Search results for 'Fanaticism' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  19
    John Arthur Passmore (2003). Fanaticism, Toleration and Philosophy. Journal of Political Philosophy 11 (2):211–222.
    LOOKING through Bertrand Russell's minor writings in McMaster University's Russell Archives I came across this sentence: 'Fanaticism is primarily an intellectual defect...one to which philosophy supplies an intellectual antidote'. This fascinated me the more, as I had just written an ...
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  2.  28
    Didier Pollefeyt (ed.) (2004). Incredible Forgiveness: Christian Ethics Between Fanaticism and Reconciliation. Peeters.
    Christian ethics is threatened today by two opposite dangers: on the one hand, violence by moral and religious fanatics and on the other hand, too-easy ...
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  3.  20
    Y. Jansen (2011). Postsecularism, Piety and Fanaticism: Reflections on Jurgen Habermas' and Saba Mahmood's Critiques of Secularism. Philosophy and Social Criticism 37 (9):977-998.
    This article analyses how recent critiques of secularism in political philosophy and cultural anthropology might productively be combined and contrasted with each other. I will show that Jürgen Habermas' postsecularism takes insufficient account of elementary criticisms of secularism on the part of anthropologists such as Talal Asad and Saba Mahmood. However, I shall also criticize Saba Mahmood’s reading of secularism by arguing that, in the end, she replaces the secular–religious divide with a secularity–piety divide; for example, in her reading of (...)
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  4.  18
    Lee F. Kerckhove (1994). Moral Fanaticism and the Holocaust. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 1 (1):21-25.
    I defend Kant’s moral psychology against John R. Silber’s argument that Kant cannot account for the radical evil of Hitler. Silber’s argument cannot be maintained, I argue, if Kant’s account of theological and moral fanaticism, and the personality of the moral fanatic, are taken into account. I contend that Kant’s writings support an analogy between the fanatical pursuit of religious and moral ideals and Hitler’s fanatical pursuit of an ideal of racial purity. I conclude that Kant’s account of moral (...)
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  5.  20
    Richard Routley (1984). I. On the Alleged Inconsistency, Moral Insensitivity and Fanaticism of Pacifism. Inquiry 27 (1-4):117 – 136.
    All the standard and some esoteric objections to pacifism are refuted, either directly or (as with the charge of impracticality) in outline. Familiar arguments to the inconsistency and irresponsibility of pacifism are shown to turn upon illegitimately construing pacifist activities such as resisting, preventing, and defending as involving violence. Several arguments against pacifism from violence as a lesser evil turn out to be fallacious; some involve the erroneous assumption that violence is the only evil, but some lead into what pacifism (...)
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  6.  21
    Mark Timmons (1984). Act Utilitarianism and the Moral Fanaticism Argument. Philosophical Studies 46 (2):215 - 226.
    One apparently devastating criticism of a whole range of act utilitarian (au) principles is marcus singer's claim that such principles are open to the charge of moral fanaticism, I.E., They commit one to the view that "no action is indifferent or trivial, Every occasion is momentous." this moral fanaticism argument (mfa) is examined in detail. I argue that the mfa is not all that devastating; indeed the act utilitarian can altogether escape the charge of being a fanatic.
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  7.  1
    Renzo Llorente, Hegel's Conception of Fanaticism.
    In this essay I examine Hegel's treatment of religion in the "Philosophy of Right" with the aim of, first, clarifying his view of the proper relation between religion and the state and, second, shedding some light on a few of the remarkable implications of the conceptual approach that he introduces. I focus above all on Hegel's novel and suggestive treatment of fanaticism, which I argue, is of special interest as an illustration of his conception of modernity. The implications of (...)
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  8. Ourida Mostefai & John T. Scott (2009). Rousseau and L’Inf'me: Religion, Toleration, and Fanaticism in the Age of Enlightenment. Rodopi.
    Ecrasez l’infâme! Voltaire’s rallying cry against fanaticism resonates with new force today. Nothing suggests the complex legacy of the Enlightenment more than the struggle of superstition, prejudice, and intolerance advocated by most of the Enlightenment philosophers, regardless of their ideological differences. The aim of this book is to undertake a reconsideration of the controversies surrounding the questions of religion, toleration, and fanaticism in the eighteenth century through an examination of Rousseau’s dialogue with Voltaire. What come to light from (...)
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  9. Chamsy el-Ojeili (2012). Review: Fanaticism: On the Uses of an Idea. [REVIEW] Thesis Eleven 109 (1):115-117.
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  10.  21
    Keith Ansell-Pearson, The Need for Small Doses : Nietzsche, Fanaticism, and Epicureanism.
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  11.  95
    Bernard Reginster (2003). What is a Free Spirit? Nietzsche on Fanaticism. Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 85 (1):51-85.
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  12.  10
    Stuart Clark (2013). The Devil in Disguise: Deception, Delusion, and Fanaticism in the Early English Enlightenment. Common Knowledge 19 (1):134-134.
  13.  59
    Keith Horton (2004). Famine and Fanaticism: A Response to Kekes. Philosophy 79 (2):319-327.
    In this paper, I critically discuss a number of arguments made by John Kekes, in a recent article, against the claim that those of us who are relatively affluent ought to do something for those living in absolute poverty in developing countries. There are, I argue, a variety of problems with Kekes' arguments, but one common thread stems from Kekes' failure to take account of the empirical research that has been conducted on the issues which he discusses.
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  14. George S. Howard & Cody D. Christopherson (2009). Pluralism: An Antidote for Fanaticism, the Delusion of Our Age. Journal of Mind and Behavior 30 (3):139-147.
    William James’s pluralism, when combined with his pragmatism and radical empiricism, is a complete and coherent philosophy of life. James provides an antidote to the excesses of both the extreme realist/objectivist and the extreme constructivist/relativist camps. In this paper, we demonstrate how this is so in a discussion of epistemology and ontology including several extended examples. These examples demonstrate the inescapability of context and background assumptions and the advantages of a pluralist worldview.
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  15.  8
    John Passmore (1990). Enthusiasm and Fanaticism. Social Philosophy Today 3:1-12.
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  16.  19
    Robert K. Fullinwider (1977). Fanaticism and Hare's Moral Theory. Ethics 87 (2):165-173.
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  17.  6
    Frederick J. Crosson (2003). Fanaticism, Politics, and Religion. Philosophy Today 47 (4):441-447.
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  18.  22
    David L. Norton (1977). Can Fanaticism Be Distinguished From Moral Idealism? Review of Metaphysics 30 (3):497 - 507.
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  19.  13
    Beth Lord, Against the Fanaticism of Forces : Kant's Critique of Herder's Spinozism.
  20.  7
    Paul Weithman (2011). Dominant Ends, Fanaticism, and Public Reasoning. Process Studies 40 (2):279-285.
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  21.  4
    Kevin McDonnell (1974). Aquinas and Hare on Fanaticism. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 48:218-227.
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  22.  5
    Rachel Zuckert (2010). Kant's Account of Practical Fanaticism. In Benjamin Lipscomb & James Krueger (eds.), Kant's Moral Metaphysics: God, Freedom, and Immortality. De Gruyter 291.
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  23.  1
    Edward W. James (1981). Butler, Fanaticism and Conscience: Edward W. James. Philosophy 56 (218):517-532.
    Butler refused to be satisfied with just one leading principle, or rational basis for human action, but in the end settled for three: self-love, to provide for our ‘own private good’; benevolence, to consider ‘the good of our fellow creatures’ ; and conscience, ‘to preside and govern’ over our lives as a whole . By so doing he hoped to ensure a completeness to our ethical scheme, so that nothing would be omitted from our moral deliberations. Yet by so doing (...)
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  24.  17
    Gustav Ichheiser (1969). On "Tolerance" and "Fanaticism": A Dilemma. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 29 (3):446-450.
  25.  14
    A. P. Martinich (2000). Religion, Fanaticism, and Liberalism. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 81 (4):409–425.
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  26.  5
    Rodica Frentiu (2010). Yukio Mishima: Thymos Between Aesthetics and Ideological Fanaticism. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 9 (25):69-90.
    This study attempts to explore the possible motivations, both obvious and problematic, behind the ritual suicide (seppuku) committed by the Japanese writer in the name of the Emperor at the Eastern Headquarters of Japan’s Self-Defense Forces in 1970. History does not seem to be a coherent or intelligible process, as man’s struggle for nourishment is most often replaced by thymos, the desire for others to recognize his value or the value system of the ideals or noble purposes he is ready (...)
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  27.  12
    Marcus G. Singer (1984). Consequences, Desirability, and the Moral Fanaticism Argument. Philosophical Studies 46 (2):227 - 237.
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  28.  10
    Edward W. James (1981). Butler, Fanaticism and Conscience. Philosophy 56 (218):517 - 532.
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  29.  4
    Sieradzan Jacek (2009). Reasons why socrates wanted to die fanaticism, wisdom, euthanasia or suicide.(Powody, dla których sokrates chcial umrzec. Fanatyzm, madrosc, eutanazja badz samobyjstwo). [REVIEW] Archeus. Studia Z Bioetyki I Antropologii Filozoficznej 10:5-19.
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  30.  12
    Jan Narveson (1978). Liberalism, Utilitarianism, and Fanaticism: R. M. Hare Defended. Ethics 88 (3):250-259.
  31.  8
    Arthur Schafer (1981). Moral Fanaticism: The Utilitarian's Nightmare? Journal of Social Philosophy 12 (1):3-10.
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  32.  6
    W. Kretschmer (1989). Fanaticism and Mass Hysteria. Philosophy and History 22 (2):181-182.
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  33.  2
    William T. Cavanaugh (2011). The Invention of Fanaticism. Modern Theology 27 (2):226-237.
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  34.  1
    Will Dudley (2013). The Active Fanaticism of Political and Religious Life. In Angelica Nuzzo (ed.), Hegel on Religion and Politics. State University of New York Press 119.
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  35.  6
    Hardy E. Jones (1977). Fanaticism and Moral Reasoning. Journal of Value Inquiry 11 (4):284-291.
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  36.  2
    Gordon D. Marino (1987). Is Madness Truth, Is Fanaticism Faith? International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 22 (1/2):41 - 53.
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  37.  1
    Alan Gettner (1977). Hare and Fanaticism. Ethics 87 (2):160-164.
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  38. M. Bartko (1998). Marian Vaross or the Problem of Fanaticism. Filozofia 53 (2):127-130.
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  39. Pascal Bruckner (2010). Chapter Four. The Fanaticism Of Modesty. In The Tyranny of Guilt: An Essay on Western Masochism. Princeton University Press 87-110.
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  40. Edward Hallett Carr (1938). Karl Marx, a Study in Fanaticism. J. M. Dent & Sons.
     
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  41. Barry Curtis (2004). Religion, Fanaticism and Philosophy. Skepsis: A Journal for Philosophy and Interdisciplinary Research 15 (1).
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  42. Leonidas Donskis (2005). George Orwell: The Anatomy of Fanaticism and Hatred. In Jurate Baranova (ed.), Contemporary Philosophical Discourse in Lithuania. Council for Research in Values and Philosophy 4--71.
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  43. G. G. G. G. (1920). PITT-RIVERS, G. -Conscience and Fanaticism: An Essay on Moral Values. [REVIEW] Mind 29:243.
     
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  44. Jason Kemp Winfree (2012). Sacred Violence and the Death of God Bataille's Lucid Fanaticism. Philosophy Today 56 (2):211-220.
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  45. Paul Kurtz (2006). Hurrah for Freedom of Inquiry: Vital Issues for Secular Humanists Plus The Best Antidote for Religious Fanaticism. Free Inquiry 26:4-7.
     
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  46. J. C. Laursen (1999). Dominique Colas: Civil Society and Fanaticism. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 7:536-538.
     
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  47. J. Parker (2015). Peer-Review Journals, Blogs and Twitter: Addressing Extremism and Offensiveness, Fear and Fanaticism. Arts and Humanities in Higher Education 14 (2):129-133.
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  48. M. Vaross (1998). Gnoseological and Logical Aspects of Fanaticism. Filozofia 53 (2):120-126.
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  49.  47
    Scott Forschler (2007). How to Make Ethical Universalization Tests Work. Journal of Value Inquiry 41 (1):31-43.
    Richard Hare described the "ethical fanatic" as an agent who appeared to be able to rationally universalize morally horrendous values by "fanatically" accepting the consequences of those values even if their universalization harmed the original agent. This challenges the project of basing ethics on universalization tests, as advocated by Hare, Immanuel Kant, and others. Hare later argued that fanatics are irrational by appealing to a "principle of prudence," but this violates his meta-principle of not basing fundamental ethical principles upon intuitions (...)
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  50. Julia Borossa & Ivan Ward (eds.) (2009). Psychoanalysis, Fascism, and Fundamentalism. Edinburgh University Press.
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