Academia: Student Perceptions of Faculty - Student Boundary Crossings. Ethics and Behavior 17 (2):117 – 129.score: 18.0
    Boundary crossings in academia are rarely addressed by university policy despite the risk of problematic or unethical faculty - student interactions. This study contributes to an understanding of undergraduate college student perceptions of appropriateness of faculty - student nonsexual interactions by investigating the influence of gender and ethnicity on student judgments of the appropriateness of numerous hypothetical interactions. Overall, students deemed the majority of interactions as inappropriate. Female students judged a number of interactions as more inappropriate than did (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. A. W. Moore (2003). Noble in Reason, Infinite in Faculty: Themes and Variations in Kant's Moral and Religious Philosophy. Routledge.score: 18.0
    In this bold and innovative new work, Adrian Moore provides a refreshing but challenging new interpretation of Kant's moral philosophy and argues that it can enrich our understanding of a central problem in contemporary ethical debate: the problem of rationality. Noble in Reason, Infinite in Faculty is essential reading for all those interested in Kant, ethics and philosophy of religion.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Abraham C. Flipse (2008). Against the Science–Religion Conflict: The Genesis of a Calvinist Science Faculty in the Netherlands in the Early Twentieth Century. Annals of Science 65 (3):363-391.score: 18.0
    Summary This paper gives an account of the establishment and expansion of a Faculty of Science at the Calvinist ?Free University? in the Netherlands in the 1930s. It describes the efforts of a group of orthodox Christians to come to terms with the natural sciences in the early twentieth century. The statutes of the university, which had been founded in 1880, prescribed that all research and teaching should be based on Calvinist, biblical principles. This ideal was formulated in opposition (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Ruth Anne Baumgartner (2003). Orienteering in Wonderland: Ethical Decision-Making by Faculty in the UB Strike. [REVIEW] Journal of Academic Ethics 1 (3):295-322.score: 18.0
    The University of Bridgeport, like many other universities, inappropriately adopted a corporate model of faculty relations. But faculty members have multiple obligations: to their profession, discipline, students, public, self, and each other, in addition to their institution. These multiple obligations justified the actions taken by striking faculty. Faculty loyalty is not to an administration, and not ultimately even to their institution: it is to the truth, to the integrity of the profession, and to themselves.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Chet Robie & Roland E. Kidwell (2003). The “Ethical” Professor and the Undergraduate Student: Current Perceptions of Moral Behavior Among Business School Faculty. [REVIEW] Journal of Academic Ethics 1 (2):153-173.score: 18.0
    A survey of 830 faculty members at 89 AASCB-accredited business schools throughout the United States was conducted in Fall 2002 to develop a snapshot of perceptions of ethical and unethical conduct with regard to undergraduate business instruction across a wide range of business disciplines. These behaviors fell into such categories as course content, evaluation of students, educational environment, disrespectful behavior, research and publication issues, financial and material transactions, social relationships with students, and sexual relationships with students and other (...). Of the 55 behaviors, two were almost universally perceived to be unethical. Eight behaviors were controversial in that there was wide variance on whether the behavior was perceived to be unethical. In addition, females' ethical perceptions differed significantly from males on three behaviors; older participants differed from younger participants on seven behaviors; participants at research-oriented institutions differed from participants at teaching-oriented institutions on one behavior; and tenured, untenured tenure-track, and untenured non-tenure-track participants differed on three behaviors. The findings of this study and the detailed comments of the respondents provide a starting point for discussing more systematic means to consider ethical issues within collegiate schools of business. (shrink)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Denis Collins (2003). Power Dynamics Between Administrators and Faculty on a Unionized Campus: A Case Study. [REVIEW] Journal of Academic Ethics 1 (3):239-266.score: 18.0
    This article offers a case study of labor relations in a higher education setting. The University of Bridgeport's faculty union was certified in May 1973 and decertified in August 1992. Contract negotiation disputes centered on shared governance, managing faculty reductions during a time of inflation and declining enrollments, and determining fair wages. The private university experienced four faculty strikes, culminating in a two-year faculty strike – the longest in U.S. higher education history. The university was also (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Renate R. Mai-Dalton (1987). The Experiences of One Faculty Member in a Business Ethics Seminar: What Can We Take Back to the Classroom? [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 6 (7):509 - 511.score: 18.0
    The author's experiences in an ethics seminar for business school faculty are described. Conclusions from the dynamics of the participants' interactions are drawn and recommendations are made for teaching business school students about ethics.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Laura L. Beauvais, David E. Desplaces, David E. Melchar & Susan M. Bosco (2007). Business Faculty Perceptions and Actions Regarding Ethics Education. Journal of Academic Ethics 5 (1):121-136.score: 18.0
    This paper examines faculty perceptions regarding ethical behavior among colleagues and students, and faculty practices with regard to teaching ethics in three institutions over a 4-year period. Faculty reported an uneven pattern of unethical behavior among colleagues over the period. A majority of business courses included ethics, however as both a specific topic on the syllabus and within course discussions. The percentage of courses with ethics discussions increased in 2006, however, the time allocated to these discussions decreased. (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 999