Search results for 'Fallibility' (try it on Scholar)

325 found
Sort by:
  1. Jonathan E. Adler (2012). Contextualism and Fallibility: Pragmatic Encroachment, Possibility, and Strength of Epistemic Position. Synthese 188 (2):247-272.score: 24.0
    A critique of conversational epistemic contextualism focusing initially on why pragmatic encroachment for knowledge is to be avoided. The data for pragmatic encroachment by way of greater costs of error and the complementary means to raise standards of introducing counter-possibilities are argued to be accountable for by prudence, fallibility and pragmatics. This theme is sharpened by a contrast in recommendations: holding a number of factors constant, when allegedly higher standards for knowing hold, invariantists still recommend assertion (action), while contextualists (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. John Kaag (2013). Fallibility and Insight in Moral Judgment. Human Studies 36 (2):259-275.score: 24.0
    This article investigates the relationship between moral judgments, fallibility, and imaginative insight. It will draw heavily from the canon of classical American philosophy, the members of which (from Ralph Waldo Emerson, to C.S. Peirce, E.L. Cabot, to Jane Addams, to John Dewey) took up this relationship as pivotally important in moral theorizing. It argues that the process of hypothesis formation—characterized as “insight” by Emerson and extended by Peirce in his notion of “abduction”—is a necessary condition of moral progress for (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Arto Laitinen (2012). Misrecognition, Misrecognition, and Fallibility. Res Publica 18 (1):25-38.score: 24.0
    Misrecognition from other individuals and social institutions is by its dynamic or ‘logic’ such that it can lead to distorted relations-to-self, such as self-hatred, and can truncate the development of the central capabilities of persons. Thus it is worth trying to shed light on how mis recognition differs from adequate recognition, and on how mis recognition might differ from other kinds of mistreatment and disregard. This paper suggests that mis recognition (including nonrecognition) is a matter of inadequate responsiveness to the (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Joachim Widder (1998). The Fallibility of Medical Judgment as a Consequence of the Inexactness of Observations. Medicine, Healthcare and Philosophy 1 (2):119-124.score: 24.0
    The paper attempts to give an account of the fallibility of medical judgments without recourse to the incompleteness of scientific knowledge. It is argued that because of the inexactness of observations and thus the existence of borderline cases any theory applied for explanation and predicition will produce some false results. This state of affairs is independent of the nature of a theory, i.e., it applies both for non-probabilistic and for probabilistic theories. Some epistemological issues and consequences with regard to (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Eugene O. Mills (2002). Fallibility and the Phenomenal Sorites. Noûs 36 (3):384-407.score: 21.0
  6. Henry J. Perkinson (2002). Flight From Fallibility: How Theory Triumphed Over Experience in the West. Praeger.score: 21.0
    Perkinson provides an original historical interpretation that shows how our intellectual, political, economic, and social institutions emerged out of and are ...
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Jack Hasson (1997). Medical Fallibility and the Autopsy in the USA. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 3 (3):229-234.score: 21.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Mariacarla Gadebusch Bondio & Agostino Paravicini Bagliani (eds.) (2012). Errors and Mistakes: A Cultural History of Fallibility. Sismel, Edizioni Del Galluzzo.score: 21.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Göran Duus-Otterström (2010). Fallibility and Retribution. Law and Philosophy 29 (3):337-369.score: 18.0
    The fact that human fallibility virtually ensures that punishment will sometimes befall the innocent presents a theoretical puzzle to all forms of retributivism. Retributivists usually say that desert is a necessary condition for justified punishment. It remains unclear, following this view, how retributivists can support punishment in (imperfect) practice. The paper investigates a number of possible replies available to the retributivist. It concludes that one reply in particular can overcome the problem posed by fallibility, but it is not (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Walter Hopp (2009). Phenomenology and Fallibility. Husserl Studies 25 (1):1-14.score: 18.0
    If Husserl is correct, phenomenological inquiry produces knowledge with an extremely high level of epistemic warrant or justification. However, there are several good reasons to think that we are highly fallible at carrying out phenomenological inquiries. It is extremely difficult to engage in phenomenological investigations, and there are very few substantive phenomenological claims that command a widespread consensus. In what follows, I introduce a distinction between method-fallibility and agent-fallibility, and use it to argue that the fact that we (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Sven Rosenkranz (2013). Fallibility and Trust. Noûs 48 (4).score: 18.0
    I argue that while admission of one's own fallibility rationally requires one's readiness to stand corrected in the light of future evidence, it need have no consequences for one's present degrees of belief. In particular, I argue that one's fallibility in a given area gives one no reason to forego assigning credence 1 to propositions belonging to that area. I can thus be seen to take issue with David Christensen's recent claim that our fallibility has far-reaching consequences (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. By Adam Leite (2004). Is Fallibility an Epistemological Shortcoming? Philosophical Quarterly 54 (215):232–251.score: 18.0
    A familiar form of scepticism supposes that knowledge requires infallibility. Although that requirement plays no role in our ordinary epistemic practices, Barry Stroud has argued that this is not a good reason for rejecting a sceptical argument: our ordinary practices do not correctly reflect the requirements for knowledge because the appropriateness-conditions for knowledge attribution are pragmatic. Recent fashion in contextualist semantics for 'knowledge' agrees with this view of our practice, but incorrectly. Ordinary epistemic evaluations are guided by our conception of (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Yitzhak Benbaji (2006). A New Puzzle About Believed Fallibility. Dialogue 45 (4):679-696.score: 18.0
    I shall consider the phenomenon of believing ourselves to have at least one false belief: a phenomenon I call believed fallibility I shall first present a paradoxical argument which appears to show that believed fallibility is incoherent; second, note that this argument assumes that we are committed to the conjunction of all our beliefs; third, sketch a more intuitive notion of commitment in which we are not committed to the conjunction of all our beliefs and argue that the (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Adam Leite (2004). Is Fallibility an Epistemological Shortcoming? Philosophical Quarterly 54 (215):232 - 251.score: 18.0
    A familiar form of scepticism supposes that knowledge requires infallibility. Although that requirement plays no role in our ordinary epistemic practices, Barry Stroud has argued that this is not a good reason for rejecting a sceptical argument: our ordinary practices do not correctly reflect the requirements for knowledge because the appropriateness-conditions for knowledge attribution are pragmatic. Recent fashion in contextualist semantics for 'knowledge' agrees with this view of our practice, but incorrectly. Ordinary epistemic evaluations are guided by our conception of (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Mark Amadeus Notturno (2014). Soros and Popper: On Fallibility, Reflexivity, and the Unity of Method. Journal of Economic Methodology 20 (4):420-428.score: 18.0
    Let me begin by saying that I think that George Soros is right in identifying fallibility and reflexivity as important phenomena in economic life, and in social life more generally, and as phenomena that mainstream economic theory has largely ignored. I also agree with Soros that economics is an uncertain science. And I think that Soros himself, being one of the world's wealthiest men and most generous philanthropists, deserves credit for being ready and willing to think for himself. It (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Roman Frydman & Michael D. Goldberg (2014). Fallibility in Formal Macroeconomics and Finance Theory. Journal of Economic Methodology 20 (4):386-396.score: 18.0
    This note focuses on George Soros's challenge to macroeconomics and finance theory that any valid methodology of social science must explicitly recognize fallibility in a Knightian sense. We use a simple algebraic example to sketch how extant models formalize fallibility. We argue that contemporary theory's epistemological and empirical difficulties can be traced to assuming away fallibility in a Knightian sense. We also discuss how imperfect knowledge economics provides a way to open mathematical models to such fallibility, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Anton Carpinschi (2009). Recognition Culture and Comprehensive Truth. Towards a Model of Fallibility Assumed. Cultura 6 (2):226-245.score: 18.0
    The aim of this paper is to single out the path towards a model of fallibility assumed by the establishment and implementation of the culture of recognition and comprehensive truth. Starting from the hypostases of the human, this anthropological model defines the fallible human being, the author of the comprehensive truth oriented towards the culture of recognition. The main idea of this demarche is, in fact, that between recognition and comprehension there is a deep, organic connection and the comprehensive (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Sherrilyn Roush, Fallibility and Authority.score: 16.0
    Over the centuries since the modern scientific revolution that started with Copernicus, Galileo, Kepler, and Newton, two things have changed that have required reorientation of our assumptions and re-education of our reflexes. First, we have learned that even the very best science is fallible; eminently successful theories investigated and supported through the best methods, and by the best evidence available, might be not just incomplete but wrong. That is, it is possible to have a justified belief that is false.
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Sherrilyn Roush, Fallibility and Authority in Science.score: 16.0
    Over the centuries since the modern scientific revolution that started with Copernicus, Galileo, Kepler, and Newton, two things have changed that have required reorientation of our assumptions and re-education of our reflexes. First, we have learned that even the very best science is fallible; eminently successful theories investigated and supported through the best methods, and by the best evidence available, might be not just incomplete but wrong. That is, it is possible to have a justified belief that is false. (...)
    No categories
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Robin Jeshion (2002). The Fallibility of Rational Insight. Journal of Philosophical Research 27:301-310.score: 16.0
    In In Defense of Pure Reason [IDPR], BonJour advances a version of moderate rationalism, the thesis that rational insight is an independent, though fallible, source of a priori epistemic justification. To demonstrate that this thesis must obtain, BonJour argues that rational insight is truth conducive and that no infallibilist rationalist theory could be correct. This article aims to establish two points: (1) BonJour’s argument for the fallibilist thesis is problematic because it invokes implausible conditions on justification, conditions that even BonJour (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Alasdair MacIntyre (1976). Toward a Theory of Medical Fallibility. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 1 (1):13-23.score: 15.0
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Lorraine Besser-jones (2008). Social Psychology, Moral Character, and Moral Fallibility. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 76 (2):310–332.score: 15.0
    In recent years, there has been considerable debate in the literature concerning the existence of moral character. One lesson we should take away from these debates is that the concept of character, and the role it plays in guiding our actions, is far more complex than most of us initially took it to be. Just as Gilbert Harman, for example, makes a serious mistake in insisting, plainly and simply, that ther is no such thing as character, defenders of character also (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Samuel Gorovitz (1978). Medical Fallibility: A Rejoinder. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 3 (3):187-191.score: 15.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. S. Gorovitz & A. MacIntyre (1976). Toward a Theory of Medical Fallibility. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 1 (1):51-71.score: 15.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Mark Kaplan (2013). Coming to Terms with Our Human Fallibility: Christensen on the Preface. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 87 (1):1-35.score: 15.0
    No categories
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. George Heffernan (2009). An Addendum to the Exchange with Walter Hopp on Phenomenology and Fallibility. Husserl Studies 25 (1):51-55.score: 15.0
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. James Lenman (2014). Gibbardian Humility: Moral Fallibility and Moral Smugness. Journal of Value Inquiry 48 (2):235-245.score: 15.0
    Those whose Way is not the same cannot take counsel together.Confucius, Analects XV, 40Quasi-Realism and Fundamental Disagreement: Egan’s ProblemI believe that it is wrong to open your boiled egg at the big end. You believe that it is not wrong to open your egg at the big end. We are at an impasse. The impasse might not be deep. One of us might just be wrong on some matter of prosaic nonnormative fact. But perhaps that is not the case. Even (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Keith Lehrer & Kihyeon Kim (1990). The Fallibility Paradox. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 50:99-107.score: 15.0
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. John Symons, Functionalism and Fallibility.score: 15.0
    Functionalism in the philosophy of mind rests on the claim that mental states are multiply realizable; mental states can be realized by or instantiated in a variety of distinct physical structures. To see them as multiply realizable we take mental states as causal roles rather than particular physical structures. As such, functionalism can be contrasted with metaphysical accounts which treat mental states as instances of a mental substance. Instead of puzzling over the relationship between mental and physical kinds, functionalists understand (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Doris Olin (1989). The Fallibility Argument for Inconsistency. Philosophical Studies 56 (1):95 - 102.score: 15.0
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. George Soros (2013). Fallibility, Reflexivity and the Human Uncertainty Principle. Journal of Economic Methodology 20 (4):309-329.score: 15.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Melissa Schwartzberg (2007). Jeremy Bentham on Fallibility and Infallibility. Journal of the History of Ideas 68 (4):562-586.score: 15.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. M. D. Bayles & A. Caplan (1978). Medical Fallibility and Malpractice. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 3 (3):169-186.score: 15.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. John Fisher (1975). Fallibility and Knowledge of the Future. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 36 (1):44-58.score: 15.0
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Gerard Radnitzky (1982). Truth and History in Science: Cognitive Progress in Spite of Pervasive Fallibility. Revista Portuguesa de Filosofia 38 (2/3):253 - 274.score: 15.0
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Arthur Caplan (1978). Medical Fallibility and Malpractice. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 3 (3):169-186.score: 15.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Peter Ludlow & Norah Martin (1993). The Fallibility of First-Person Knowledge of Intentionality. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (1):60.score: 15.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. R. Mathis (2005). Ethics and Evidence Based Medicine: Fallibility and Responsibility in Clinical Science. Journal of Medical Ethics 31 (1):e2-e2.score: 15.0
  39. Jason Turner (2013). PAPEal Fallibility? Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 2 (3):274-280.score: 15.0
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Klaus-Detlev Grothusen (1971). Authority and Fallibility of History. Philosophy and History 4 (1):109-110.score: 15.0
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Efraim Podoksik (2009). The Contract of Fallibility. Contemporary Political Theory 8 (4):394.score: 15.0
  42. Alan Thompson & J. O. Wisdom (1974). The Fallibility of Observation. Dialogue 13 (02):353-354.score: 15.0
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Jonathan E. Adler (2009). Why Fallibility has Not Mattered and How It Could. In Harvey Siegel (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Education. Oxford University Press. 83.score: 15.0
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Marco Borga (1997). From Certainty to Fallibility in Mathematics? In Evandro Agazzi & György Darvas (eds.), Philosophy of Mathematics Today. Kluwer. 39--50.score: 15.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. M. Feher (1990). Fallibility (Comments on P. Klein's “The Virtues of Inconsistency”). Epistemologia 13:337-44.score: 15.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Brian Gregor (2012). Jason A. Mahn , Fortunate Fallibility: Kierkegaard and the Power of Sin . Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 32 (2):114-116.score: 15.0
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Stephen Guest (2007). Objectivity and Value : Legal Arguments and the Fallibility of Judges. In Michael D. A. Freeman & Ross Harrison (eds.), Law and Philosophy. Oxford University Press.score: 15.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Joel J. Kupperman (1988). Ethical Fallibility. Ratio 1 (1):33-46.score: 15.0
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Bonnie Kent (2012). Dispositions and Moral Fallibility: The UnAristotelian Aquinas. History of Philosophy Quarterly 29 (2).score: 15.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. J. Liaschenko (2003). Book Review: Ethics and Evidence-Based Medicine: Fallibility and Responsibility in Clinical Science. [REVIEW] Nursing Ethics 10 (5):569-569.score: 15.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 325