Search results for 'Fanaticism' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. John Arthur Passmore (2003). Fanaticism, Toleration and Philosophy. Journal of Political Philosophy 11 (2):211–222.score: 18.0
    LOOKING through Bertrand Russell's minor writings in McMaster University's Russell Archives I came across this sentence: 'Fanaticism is primarily an intellectual defect...one to which philosophy supplies an intellectual antidote'. This fascinated me the more, as I had just written an ...
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  2. Didier Pollefeyt (ed.) (2004). Incredible Forgiveness: Christian Ethics Between Fanaticism and Reconciliation. Peeters.score: 15.0
    Christian ethics is threatened today by two opposite dangers: on the one hand, violence by moral and religious fanatics and on the other hand, too-easy ...
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  3. Richard Routley (1984). I. On the Alleged Inconsistency, Moral Insensitivity and Fanaticism of Pacifism. Inquiry 27 (1-4):117 – 136.score: 12.0
    All the standard and some esoteric objections to pacifism are refuted, either directly or (as with the charge of impracticality) in outline. Familiar arguments to the inconsistency and irresponsibility of pacifism are shown to turn upon illegitimately construing pacifist activities such as resisting, preventing, and defending as involving violence. Several arguments against pacifism from violence as a lesser evil turn out to be fallacious; some involve the erroneous assumption that violence is the only evil, but some lead into what pacifism (...)
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  4. Mark Timmons (1984). Act Utilitarianism and the Moral Fanaticism Argument. Philosophical Studies 46 (2):215 - 226.score: 12.0
    One apparently devastating criticism of a whole range of act utilitarian (au) principles is marcus singer's claim that such principles are open to the charge of moral fanaticism, I.E., They commit one to the view that "no action is indifferent or trivial, Every occasion is momentous." this moral fanaticism argument (mfa) is examined in detail. I argue that the mfa is not all that devastating; indeed the act utilitarian can altogether escape the charge of being a fanatic.
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  5. Y. Jansen (2011). Postsecularism, Piety and Fanaticism: Reflections on Jurgen Habermas' and Saba Mahmood's Critiques of Secularism. Philosophy and Social Criticism 37 (9):977-998.score: 12.0
    This article analyses how recent critiques of secularism in political philosophy and cultural anthropology might productively be combined and contrasted with each other. I will show that Jürgen Habermas' postsecularism takes insufficient account of elementary criticisms of secularism on the part of anthropologists such as Talal Asad and Saba Mahmood. However, I shall also criticize Saba Mahmood’s reading of secularism by arguing that, in the end, she replaces the secular–religious divide with a secularity–piety divide; for example, in her reading of (...)
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  6. Lee F. Kerckhove (1994). Moral Fanaticism and the Holocaust. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 1 (1):21-25.score: 12.0
    I defend Kant’s moral psychology against John R. Silber’s argument that Kant cannot account for the radical evil of Hitler. Silber’s argument cannot be maintained, I argue, if Kant’s account of theological and moral fanaticism, and the personality of the moral fanatic, are taken into account. I contend that Kant’s writings support an analogy between the fanatical pursuit of religious and moral ideals and Hitler’s fanatical pursuit of an ideal of racial purity. I conclude that Kant’s account of moral (...)
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  7. Bernard Reginster (2003). What is a Free Spirit? Nietzsche on Fanaticism. Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 85 (1):51-85.score: 9.0
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  8. Keith Horton (2004). Famine and Fanaticism: A Response to Kekes. Philosophy 79 (2):319-327.score: 9.0
    In this paper, I critically discuss a number of arguments made by John Kekes, in a recent article, against the claim that those of us who are relatively affluent ought to do something for those living in absolute poverty in developing countries. There are, I argue, a variety of problems with Kekes' arguments, but one common thread stems from Kekes' failure to take account of the empirical research that has been conducted on the issues which he discusses.
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  9. Gustav Ichheiser (1969). On "Tolerance" and "Fanaticism": A Dilemma. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 29 (3):446-450.score: 9.0
  10. Arthur Schafer (1981). Moral Fanaticism: The Utilitarian's Nightmare? Journal of Social Philosophy 12 (1):3-10.score: 9.0
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  11. Edward W. James (1981). Butler, Fanaticism and Conscience. Philosophy 56 (218):517 - 532.score: 9.0
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  12. A. P. Martinich (2000). Religion, Fanaticism, and Liberalism. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 81 (4):409–425.score: 9.0
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  13. Beth Lord, Against the Fanaticism of Forces : Kant's Critique of Herder's Spinozism.score: 9.0
  14. Marcus G. Singer (1984). Consequences, Desirability, and the Moral Fanaticism Argument. Philosophical Studies 46 (2):227 - 237.score: 9.0
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  15. Jan Narveson (1978). Liberalism, Utilitarianism, and Fanaticism: R. M. Hare Defended. Ethics 88 (3):250-259.score: 9.0
  16. Hardy E. Jones (1977). Fanaticism and Moral Reasoning. Journal of Value Inquiry 11 (4):284-291.score: 9.0
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  17. Rodica Frentiu (2010). Yukio Mishima: Thymos Between Aesthetics and Ideological Fanaticism. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 9 (25):69-90.score: 9.0
    This study attempts to explore the possible motivations, both obvious and problematic, behind the ritual suicide (seppuku) committed by the Japanese writer in the name of the Emperor at the Eastern Headquarters of Japan’s Self-Defense Forces in 1970. History does not seem to be a coherent or intelligible process, as man’s struggle for nourishment is most often replaced by thymos, the desire for others to recognize his value or the value system of the ideals or noble purposes he is ready (...)
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  18. Robert K. Fullinwider (1977). Fanaticism and Hare's Moral Theory. Ethics 87 (2):165-173.score: 9.0
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  19. Alan Gettner (1977). Hare and Fanaticism. Ethics 87 (2):160-164.score: 9.0
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  20. Sieradzan Jacek (2009). Reasons why socrates wanted to die fanaticism, wisdom, euthanasia or suicide.(Powody, dla których sokrates chcial umrzec. Fanatyzm, madrosc, eutanazja badz samobyjstwo). [REVIEW] Archeus. Studia Z Bioetyki I Antropologii Filozoficznej 10:5-19.score: 9.0
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  21. W. Kretschmer (1989). Fanaticism and Mass Hysteria. Philosophy and History 22 (2):181-182.score: 9.0
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  22. Gordon D. Marino (1987). Is Madness Truth, Is Fanaticism Faith? International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 22 (1/2):41 - 53.score: 9.0
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  23. David L. Norton (1977). Can Fanaticism Be Distinguished From Moral Idealism? Review of Metaphysics 30 (3):497 - 507.score: 9.0
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  24. M. Bartko (1998). Marian Vaross or the Problem of Fanaticism. Filozofia 53 (2):127-130.score: 9.0
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  25. William T. Cavanaugh (2011). The Invention of Fanaticism. Modern Theology 27 (2):226-237.score: 9.0
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  26. Stuart Clark (2013). The Devil in Disguise: Deception, Delusion, and Fanaticism in the Early English Enlightenment. Common Knowledge 19 (1):134-134.score: 9.0
  27. Frederick J. Crosson (2003). Fanaticism, Politics, and Religion. Philosophy Today 47 (4):441-447.score: 9.0
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  28. Leonidas Donskis (2005). George Orwell: The Anatomy of Fanaticism and Hatred. In Jurate Baranova (ed.), Contemporary Philosophical Discourse in Lithuania. Council for Research in Values and Philosophy. 4--71.score: 9.0
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  29. Will Dudley (2013). The Active Fanaticism of Political and Religious Life. In Angelica Nuzzo (ed.), Hegel on Religion and Politics. State University of New York Press. 119.score: 9.0
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  30. Chamsy el-Ojeili (2012). Review: Fanaticism: On the Uses of an Idea. [REVIEW] Thesis Eleven 109 (1):115-117.score: 9.0
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  31. George S. Howard & Cody D. Christopherson (2009). Pluralism: An Antidote for Fanaticism, the Delusion of Our Age. Journal of Mind and Behavior 30 (3):139-147.score: 9.0
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  32. Jason Kemp Winfree (2012). Sacred Violence and the Death of God Bataille's Lucid Fanaticism. Philosophy Today 56 (2):211-220.score: 9.0
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  33. J. C. Laursen (1999). Dominique Colas: Civil Society and Fanaticism. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 7:536-538.score: 9.0
     
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  34. Kevin McDonnell (1974). Aquinas and Hare on Fanaticism. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 48:218-227.score: 9.0
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  35. John Passmore (1990). Enthusiasm and Fanaticism. Social Philosophy Today 3:1-12.score: 9.0
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  36. M. Vaross (1998). Gnoseological and Logical Aspects of Fanaticism. Filozofia 53 (2):120-126.score: 9.0
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  37. Paul Weithman (2011). Dominant Ends, Fanaticism, and Public Reasoning. Process Studies 40 (2):279-285.score: 9.0
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  38. Rachel Zuckert (2010). Kant's Account of Practical Fanaticism. In Benjamin Lipscomb & James Krueger (eds.), Kant's Moral Metaphysics: God, Freedom, and Immortality. De Gruyter. 291.score: 9.0
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  39. Scott Forschler (2007). How to Make Ethical Universalization Tests Work. Journal of Value Inquiry 41 (1):31-43.score: 6.0
    Richard Hare described the "ethical fanatic" as an agent who appeared to be able to rationally universalize morally horrendous values by "fanatically" accepting the consequences of those values even if their universalization harmed the original agent. This challenges the project of basing ethics on universalization tests, as advocated by Hare, Immanuel Kant, and others. Hare later argued that fanatics are irrational by appealing to a "principle of prudence," but this violates his meta-principle of not basing fundamental ethical principles upon intuitions (...)
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  40. Julia Borossa & Ivan Ward (eds.) (2009). Psychoanalysis, Fascism, and Fundamentalism. Edinburgh University Press.score: 6.0
  41. Ramin Jahanbegloo (2007). The Clash of Intolerances. Har-Anand Publications.score: 6.0
  42. Antonio Nunziante (2013). The “Morbid Fear of the Subjective”. Privateness and Objectivity in Mid-Twentieth Century American Naturalism. Metodo. International Studies in Phenomenology and Philosophy 1 (1-2):1-19.score: 3.0
    The “Morbid Fear of the Subjective” (copyright by Roy Wood Sellars) represents a key-element of the American naturalist debate of the Mid-twentieth century. On the one hand, we are witnessing to the unconditional trust in the objectivity of scientific discourse, while on the other (and as a consequence) there is the attempt to exorcise the myth of the “subjective” and of its metaphysical privateness. This theoretical roadmap quickly assumed the shape of an even sociological contrast between the “democraticity” of natural (...)
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  43. Infinite Ethics, Infinite Ethics.score: 3.0
    Aggregative consequentialism and several other popular moral theories are threatened with paralysis: when coupled with some plausible assumptions, they seem to imply that it is always ethically indifferent what you do. Modern cosmology teaches that the world might well contain an infinite number of happy and sad people and other candidate value-bearing locations. Aggregative ethics implies that such a world contains an infinite amount of positive value and an infinite amount of negative value. You can affect only a finite amount (...)
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  44. Ruth Weissbourd Grant (1997). Hypocrisy and Integrity: Machiavelli, Rousseau, and the Ethics of Politics. University of Chicago Press.score: 3.0
    Questioning the usual judgements of political ethics, Ruth W. Grant argues that hypocrisy can actually be constructive while strictly principled behavior can be destructive. Hypocrisy and Integrity offers a new conceptual framework that clarifies the differences between idealism and fanaticism while it uncovers the moral limits of compromise. "Exciting and provocative. . . . Grant's work is to be highly recommended, offering a fresh reading of Rousseau and Machiavelli as well as presenting a penetrating analysis of hypocrisy and integrity."--Ronald (...)
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  45. Corey W. Dyck (2004). Spirit Without Lines: Kant's Attempt to Reconcile the Genius with Society. Idealistic Studies 34 (2):151-62.score: 3.0
    In the Anthropology, Kant wonders whether the genius or the individual possessing perfected judgment has contributed more to the advance of culture. In the KU, Kant answers this question definitively on the side of those with perfected judgment. Nevertheless, occurring as it does in §50 of the KU, immediately after Kant’s celebration of the genius in §49, this only raises more questions. Kant rejects the genius in favour of the individual of taste as an advancer of culture, yet under what (...)
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  46. Nick Bostrom, The Infinitarian Challenge to Aggregative Ethics.score: 3.0
    Aggregative consequentialism and several other popular moral theories are threatened with paralysis: when coupled with some plausible assumptions, they seem to imply that it is always ethically indifferent what you do. Modern cosmology teaches that the world might well contain an infinite number of happy and sad people and other candidate value‐bearing locations. Aggregative ethics implies that such a world contains an infinite amount of positive value and an infinite amount of negative value. You can affect only a finite amount (...)
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  47. Ignacio L. Götz (2002). Faith, Humor, and Paradox. Praeger.score: 3.0
    Machine generated contents note: Introduction 1 --1. The Nature of Paradox 11 --2. Faith and Paradox 23 --3. Faith and Paradox: Cases 33 --4. Faith, Hope, and Unbelief 49 --5. Faith, Dogma, and Fanaticism 61 --6. The Structure of Humor 81 --7. On Frivolity 93 --8. Humor and Faith 103 --Conclusion 115.
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  48. Hubert L. Dreyfus (2011). All Things Shining: Reading the Western Classics to Find Meaning in a Secular Age. Free Press.score: 3.0
    Our contemporary nihilism -- Homer's polytheism -- From Aeschylus to Augustine : monotheism on the rise -- From Dante to Kant : the attractions and dangers of autonomy -- Fanaticism, polytheism, and Melville's "evil art" -- David Foster Wallace's nihilism -- Conclusion : lives worth living in a secular age.
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  49. Aaron Bunch (2010). The Kantian Sublime and the Revelation of Freedom (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 48 (4):532-533.score: 3.0
    This interesting and important contribution to scholarship on Kant’s account of sublime feeling develops an argument that the author first makes in an article, “Kant’s Consistency Regarding the Regime Change in France” (Philosophy and Social Criticism 32 [2006]: 443–60). The heart of the argument, presented in chapters 2 through 5, concludes that aesthetic enthusiasm (Enthusiasm, which Clewis distinguishes from Schwärmerei, or fanaticism) is a kind of sublime feeling, which can indirectly support morality and thus elicit an interest of reason (...)
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  50. Matthew Pianalto (2011). Moral Conviction. Journal of Applied Philosophy 28 (4):381-395.score: 3.0
    We often praise people who stand by their convictions in the face of adversity and practice what they preach. However, strong moral convictions can also motivate atrocious acts. Two significant questions here are (1) whether conviction itself — taken as a mode of belief — has any distinctive value, or whether all the value of conviction derives from its substantive content, and (2) how conviction can be made responsible in a way that mitigates the risks of falling into dogmatism, (...), and other vices. In response to the first question, I suggest that conviction has instrumental value that derives from its relationship to integrity and courage. On the second question, I articulate the roles that reflection, discourse (engagement with others), and humility must play in the dialectical process of maintaining responsible convictions. (shrink)
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