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  1. Kasper Raus, Farah Focquaert, Maartje Schermer, Jona Specker & Sigrid Sterckx (forthcoming). On Defining Moral Enhancement: A Clarificatory Taxonomy. Neuroethics:1-11.
    Recently there has been some discussion concerning a particular type of enhancement, namely ‘moral enhancement’. However, there is no consensus on what precisely constitutes moral enhancement, and as a result the concept is used and defined in a wide variety of ways. In this article, we develop a clarificatory taxonomy of these definitions and we identify the criteria that are used to delineate the concept. We think that the current definitions can be distinguished from each other by the criteria used (...)
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  2. Farah Focquaert (2014). Mandatory Neurotechnological Treatment: Ethical Issues. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 35 (1):59-72.
    What if neurofeedback or other types of neurotechnological treatment, by itself or in combination with behavioral treatment, could achieve a successful “rewiring” of the psychopath’s brain? Imagine that such treatments exist and that they provide a better long-term risk-minimizing strategy compared to imprisonment. Would it be ethical to offer such treatments as a condition of probation, parole, or (early) prison release? In this paper, I argue that it can be ethical to offer effective, non-invasive neurotechnological treatments to offenders as a (...)
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  3. Jona Specker, Farah Focquaert, Kasper Raus, Sigrid Sterckx & Maartje Schermer (2014). The Ethical Desirability of Moral Bioenhancement: A Review of Reasons. [REVIEW] BMC Medical Ethics 15 (1):67.
    The debate on the ethical aspects of moral bioenhancement focuses on the desirability of using biomedical as opposed to traditional means to achieve moral betterment. The aim of this paper is to systematically review the ethical reasons presented in the literature for and against moral bioenhancement.
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  4. Thomas Douglas, Pieter Bonte, Farah Focquaert, Katrien Devolder & Sigrid Sterckx (2013). Coercion, Incarceration, and Chemical Castration: An Argument From Autonomy. [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 10 (3):393-405.
    In several jurisdictions, sex offenders may be offered chemical castration as an alternative to further incarceration. In some, agreement to chemical castration may be made a formal condition of parole or release. In others, refusal to undergo chemical castration can increase the likelihood of further incarceration though no formal link is made between the two. Offering chemical castration as an alternative to further incarceration is often said to be partially coercive, thus rendering the offender’s consent invalid. The dominant response to (...)
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  5. Farah Focquaert (2013). Deep Brain Stimulation in Children: Parental Authority Versus Shared Decision-Making. Neuroethics 6 (3):447-455.
    This paper discusses the use of deep brain stimulation for the treatment of neurological and psychiatric disorders in children. At present, deep brain stimulation is used to treat movement disorders in children and a few cases of deep brain stimulation for psychiatric disorders in adolescents have been reported. Ethical guidelines on the use of deep brain stimulation in children are therefore urgently needed. This paper focuses on the decision-making process, and provides an ethical framework for (future) treatment decisions in pediatric (...)
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  6. Farah Focquaert, Andrea Glenn & Adrian Raine (2013). Free Will, Responsibility, and the Punishment of Criminals. In Thomas A. Nadelhoffer (ed.), The Future of Punishment. Oup Usa. 247.
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  7. Farah Focquaert & Johan Braeckman (2011). Mirroring the Mind: On Empathy and Autism. In Pieter R. Adriaens & Andreas de Block (eds.), Maladapting Minds: Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Evolutionary Theory. Oxford University Press. 241.
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  8. Farah Focquaert (2009). Bioethics and the Brain. Philosophical Psychology 22 (3):397-401.
  9. Farah Focquaert (2009). Het nut van waanzin. Essays over darwinisme en psychiatrie. Algemeen Nederlands Tijdschrift voor Wijsbegeerte 101 (4):278-279.
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  10. Farah Focquaert & Dirk De Ridder (2009). Direct Intervention in the Brain: Ethical Issues Concerning Personal Identity. Journal of Ethics in Mental Health 4 (2):1-7.
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  11. Farah Focquaert, Johan Braeckman & Steven M. Platek (2008). An Evolutionary Cognitive Neuroscience Perspective on Human Self-Awareness and Theory of Mind. Philosophical Psychology 21 (1):47 – 68.
    The evolutionary claim that the function of self-awareness lies, at least in part, in the benefits of theory of mind (TOM) regained attention in light of current findings in cognitive neuroscience, including mirror neuron research. Although certain non-human primates most likely possess mirror self-recognition skills, we claim that they lack the introspective abilities that are crucial for human-like TOM. Primate research on TOM skills such as emotional recognition, seeing versus knowing and ignorance versus knowing are discussed. Based upon current findings (...)
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