Search results for 'Fairy tales History and criticism' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. R. G. Collingwood (2005). The Philosophy of Enchantment: Studies in Folktale, Cultural Criticism, and Anthropology. Oxford University Press.score: 450.0
    This is the long-awaited publication of a set of writings by the British philosopher, historian, and archaeologist R.G. Collingwood (1889-1943) on critical, anthropological, and cultural themes only hinted at in his previously available work. At the core are six essays on folktale and magic in which Collingwood applies the principles of his philosophy of history to problems in the long-term evolution of human society and culture. The volume opens with three substantial introductory essays by the editors, authorities in their (...)
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  2. Mark Miller (2004). Philosophical Chaucer: Love, Sex, and Agency in the Canterbury Tales. Cambridge University Press.score: 198.0
    While most Chaucer critics interested in gender and sexuality have used psychoanalytic theory to analyze Chaucer's poetry, Mark Miller re-examines the links between sexuality and the philosophical analysis of agency in medieval texts such as the Canterbury Tales, Boethius's Consolation of Philosophy, and the Romance of the Rose. Chaucer's philosophical sophistication provides the basis for a new interpretation of the emerging notions of sexual desire and romantic love in the late Middle Ages.
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  3. Thomas Richard Fahy (ed.) (2010). The Philosophy of Horror. University Press of Kentucky.score: 162.0
    Inviting readers to ponder this genre's various manifestations since the late 1700s, this collection of probing essays allows fans and philosophy buffs alike to ...
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  4. Andrew Smith (2000). Gothic Radicalism: Literature, Philosophy, and Psychoanalysis in the Nineteenth Century. St. Martin's Press.score: 162.0
    Applying ideas drawn from contemporary critical theory, this book historicizes psychoanalysis through a new and significant theorization of the Gothic. The central premise is that the nineteenth-century Gothic produced a radical critique of accounts of sublimity and Freudian psychoanalysis. This book makes a major contribution to an understanding of both the nineteenth century and the Gothic discourse which challenged the dominant ideas of that period. Writers explored include Mary Shelley, Edgar Allan Poe, Robert Louis Stevenson, and Bram Stoker.
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  5. Angelica Nuzzo (2007). Life and Death in the History of Philosophy: Brandom’s Tales of the Mighty Dead. Philosophy and Social Criticism 33 (1):35-53.score: 153.0
    This article discusses the role that history and historiography play in Brandom’s Tales of the Mighty Dead . I claim that Brandom’s attempt to integrate a historical dimension in his inferentialist project fails, and argue that the reason for that failure lies in the misconstruction and misreading of Hegel’s idea of rationality with regard, at least, to two fundamental points: to the Hegelian concept of ‘history’ and to his notion of the ‘social’. The further point that I (...)
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  6. Shira Wolosky (2013). The Irresistible Fairy Tale: The Cultural and Social History of a Genre. Common Knowledge 19 (3):579-579.score: 133.5
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  7. Shira Wolosky (2013). The Irresistible Fairy Tale: The Cultural and Social History of a Genre by Jack Zipes (Review). Common Knowledge 19 (3):579-579.score: 133.5
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  8. P. H. Brazier (2011). Fantasy, Myth and the Measure of Truth. Tales of Pullman, Lewis, Tolkien, MacDonald and Hoffman. By William Gray and Tolkien, Race and Cultural History. From Fairies to Hobbits. By Dimitra Fimi. [REVIEW] Heythrop Journal 52 (6):1076-1077.score: 129.0
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  9. Graham Harman (2011). The Road to Objects. Continent 3 (1):171-179.score: 120.0
    continent. 1.3 (2011): 171-179. Since 2007 there has been a great deal of interest in speculative realism, launched in the spring of that year at a well-attended workshop in London. It was always a loose arrangement of people who shared few explicit doctrines and no intellectual heroes except the horror writer H.P. Lovecraft, an improbable patron saint for a school of metaphysics. Lovecraft serves as a sort of mascot for the “speculative” part of speculative realism, since his grotesque semi-Euclidean monsters (...)
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  10. Dorota Heck (2010). Four Dilemmas: Theory, Criticism, History, Faith: Sketches on the Threshold of Literary Anthropology. Księgarnia Akademicka.score: 120.0
    Dilemma one, Between the theoretical concepts and authorial intention -- Dilemma two, Good manners and eristic -- Dilemma three, Between strangeness and familiarity -- Dilemma four, Between scholarly research and faith.
     
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  11. John Karabelas (2012). Collingwood, Fairy Tales and Totemism: A Historical Study on the Origins of European Religion (and Society). Collingwood and British Idealism Studies 17 (2):203-223.score: 108.0
    This paper suggests that Collingwood's fairy tales writings can be read as a historical study on the origins of European religion. His interest in fairy tales belongs to a clear tradition, whose members include John Ruskin, Benedetto Croce and most importantly Giambattista Vico, that realised the potential of fairy tales as evidence for historical knowledge. In this context fairy tales should be understood as myths that are not symbols but truthful, poetically expressed, (...)
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  12. Martin Cohen (2008). Philosophical Tales: Being an Alternative History Revealing the Characters, the Plots, and the Hidden Scenes That Make Up the True Story of Philosophy. Blackwell Pub..score: 108.0
    Did Plato really write those Socratic Dialogues – or was it Socrates after all? Why is it doubtful that Descartes ever really uttered, “I think, therefore I am”? And what did Sartre ever have against waiters, anyway? The history of philosophy is filled with great tales – many of them fictions, misrepresentations, falsehoods, lies and fibs. Or are they just misstatements, prevarications, and narratives not entirely based on fact? In the true spirit of a broad philosophical debate, Philosophical (...)
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  13. Pat O'Connor (1989). Images and Motifs in Children's Fairy Tales. Educational Studies 15 (2):129-144.score: 108.0
    Summary Fairy tales are widely used by teachers and parents in helping children to read. The Ladybird Well?Loved Tales series is particularly popular and widely available in schools and supermarkets. The paper argues that the stereotypical images of women put forward in these tales is one element in contributing to females? negative and stereotypical views of themselves and limited definitions of their identities and roles. It also argues that the consolation implicit in such tales need (...)
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  14. Sean B. Carroll (2009). Remarkable Creatures: Epic Adventures in the Search for the Origins of Species. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt.score: 103.5
    An award-wining biologist takes us on the dramatic expeditions that unearthed the history of life on our planet. Just 150 years ago,most of our world was an unexplored wilderness.Our sense of how old it was? Vague and vastly off the mark. And our sense of our own species’ history? A set of fantastic myths and fairy tales. Fossils had been known for millennia, but they were seen as the bones of dragons and other imagined creatures. In (...)
     
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  15. Gunnar Andersson (1994). Criticism and the History of Science: Kuhn's, Lakatos's, and Feyrabend's Criticisms of Critical Rationalism. E.J. Brill.score: 96.0
    In "Criticism and the History of Science" Karl Popper's falsificationist conception of science is developed and defended against criticisms raised by Thomas ...
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  16. Joshua Kates (2008). Fielding Derrida: Philosophy, Literary Criticism, History, and the Work of Deconstruction. Fordham University Press.score: 96.0
    Introduction: Fielding Derrida -- Jacques Derrida's early writings : alongside skepticism, phenomenology -- Analytic philosophy, and literary criticism -- Deconstruction as skepticism -- Derrida, Husserl, and the commentators : a developmental approach -- A transcendental sense of death : Derrida and the philosophy of language -- Literary theory's languages : the deconstruction of sense vs. the deconstruction of reference -- Jacques Derrida and the problem of philosophical and political modernity -- Jacob Klein and Jacques Derrida : the problem of (...)
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  17. Michael Laing (2011). Sam Kean: The Disappearing Spoon: And Other True Tales of Madness, Love, and the History of the World From the Periodic Table of the Elements. [REVIEW] Foundations of Chemistry 13 (1):77-77.score: 96.0
    Sam Kean: The disappearing spoon: and other true tales of madness, love, and the history of the world from the periodic table of the elements Content Type Journal Article Pages 77-77 DOI 10.1007/s10698-010-9101-x Authors Michael Laing, School of Pure and Applied Chemistry, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, 4041 South Africa Journal Foundations of Chemistry Online ISSN 1572-8463 Print ISSN 1386-4238 Journal Volume Volume 13 Journal Issue Volume 13, Number 1.
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  18. Kevin Karnes (2008). Music, Criticism, and the Challenge of History: Shaping Modern Musical Thought in Late Nineteenth-Century Vienna. OUP USA.score: 96.0
    More than a century after Guido Adler's appointment to the first chair in musicology at the University of Vienna, Music, Criticism, and the Challenge of History provides a first look at the discipline in this earliest period, and at the ideological dilemmas and methodological anxieties that characterized it upon its institutionalization. Author Kevin Karnes contends that some of the most vital questions surrounding musicology's disciplinary identities today-the relationship between musicology and criticism, the role of the subject in (...)
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  19. Alun Munslow (2006). Biography and History : Criticism, Theory and Practice. In A. L. Macfie (ed.), The Philosophy of History: Talks Given at the Institute of Historical Research, London, 2000-2006. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 87.0
     
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  20. Kathryn Pauly Morgan (2011). Foucault, Ugly Ducklings, and Technoswans: Analyzing Fat Hatred, Weight-Loss Surgery, and Compulsory Biomedicalized Aesthetics in America. International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 4 (1):188-220.score: 85.5
    Once upon a time, an ugly duckling became famous in the history of European fairy tales. It was said of him that "… the poor duckling, who had come last out of his eggshell, and was so ugly, was bitten, pecked, and teased by both ducks and hens.… The poor thing scarcely knew what to do; he was quite distressed because he was so ugly."Today, in America—the mecca of MakeOver culture—that ugly duckling would know exactly what to (...)
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  21. Bruno Vanobbergen & Paul Smeyers (2007). On Cioran's Criticism of Utopian Thinking and the History of Education. Educational Philosophy and Theory 39 (1):44–55.score: 84.0
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  22. Paul E. Kerry (2010). Thomas Carlyle Resartus: Reappraising Carlyle's Contribution to the Philosophy of History, Political Theory, and Cultural Criticism. Fairleigh Dickinson University Press.score: 84.0
    Acknowledgments T HOMAS CARLYLE MIGHT HAVE HAD MANY CURMUDGEONLY QUALITIES, but this certainly does not extend to the scholars who research him. ...
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  23. John Earman (1978). Fairy Tales Vs an Ongoing Story: Ramsey's Neglected Argument for Scientific Realism. [REVIEW] Philosophical Studies 33 (2):195 - 202.score: 81.0
  24. Roger Pearson (1993). The Fables of Reason: A Study of Voltaire's "Contes Philosophiques". Oxford University Press.score: 81.0
    This is the first comprehensive study in English of Voltaire's contes philosophiques--the philosophical tales for which he is best remembered and which include his masterpiece Candide. Pearson situates each story in its historical and intellectual context and offers new readings in light of modern critical thinking. He rejects the traditional view that Voltaire's contes were the private expression of his philosophical perplexity, and argues that it is narrative that is Voltaire's essential mode of thought. His book is a witty, (...)
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  25. Howard Hampton (2007). Born in Flames: Termite Dreams, Dialectical Fairy Tales, and Pop Apocalypses. Harvard University Press.score: 81.0
    From the scorched-earth works of action-movie provocateurs Seijun Suzuki and Sam Peckinpah to the cargo cult soundscapes of Pere Ubu and the Czech dissidents ...
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  26. George J. Annas (1988). Fairy Tales Surrogate Mothers Tell. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 16 (1-2):27-33.score: 81.0
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  27. Julia V. Douthwaite (2002). The Wild Girl, Natural Man, and the Monster: Dangerous Experiments in the Age of Enlightenment. University of Chicago Press.score: 81.0
    This study looks at the lives of the most famous "wild children" of eighteenth-century Europe, showing how they open a window onto European ideas about the potential and perfectibility of mankind. Julia V. Douthwaite recounts reports of feral children such as the wild girl of Champagne (captured in 1731 and baptized as Marie-Angelique Leblanc), offering a fascinating glimpse into beliefs about the difference between man and beast and the means once used to civilize the uncivilized. A variety of educational experiments (...)
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  28. Evan I. Schwartz (2009). Finding Oz: How L. Frank Baum Discovered the Great American Story. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt.score: 81.0
    Finding Oz tells the remarkable story behind one of the world’s most enduring and best-loved books. Offering profound new insights into the true origins and meaning of L. Frank Baum’s 1900 masterwork, it delves into the personal turmoil and spiritual transformation that fueled Baum’s fantastical parable of the American Dream. Before becoming an impresario of children’s adventure tales, the J. K. Rowling of his age, Baum failed at a series of careers and nearly lost his soul before setting out (...)
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  29. David W. Fagerberg (2005). The Owl, the Raven, and the Dove: The Religious Meaning of the Grimms' Magic Fairy Tales, by G. Ronald Murphy, S.J. The Chesterton Review 31 (3/4):256-259.score: 81.0
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  30. Peter Milward (2013). The Fantasy of Fairy Tales. The Chesterton Review 39 (3):227-230.score: 81.0
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  31. Tim Whitmarsh (2002). Fairy Tales G. Anderson: Fairytale in the Ancient World . Pp. XI + 240. London and New York: Routledge, 2000. Paper, £16.99. Isbn: 0-415-23703-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 52 (01):34-.score: 81.0
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  32. David Blamires (2013). Grimms' Fairy Tales in English: A Forgotten Edition. Bulletin of the John Rylands Library 89 (2):5-13.score: 81.0
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  33. A. Caldwell (1997). Fairy Tales for Politics: The Other, Once More. Philosophy Today 41 (1):40-50.score: 81.0
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  34. Allan Carlson (2002). Agrarian Fairy Tales. The Chesterton Review 28 (3):353-359.score: 81.0
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  35. G. K. Chesterton (2002). Education by Fairy Tales. The Chesterton Review 28 (1/2):7-10.score: 81.0
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  36. G. K. Chesterton (2005). Fairy Tales. The Chesterton Review 31 (3/4):7-9.score: 81.0
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  37. D. Cross (1981). Breaking the Magic Spell: Radical Theories of Folk and Fairy Tales. Telos 1981 (47):218-228.score: 81.0
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  38. Vigen Guroian (2005). On the Moral Imagination of Fairy Tales. The Chesterton Review 31 (3/4):33-45.score: 81.0
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  39. Colin Richmond (2010). Lucky Hans and Other Merz Fairy Tales. Common Knowledge 16 (3):562-562.score: 81.0
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  40. Tim Whitmarsh (forthcoming). Fairy Tales. Classical Review.score: 81.0
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  41. J. Zipes (1977). The Uses of Enchantment: The Meaning and Importance of Fairy Tales. Telos 1977 (32):215-224.score: 81.0
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  42. David Blamers (2013). Grimms' Fairy Tales in English: A Forgotten Edition. Bulletin of the John Rylands Library 89 (2):5 - 13.score: 81.0
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  43. G. K. Chesterton (2002). The Ethics of Fairy Tales. The Chesterton Review 28 (1/2):15-18.score: 81.0
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  44. Albrecht Classen (ed.) (2010). Laughter in the Middle Ages and Early Modern Times: Epistemology of a Fundamental Human Behavior, its Meaning, and Consequences. Walter de Gruyter.score: 81.0
    Introduction: Laughter as an expression of human nature in the Middle Ages and the early modern period: literary, historical, theological, philosophical, and psychological reflections -- Judith Hagen. Laughter in Procopius's wars -- Livnat Holtzman. "Does God really laugh?": appropriate and inappropriate descriptions of God in Islamic traditionalist theology -- Daniel F. Pigg. Laughter in Beowulf: ambiguity, ambivalence, and group identity formation -- Mark Burde. The parodia sacra problem and medieval comic studies -- Olga V. Trokhimenko. Women's laughter and gender politics (...)
     
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  45. Siân Echard (2008). Jan M. Ziolkowski, Fairy Tales From Before Fairy Tales: The Medieval Latin Fast of Wonderful Lies. Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan Press, 2007. Pp. Xii, 500; Black-and-White Frontispiece. $50. [REVIEW] Speculum 83 (3):777-778.score: 81.0
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  46. Leo A. Hetzler (1994). "The Collected Works, Vol. XIV: Short Stories, Fairy Tales, Mystery Stories—Illustrations," by G. K. Chesterton. The Chesterton Review 20 (2):315-317.score: 81.0
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  47. Kay S. Hymowitz (1992). Attempts to Alter Traditional Attitudes Toward Witchcraft and Fairy Tales. The Chesterton Review 18 (1):133-135.score: 81.0
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  48. Alasdair R. Maclean (2008). Magic, Myths, and Fairy Tales : Consent and the Relationship Between Law and Ethics. In Michael D. A. Freeman (ed.), Law and Bioethics / Edited by Michael Freeman. Oxford University Press.score: 81.0
     
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  49. Kevin Marsalek (1995). Humanism, Science Fiction, and Fairy Tales. Free Inquiry 15 (3):39-44.score: 81.0
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  50. Jonathan Padley (2003). Fairy Tales and Dragons. The Chesterton Review 29 (1/2):296-296.score: 81.0
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