Search results for 'Fascism History' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. J. L. Yannielli (2012). The Nationalist International: Or What American History Can Teach Us About the Fascist Revolution. European Journal of Political Theory 11 (4):438-458.score: 96.0
    In challenging Marxist theorists to confront the radical rebirth at the core of the fascist revolution, Roger Griffin has carried fascist studies to a new and valuable plateau. Likewise, David D. Roberts’s elaboration of Griffin’s model offers a provocative and fruitful avenue to rethink fascist political culture. This article seeks to advance the dialogue to the next level by considering what an international approach can add to these primarily nationalist interpretations of generic fascism. Drawing on examples from the (...) of the United States, I argue that fascism is a fundamentally cosmopolitan process and that it needs to be placed on a broader continuum with the histories of slavery, racism and nationalism. (shrink)
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  2. Mark Antliff (2007). Avant-Garde Fascism: The Mobilization of Myth, Art, and Culture in France, 1909-1939. Duke University Press.score: 84.0
    Fascism, modernism and modernity -- The Jew as anti-artist : Georges Sorel and the aesthetics of the anti- Enlightenment -- La Cité française : Georges Valois, Le Corbusier and fascist theories of urbanism -- Machine primitives : Philippe Lamour and the fascist cult of youth -- Classical violence : Thierry Maulnier and the legacy of the Cercle Proudhon.
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  3. R. Saage (2012). Fascism – Revolutionary Departure to an Alternative Modernity? A Response to Roger Griffin's 'Exploding the Continuum of History'. European Journal of Political Theory 11 (4):426-437.score: 78.0
    If one looks at the controversial premises of analytical approaches to fascism according to Roger Griffin, it is not surprising that a yawning distance has opened up between Marxist and non-Marxist schools of interpretation. In this situation whereby two camps are mutually ignorant of one another, it is certainly suggestive that the liberal British theoretician of fascism should put himself forward to play the role of a ‘mediator’, even if he faces the danger of significant criticism from both (...)
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  4. David E. Ingersoll (2009). The Philosophic Roots of Modern Ideology: Liberalism, Conservatism, Marxism, Fascism, Nazism, Islamism. Sloan Pub..score: 78.0
  5. Bernd Warlich (1979). Salaried Employees Between Fascism and Democracy. The Political and Social History of Salaried Employees, USA 1890–1940, with International Comparisons. [REVIEW] Philosophy and History 12 (1):94-96.score: 78.0
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  6. Frances Flanagan (2008). Time, History, and Fascism in Bertolucci's Films. The European Legacy 4 (1):89-98.score: 72.0
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  7. R. J. B. Bosworth (1999). Fascism After the End of History: An Introduction. The European Legacy 4 (1):1-7.score: 72.0
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  8. R. Bosworth (2000). A History of Fascism 1914-1945. By Stanley G. Payne. The European Legacy 5 (3):443-443.score: 72.0
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  9. Michel De Dobbeleer (forthcoming). Exorcisme Voor Gevorderden: Vladimir Tismaneanu, The Devil in History: Communism, Fascism, and Some Lessons of the Twentieth Century. Nexus: Leestafel.score: 72.0
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  10. Gerd Koenen (1999). Causal Nexus? Toward a Real History of Anti-Fascism and Anti-Bolshevism. Telos 1999 (114):49-66.score: 72.0
    The question of whether there was a “causal nexus” between Bolshevism in the Soviet Union and National Socialism in Germany is far older than the Historikerstreit. Ernst Nolte's controversial thesis implied that the formation of the Nazis as a party (NSDAP) and a movement, and their subsequent rise to power were hardly conceivable without the German bourgeoisie's basic fear of Bolshevism; the Nazis' exterminatory anti-Semitism was only a sort of response to, and the interpretive reversal of, the looming expectation of (...)
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  11. Hervé A. Cavallera (2008). L'immagine Del Fascismo in Giovanni Gentile. Pensa Multimedia.score: 60.0
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  12. Herbert Marcuse (1998). Technology, War, and Fascism. Routledge.score: 54.0
    Acclaimed throughout the world as a philosopher of liberation and revolution, Herbert Marcuse is one of the most influential thinkers of the twentieth century. His penetrating critiques of the ways modern technology produces forms of society and culture with oppressive modes of social control indicate his enduring significance in the contemporary moment. This collection of unpublished or uncollected essays, unfinished manuscripts, and correspondence between 1942 and 1951, provides Marcuse's exemplary attempts to link theory with practice, and develops ideas that can (...)
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  13. Paolo Favero (2010). Italians, the “Good People”: Reflections on National Self-Representation in Contemporary Italian Debates on Xenophobia and War. Outlines. Critical Practice Studies 12 (2):138-153.score: 54.0
    Normal 0 0 1 91 520 .. 4 1 638 11.1280 0 14 0 0 Moving among historical material and contemporary debates on xenophobia and war, this paper is an exploration of the self-representation “ Italiani Brava Gente ”, an image claiming the intrinsic goodness of the Italian people. Originated during the first Italian colonial enterprises, it has been used also for overcoming the horrors of Fascism and is evoked in contemporary Italy too for justifying traumatic and violent events. (...)
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  14. Rik Peters (2010). Italian Legacies1. History and Theory 49 (1):115-129.score: 54.0
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  15. Erik Grimmer‐Solem (2012). National Identity in the Vanquished State: German and Japanese Postwar Historiography From a Transnational Perspective. History and Theory 51 (2):280-291.score: 54.0
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  16. Markus Daechsel (2006). Scientism and its Discontents: The Indo-Muslim “Fascism” of Inayatullah Khan Al-Mashriqi. Modern Intellectual History 3 (3):443-472.score: 48.0
    This essay offers a detailed reconstruction of the thought of Inayatullah Khan al-Mashriqi, a camp-follower of fascism in inter-war India who sought to reformulate Islam as a according to the precepts of Darwinian evolutionism. Mashriqi has so far been neglected because his political impact was only short-term and did not contribute to the larger story of decolonization in India and Pakistan. But far from being marginal, Mashriqi's philosophical ruminations actually provide a window for a much-needed re-evaluation of the meaning (...)
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  17. Wilhelm Büttemeyer (2009). Ernesto Grassi: Humanismus Zwischen Faschismus Und Nationalsozialismus. Alber.score: 48.0
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  18. Christopher Grau (2010). American History X, Cinematic Manipulation, and Moral Conversion. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 34 (1):52-76.score: 42.0
    American History X (hereafter AHX) has been accused by numerous critics of a morally dangerous cinematic seduction: using stylish cinematography, editing, and sound, the film manipulates the viewer through glamorizing an immoral and hate-filled neo-nazi protagonist. In addition, there’s the disturbing fact that the film seems to accomplish this manipulation through methods commonly grouped under the category of “fascist aesthetics.” More specifically, AHX promotes its neo-nazi hero through the use of several filmic techniques made famous by Nazi propagandist Leni (...)
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  19. Mark J. Sedgwick (2004). Against the Modern World: Traditionalism and the Secret Intellectual History of the Twentieth Century. Oxford University Press.score: 42.0
    Against the Modern World is the first history of Traditionalism, an important yet surprisingly little-known twentieth-century anti-modern movement. Comprising a number of often secret but sometimes very influential religious groups in the West and in the Islamic world, it affected mainstream and radical politics in Europe and the development of the field of religious studies in the United States, touching the lives of many individuals. French writer Rene Guenon rejected modernity as a dark age and sought to reconstruct the (...)
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  20. Peter Loptson (2007). Re-Examining the 'End of History' Idea and World History Since Hegel. The Proceedings of the Twenty-First World Congress of Philosophy 12:175-182.score: 42.0
    This paper offers an analysis of central features of modern world history which suggest a confirmation, and extension, of something resembling Fukuyama's Kojeve-Hegel *end of history' thesis. As is well known, Kojeve interpreted Hegel as having argued that in a meaningful sense history, as struggle and endeavour to achieve workable stasis in the mutual relations of selves and state-society collectivities, literally came to an end with Napoleon's 1806 victory at the battle of Jena. That victory led to (...)
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  21. L. Pellicani (2012). Fascism, Capitalism, Modernity. European Journal of Political Theory 11 (4):394-409.score: 42.0
    In this article I respond to the important questions raised by Roger Griffin and David D. Roberts by asserting the following points. First, that there is no justification to the position that the historical function of fascism was to establish the political hegemony of finance capital, as Marxist-Leninist scholars have maintained without providing a shred of evidence in support of their position. On the contrary, fascism was an epochal phenomenon which occured on several continents and had features which (...)
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  22. James Martin (2007). Piero Gobetti and the Rhetoric of Liberal Anti-Fascism. History of the Human Sciences 20 (4):107-127.score: 30.0
    This article examines the anti-fascist rhetoric of the self-proclaimed `revolutionary liberal', Piero Gobetti, in Italy in the early 1920s. Gobetti is interesting from a rhetorical perspective for two reasons: first, for his efforts to redefine liberalism as an emancipatory ethic of struggle that extended to the revolutionary worker's movement; and second, for his rejection of fascism as essentially continuous with the anti-conflictual tendencies of the liberal parliamentary regime. An exemplary `ideological innovator', Gobetti's `paradiastolic' redescription of liberalism and his metaphorical (...)
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  23. Charles Burdett (2003). Italian Fascism and Utopia. History of the Human Sciences 16 (1):93-108.score: 30.0
    Considering a number of recent works on the ideology and culture of Fascism, the article explores how the concept of utopia, as formulated by different thinkers, can prove useful in attempting to unlock some of the mechanisms through which Fascism sought to manipulate the imagination and the aspirations of Italians. It focuses on the written accounts of writers and journalists who reported on the supposed achievements of the regime both in Italy and in the newly established colonies. It (...)
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  24. Dan Stone (2011). The Uses and Abuses of 'Secular Religion': Jules Monnerot's Path From Communism to Fascism. History of European Ideas 37 (4):466-474.score: 30.0
    From starting his intellectual career as a surrealist, communist and co-founder of the Collège de Sociologie in 1937, Jules Monnerot (1911?95) ended it as a candidate for the Front National in 1989.In this article I offer an explanation for the unexpected trajectory of this thinker whose work is little known in the English-speaking world. Without overlooking the idea that the infamous College encouraged such tendencies, I argue that the notion of ?secular religion?, as Monnerot developed it in his Sociology of (...)
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  25. Walter L. Adamson (1980). Gramsci's Interpretation of Fascism. Journal of the History of Ideas 41 (4):615-633.score: 30.0
    Gramsci, An italian marxist intellectual politically active when fascism rose and later imprisoned by mussolini, Offers a sensitive and non-Stereotyped communist interpretation of fascism. He rejected the crude "fascism as last stage of capitalism thesis," the view that it was merely the "agent of the big bourgeoisie" and even the view that it reflected a particular set of class interests. He recognized that it was not merely reactionary, That it had complex internal divisions, That it exemplified the (...)
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  26. Juan Francisco Fuentes (2013). Totalitarian Language: Creating Symbols to Destroy Words. Contributions to the History of Concepts 8 (2):45-66.score: 30.0
    This article deals with totalitarianism and its language, conceived as both the denial and to some extent the reversal of liberalism and its conceptual framework. Overcoming liberal language meant not only setting up new political terminology, but also replacing words with symbols, ideas with sensations. This is why the standard political lexicon of totalitarianism became hardly more than a slang vocabulary for domestic consumption and, by contrast, under those regimes—mainly Italian fascism, Nazism, and Stalinism—a amboyant universe of images, sounds, (...)
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  27. Janek Wasserman (2012). The Austro-Marxist Struggle for “Intellectual Workers”: The Lost Debate on the Question of Intellectuals in Interwar Vienna. Modern Intellectual History 9 (2):361-388.score: 30.0
    This essay examines the efforts by Austro-Marxists to identify, define, and incorporate (geistige Arbeiter) into their movement. In this struggle, socialists faced a hegemonic conservative establishment that controlled the largest scholarly societies and intellectual publications and held most positions in the universities and educational bureaucracy. Despite notable successes in a closer examination of the discourse on intellectuals reveals that conservative ideas remained entrenched in interwar Austria. Austro-Marxists could not overcome the class biases and status anxieties of the educated middle class (...)
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  28. Marcel H. Bickel (2000). Ein biographischer Vergleich von Medizinhistorikern im Zeitraum 1825–1975. NTM International Journal of History and Ethics of Natural Sciences, Technology and Medicine 8 (1):129-148.score: 30.0
    25 medical historians born between 1800 and 1900 have been selected, mainly by citation frequency, for a study in comparative biography. They originated in Germany, U.S.A., U.K. France, Switzerland, Italy, and Austria. A number of them were active in two countries due to emigration from fascist Europe in the 1930s. All were MDs except for one historian. Most of them showed an interest in the history of medicine early in life, some only between age 40–50. Their motivations were quite (...)
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  29. Julia Borossa & Ivan Ward (eds.) (2009). Psychoanalysis, Fascism, and Fundamentalism. Edinburgh University Press.score: 30.0
  30. Alberto Spektorowski (1996). The Making of an Argentine Fascist. Leopoldo Lugones: From Revolutionary Left to Radical Nationalism. History of Political Thought 17 (1):79-108.score: 30.0
    This analysis seeks to contribute to the understanding of the development of fascism by studying the ideological left-to-right evolution of an intellectual from a peripheral country. I suggest that this intellectual evolution proves the universality of the ideological developments that preceded fascism, and sheds new light on the ideological interaction between fascism as a European political culture and local nationalist uprisings against liberal democracy and dependence on foreign financial power.
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  31. Howard Williams (1989). Nietzsche and Fascism. History of European Ideas 11 (1-6):893-899.score: 30.0
    There is an affinity between the politics that might be derived from Nietzsche's philosophy and the politics of fascism. Nietzsche favours elitism, he is not wholly averse to the use of cruelty as a means of achieving political ends, he is prepared to break decisively with the past and recommends an anti-Christian ethos. Those things in Nietzsche's philosophy which appear to denote the arbitrariness of civilisation might be picked on by a person of a fascist disposition. What they arguably (...)
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  32. Matthew Kieran (2010). Teaching & Learning Guide For: Art, Morality and Ethics: On the (Im)Moral Character of Art Works and Inter-Relations to Artistic Value. Philosophy Compass 5 (5):426-431.score: 24.0
    Up until fairly recently it was philosophical orthodoxy – at least within analytic aesthetics broadly construed – to hold that the appreciation and evaluation of works as art and moral considerations pertaining to them are conceptually distinct. However, following on from the idea that artistic value is broader than aesthetic value, the last 15 years has seen an explosion of interest in exploring possible inter-relations between the appreciative and ethical character of works as art. Consideration of these issues has a (...)
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  33. Claudio Fogu (2003). Actualism and the Fascist Historic Imaginary. History and Theory 42 (2):196–221.score: 24.0
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  34. Brian P. Copenhaver & Rebecca Copenhaver (2012). From Kant to Croce. University of Toronto Press.score: 24.0
    From around 1800, shortly before Pasquale Galluppi's first book, until 1950, just before Benedetto Croce died, the most formative influences on Italian philosophers were Kant and the post-Kantians, especially Hegel. In many ways, the Italian philosophers of this period lived in turbulent but creative times, from the Restoration to the Risorgimento and the rise and fall of Fascism. -/- From Kant to Croce is a comprehensive, highly readable history of the main currents and major figures of modern Italian (...)
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  35. R. G. Collingwood (1992/1984). The New Leviathan, or, Man, Society, Civilization, and Barbarism. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    The New Leviathan, originally published in 1942, a few months before the author's death, is the book which R. G. Collingwood chose to write in preference to completing his life's work on the philosophy of history. It was a reaction to the Second World War and the threat which Nazism and Fascism constituted to civilization. The book draws upon many years of work in moral and political philosophy and attempts to establish the multiple and complex connections between the (...)
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  36. Maurice A. Finocchiaro (1988). Gramsci and the History of Dialectical Thought. Cambridge University Press.score: 24.0
    This is an interpretative and evaluative study of the thought of Antonio Gramsci, the founding father of the Italian Communist Party who died in 1937 after ten years of imprisonment in Fascist jails. It proceeds by a rigorous textual analysis of his Prison Notebooks, the scattered notes he wrote during his incarceration. Professor Finocchiaro explores the nature of Gramsci's dialectical thinking, in order to show in what ways Gramsci was and was not a Marxist, as well as to illustrate correspondences (...)
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  37. Isaiah Berlin (1990/2003). The Crooked Timber of Humanity: Chapters in the History of Ideas. Pimlico.score: 24.0
    "Out of the crooked timber of humanity, no straight thing was ever made."--Immanuel Kant Isaiah Berlin was one of the most important philosophers of the twentieth century--an activist of the intellect who marshaled vast erudition and eloquence in defense of the endangered values of individual liberty and moral and political pluralism. In the Crooked Timber of Humanity he exposes the links between the ideas of the past and the social and political cataclysms of our present century: between the Platonic belief (...)
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  38. David Wood (2006). On the Way to Econstruction. Environmental Philosophy 3 (1):35-46.score: 24.0
    Environmentalism finds itself facing problems and aporiae which deconstruction helps us address. But equally, environmental concerns can embolden deconstruction to embrace a strategic materialism – the essential interruptibility of every idealization. Moreover, deconstruction’s critique of presence opens us to the strange temporalities of environmentalism: needing to act before we have proof, and for the benefit of future humans. The history of the earth is a singular sequence, ideographic – concrete, not rule governed, and not to be repeated. French ‘anti-humanism’ (...)
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  39. Rik Peters (2006). 6. Actes de Présence: Presence in Fascist Political Culture. History and Theory 45 (3):362–374.score: 24.0
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  40. Gregory Sullivan (2011). The Instinctual Nation-State: Non-Darwinian Theories, State Science and Ultra-Nationalism in Oka Asajirō's "Evolution and Human Life". [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 44 (3):547 - 586.score: 24.0
    In his anthology of socio-political essays, Evolution and Human Life, Oka Asajirō (1868-1944), early twentieth century Japan's foremost advocate of evolutionism, developed a biological vision of the nation-state as super-organism that reflected the concerns and aims of German-inspired Meiji statism and anticipated aspects of radical ultra-nationalism. Drawing on non-Darwinian doctrines, Oka attempted to realize such a fused or organic state by enhancing social instincts that would bind the minzoku (ethnic nation) and state into a single living entity. Though mobilization during (...)
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  41. Christopher S. Goto-Jones (2005). Political Philosophy in Japan: Nishida, the Kyoto School and Co-Prosperity. Routledge.score: 24.0
    Nishida Kitaro, originator of the Kyoto School and 'father of Japanese Philosophy' is usually viewed as an essentially apolitical thinker who underwent a 'turn' in the mid-1930s, becoming an ideologue of Japanese imperialism. Political Philosophy in Japan challenges the view that a neat distinction can be drawn between Nishida's apolitical 'pre-turn' writings and the apparently ideological tracts he produced during the war years. In the context of Japanese intellectual traditions, this book suggests that Nishida was a political thinker form the (...)
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  42. Sara Beardsworth (2005). Benjamin, Horkheimer, and Adorno. Idealistic Studies 35 (1):61-72.score: 24.0
    The paper considers what united and divided Benjamin and Horkheimer-Adorno in terms of their respective confrontations with the question of what it is to articulate the past historically. It presents their shared self-consciousness of the difficult task of responding critically to a problem conceived of as the entanglement of the concept of history with domination. For the problem imbues conceptualization itself and therefore threatens the value of the authoritative statements made in their own critical reflection on it. I show (...)
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  43. V. E. (1968). Fascism in its Epoch. The 'Action Française'. Italian Fascism. National Socialism. Philosophy and History 1 (1):105-106.score: 24.0
  44. Georg Stauth (1991). Critical Theory and Pre-Fascist Social Thought. Dept. Of Sociology, National University of Singapore, Republic of Singapore.score: 24.0
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  45. Hans Ulrich Thamer (1978). Fascism as a Social Movement. Germany and Italy Compared. Philosophy and History 11 (1):101-103.score: 24.0
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  46. Roger Eatwell (1996). The Birth of Fascist Ideology. History of European Ideas 22 (2):145-146.score: 24.0
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  47. Austin Harrington & David Roberts (2012). Introduction: Weimar Social Theory The 'Crisis of Classical Modernity' Revisited. Thesis Eleven 111 (1):3-8.score: 24.0
    The collapse of the Weimar Republic remains central to the history of the 20th century and to contemporary debates on 'classical modernity' and its Europe-wide crisis in the wake of the First World War. The present issue of Thesis Eleven focuses on three dimensions of the Weimar crisis: the experience of fundamental societal crisis and closure and its diagnostic power in relation to the rise of fascist movements; the cognitive and normative resources that sought to work against this crisis-ridden (...)
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  48. Alex Ostmann (1992). The Existentialist Dimension of Fascism. History of European Ideas 15 (1-3):233-238.score: 24.0
    The paper analyses the relationship between existentialist thought and right-wing ideologies focusing on the problem of existenzangst' as the result of economic, political, and social crisis. It concludes that existentialist thought is merely the intellectual dimension of a socio-political phenomenon but provides an element of respectability for political movements. Philosophical and political existentialism defend the individual's or the community's freedom of decision and their independence from social and economic forces which threaten them. Unrestricted by traditional codes of behaviour, people are (...)
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  49. Walter L. Adamson (1993). Avant-Garde Political Rhetorics: Prewar Culture in Florence as a Source of Postwar Fascism. History of European Ideas 16 (4-6):753-757.score: 24.0
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  50. Daniel Andrews, The Second Revolution.score: 24.0
    Liberties are taken in portraying the US public as class-conscious and informed. Otherwise, this story would not be about a revolution ... it would be about a fascist takeover. The chances of fighting off fascism are very slim unless the public at large is provided with an accessible alternative to the news and history which they are offered by the mass media, by the schools, by the government and by their employers. These reports are not a hoax, but (...)
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