Search results for 'Femininity' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Ulrika Björk (2010). Paradoxes of Femininity in the Philosophy of Simone de Beauvoir. Continental Philosophy Review 43 (1):39-60.score: 16.0
    This article explicates the meaning of the paradox from the perspective of sexual difference, as articulated by Simone de Beauvoir. I claim that the self, the other, and their becoming are sexed in Beauvoir’s early literary writing before the question of sexual difference is posed in The Second Sex (1949). In particular, Beauvoir’s description of Françoise’s subjective becoming in the novel She Came to Stay (1943) anticipates her later systematic description of ‘the woman in love’. In addition, I argue that (...)
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  2. Abraham Akkerman (2006). Femininity and Masculinity in City-Form: Philosophical Urbanism as a History of Consciousness. [REVIEW] Human Studies 29 (2):229 - 256.score: 16.0
    Mutual feedback between human-made environments and facets of thought throughout history has yielded two myths: the Garden and the Citadel. Both myths correspond to Jung’s feminine and masculine collective subconscious, as well as to Nietzsche’s premise of Apollonian and Dionysian impulses in art. Nietzsche’s premise suggests, furthermore, that the feminine myth of the Garden is time-bound whereas the masculine myth of the Citadel, or the Ideal City, constitutes a spatial deportment. Throughout history the two myths have continually molded the built (...)
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  3. Robert W. Mitchell & Alan L. Ellis (2013). Cat Person, Dog Person, Gay, or Heterosexual: The Effect of Labels on a Man's Perceived Masculinity, Femininity, and Likability. Society and Animals 21 (1):1-16.score: 15.0
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  4. Cecilia Sjöholm (2004). The Antigone Complex: Ethics and the Invention of Feminine Desire. Stanford University Press.score: 12.0
    What if psychoanalysis had chosen Antigone rather than Oedipus? This book traces the relation between ethics and desire in important philosophical texts that focus on femininity and use Antigone as their model. It shows that the notion of feminine desire is conditioned by a view of women as being prone to excesses and deficiencies in relation to ethical norms and rules. Sjöholm explains Mary Wollstonecraft’s work, as well as readings of Antigone by G.W.F. Hegel, Martin Heidegger, Luce Irigaray, Jacques (...)
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  5. Sandra Bartky (1993). Reply to Commentators on "Femininity and Domination". Hypatia 8 (1):192 - 196.score: 12.0
    Sandra Bartky's reply to the paper in the Symposium on her book Femininity and Domination.
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  6. Carol A. Mickett (1993). Comments on Sandra Lee Bartky's "Femininity and Domination". Hypatia 8 (1):173 - 177.score: 12.0
    To illustrate the strength of Bartky's clarity of insight I focus on her discussion of shame found in two essays in Femininity and Domination. I argue that these essays as well as the other in the collection identify and offer a clear analysis of many issues central to feminism and call for Bartky to write a sequel which offers constructive suggestions of ways out.
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  7. Patrocinio P. Schweickart (1993). In Defense of Femininity: Commentary on Sandra Bartky's "Femininity and Domination". Hypatia 8 (1):178 - 191.score: 12.0
    According to Bartky, "To be a feminist, one has first to become one," and to become a feminist, one has to overcome femininity. Although I agree with Bartky's critique of femininity, I argue that feminist consciousness has to involve a contradictory attitude toward femininity-not just a critique, but also an appreciation of the utopian values it harbors.
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  8. Willy Apollon (1993). Four Seasons in Femininity Orfour Men in a Woman's Life. Topoi 12 (2):101-115.score: 12.0
    The feminine complaint that Alex's passion echoes, raising it to a level rarely attained, is not limited to the pursuit of sexual jouissance . Nor can it be reduced to an aversion on the part of women to a morality of the signifier, as maintained by a certain reading of Freud. Very precisely, the persistent note in feminine restlessness is a certain relationship of the subject to the insufficiency of the signifier, which the quest for love registers. The fact that (...)
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  9. Wendy A. Burns-Ardolino (2003). Reading Woman: Displacing the Foundations of Femininity. Hypatia 18 (3):42-59.score: 12.0
    : I offer here an analysis of contemporary foundation garments while exploring the ways in which these garments encourage, reinforce and protect normative femininity. In examining the performatives of contemporary normative, ideal femininity as they perpetuate inhibited intentionality, ambiguous transcendence, and discontinuous unity, I look to the possibility for subversive performativity vis-à-vis the strengths of women in order to proliferate categories of gender and to potentially displace current notions of what it means to become woman.
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  10. Diana Damean (2010). Media and Gender: Constructing Feminine Identities in a Postmodern Culture. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 5 (14):89-94.score: 12.0
    In the postmodern era the impact media have on our lives is continuously growing. Not only do media reflect reality, but they also shape and reconstruct it according to the public's hopes, fears or fantasies. Reality itself is not the sum of all objective processes and things, but it is socially constructed by the discourses that reflect and produce power. On the other hand, the public does not simply accept or reject the media messages, but interprets them according to its (...)
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  11. Rosalind Gill & Christina Scharff (eds.) (2011). New Femininities: Postfeminism, Neoliberalism, and Subjectivity. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 12.0
    Machine generated contents note: -- Acknowledgements -- Preface; A.McRobbie -- Notes on Contributors -- Introduction; C.Scharff & R.Gill -- PART I: SEXUAL SUBJECTIVITY AND THE MAKEOVER PARADIGM -- Pregnant Beauty: Maternal Femininities under Neoliberalism; I.Tyler -- The Right to Be Beautiful: Postfeminist Identity and Consumer Beauty Advertising; M.M.Lazar -- Spicing It Up: Sexual Entrepreneurs and The Sex Inspectors; L.Harvey & R.Gill -- '(M)Other-in-Chief: Michelle Obama and the Ideal of Republican Womanhood'; L.Guerrero -- Scourging the Abject Body: Ten Years Younger and (...)
     
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  12. Sandra Bartky Lee (2012). Femininity and Domination: Studies in the Phenomenology of Oppression. Routledge.score: 12.0
    Bartky draws on the experience of daily life to unmask the many disguises by which intimations of inferiority are visited upon women. She critiques both the male bias of current theory and the debilitating dominion held by notions of "proper femininity" over women and their bodies in patriarchal culture.
     
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  13. Teresa Brennan (1992). The Interpretation of the Flesh: Freud and Femininity. Routledge.score: 12.0
    The `riddle of femininity', like Freud's reference to women's sexuality as a `dark continent', has been treated as a romantic aside or a sexist evasion, rather than a problem to be solved. In this first comprehensive study, Teresa Brennan suggests that by placing these theories in the context of Freud's work overall, we will begin to understand why femininity was such a riddle for Freud.
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  14. Tina Chanter (2001). Time, Death, and the Feminine: Levinas with Heidegger. Stanford University Press.score: 10.0
    Examining Levinas's critique of the Heideggerian conception of temporality, this book shows how the notion of the feminine both enables and prohibits the most fertile territory of Levinas's thought. The author suggests that though Levinas's conception of subjectivity corrects some of the problems Heidegger's philosophy introduces, such as his failure to deal adequately with ethics, Levinas creates new stumbling blocks, notably the confining role he accords to the feminine. For Levinas, the feminine functions as that which facilitates but is excluded (...)
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  15. Alina Isac & Mihai Albu (2010). Dimensiunea femininã a miscãrii ecumenice/ The Feminine Dimension of the Ecumenism. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 2 (6):132-148.score: 10.0
    This introductory paper analyzes the Orthodox, Catholic, and Protestant sects, which form the core of the Ecumenical movement. The development of the feminine problem in the ecumenical movement took shape in 1948, at the first Conference of the E.C.C., when Sarah Chakko presented a report on the place and role of women in church. Among the most important women’s achievements we must mention: The International Day of Prayer, the creation of the Department on Cooperation of Men and Women in Church (...)
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  16. Blanka Knotková-Čapková (2012). Similarities and Differences in Postcolonial Bengali Women’s Writings: The Case of Mahasweta Debi and Mallika Sengupta. ARGUMENT 2 (1):97-115.score: 9.0
    The emancipation of women has become a strong critical discourse in Bengali literature since the 19th century. Only since the second half of the 20th century, however, have female writers markedly stepped out of the shadow of their male colleagues, and the writings on women become more and more often articulated by women themselves. In this article, I focus on particular concepts of femininity in selected texts of two outstanding writers of different generations, a prose writer, and a woman (...)
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  17. Rosalind Minsky (1996). Psychoanalysis and Gender: An Introductory Reader. Routledge.score: 9.0
    What is object-relations theory and what does it have to do with literary studies? How can Freud's phallocentric theories be applied by feminist critics? In Psychoanalysis and Gender: An Introductory Reader Rosalind Minsky answers these questions and more, offering students a clear, straightforward overview without ever losing them in jargon. In the first section Minsky outlines the fundamentals of the theory, introducing the key thinkers and providing clear commentary. In the second section, the theory is demonstratedn by an anthology of (...)
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  18. Abraham Akkerman (2012). Gender Myth and the Mind-City Composite: From Plato’s Atlantis to Walter Benjamin’s Philosophical Urbanism. GeoJournal (in Press; Online Version Published) 78.score: 9.0
    In the early twentieth century Walter Benjamin introduced the idea of epochal and ongoing progression in interaction between mind and the built environment. Since early antiquity, the present study suggests, Benjamin’s notion has been manifest in metaphors of gender in city-form, whereby edifices and urban voids have represented masculinity and femininity, respectively. At the onset of interaction between mind and the built environment are prehistoric myths related to the human body and to the sky. During antiquity gender projection can (...)
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  19. Sandra Lee Bartky (1982). Narcissism, Femininity and Alienation. Social Theory and Practice 8 (2):127-143.score: 9.0
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  20. Kathy Davis (ed.) (1997). Embodied Practices: Feminist Perspectives on the Body. Sage.score: 9.0
    This book focuses on the significance of the body in contemporary feminist scholarship. Whether the body is treated as biological bedrock or subversive metaphor, it is implicated in the cultural and historical construction of sexual difference as well as asymmetrical power relations. The contributors to this volume examine the role of the body as socially shaped and historically colonized territory and as the focus of individual womenÆs struggles for autonomy and self-determination. They also analyze its centrality to the feminist critique (...)
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  21. Li-Hsiang Lisa Rosenlee (2011). Femininity and Feminism: Chinese and Contemporary [A Special Issue of the Journal of Chinese Philosophy]. Edited by LINYU GU. Volume 36, Number 2, June 2009. [REVIEW] Hypatia 27 (2):449-455.score: 9.0
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  22. E. A. Hemelrijk (2004). Masculinity and Femininity in the Laudatio Turiae. Classical Quarterly 54 (1):185-197.score: 9.0
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  23. Nikky-Guninder Kaur Singh (1993). The Feminine Principle in the Sikh Vision of the Transcendent. Cambridge University Press.score: 9.0
    A critical interpretation of Sikh literature from a feminist perspective.
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  24. Linda Lemoncheck (2002). Book Review: Jennifer Harding. Sex Acts: Practices of Femininity and Masculinity. London/Thousand Oaks, Calif.: Sage Publications, 1998. [REVIEW] Hypatia 17 (3):286-289.score: 9.0
  25. Rhoda Hadassah Kotzin (1993). Bribery and Intimidation: A Discussion of Sandra Lee Bartky's "Femininity and Domination: Studies in the Phenomenology of Oppression". Hypatia 8 (1):164 - 172.score: 9.0
    A review of my undergraduate students' commentaries on two of Bartky's essays serves as the occasion for elaborating on Bartky's analyses of factors that sustain and perpetuate the subjection and disempowerment of women. In my elaboration I draw from John Stuart Mill's statement: "In the case of women, each individual of the subject-class is in a chronic state of bribery and intimidation combined." I conclude by raising the question, How is personal transformation possible?
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  26. Lucie Cantin (1993). Femininity: From Passion to an Ethics of the Impossible. Topoi 12 (2):127-136.score: 9.0
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  27. Daniel Tércio (2012). Performing Femininity: Dance and Literature in German Modernism. By Alexandra Kolb. The European Legacy 17 (4):564 - 566.score: 9.0
    The European Legacy, Volume 17, Issue 4, Page 564-566, July 2012.
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  28. Judith Andre (1984). Femininity," "Masculinity," and "Androgyny. Teaching Philosophy 7 (2):156-157.score: 9.0
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  29. Sally J. Scholz (1993). Femininity and Domination. Radical Philosophy Review of Books 7 (7):5-8.score: 9.0
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  30. Bernice L. Hausman (1999). Ovaries to Estrogen: Sex Hormones and Chemical Femininity in the 20th Century. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 20 (3):165-176.score: 9.0
  31. Peter J. Burgard (ed.) (1994). Nietzsche and the Feminine. University Press of Virginia.score: 9.0
    Now, in an innovative and wide-ranging volume, Peter Burgard has brought together new studies by outstanding scholars in philosophy, feminism, comparative ...
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  32. Patricia Adair Gowaty (1992). Evolutionary Biology and Feminism. Human Nature 3 (3):217-249.score: 9.0
    Evolutionary biology and feminism share a variety of philosophical and practical concerns. I have tried to describe how a perspective from both evolutionary biology and feminism can accelerate the achievement of goals for both feminists and evolutionary biologists. In an early section of this paper I discuss the importance of variation to the disciplines of evolutionary biology and feminism. In the section entitled “Control of Female Reproduction” I demonstrate how insight provided by participation in life as woman and also as (...)
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  33. Jane M. Ussher (2003). The Role of Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder in the Subjectification of Women. Journal of Medical Humanities 24 (1-2):131-146.score: 9.0
    This paper will examine the way in which premenstrual symptomatology has been represented and regulated by psychology and psychiatry. It questions the “truths” about women's premenstrual experiences that circulate in scientific discourse, namely the fictions framed as facts that serve to regulate femininity, reproduction, and what it is to be “woman.” Hegemonic truths that define Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder (PMDD) and its nosological predecessor Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS) are examined to illustrate how regimes of objectified knowledge and practices of “assemblage” come (...)
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  34. Nicole Koehler & James S. Chisholm (2009). Does Early Psychosocial Stress Affect Mate Choice? Human Nature 20 (1):52-66.score: 9.0
    Early psychosocial stress (e.g., parental divorce, abuse) is conjectured to place individuals on a developmental trajectory leading to earlier initiation of sexual activity, earlier reproduction, and having more sex partners than those with less early psychosocial stress. But does it also affect an individual’s mate choice? The present study examined whether early psychosocial stress affects preferences and dislikes for opposite-sex faces varying in masculinity/femininity, a putative indicator of mate quality, in premenopausal women (58 with a natural cycle, 53 pill-users) (...)
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  35. Danielle Bergeron (1993). Femininity and Maternity. Topoi 12 (2):117-125.score: 9.0
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  36. Patrick Paul Garlinger (1999). "Homo-Ness" and the Fear of Femininity. Diacritics 29 (1):57-71.score: 9.0
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  37. Linda Kintz (forthcoming). Permeable Boundaries, Femininity, and Violence. Semiotics:404-411.score: 9.0
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  38. Linda LeMoncheck (2002). Sex Acts: Practices of Femininity and Masculinity (Review). Hypatia 17 (3):286-289.score: 9.0
  39. Vek Lewis (2009). Whipping Girl: A Transsexual Woman on Sexism and the Scapegoating of Femininity. By Julia Serano. Hypatia 24 (3):200-205.score: 9.0
  40. Thomas W. Sheehan (forthcoming). Femininity's Fugue. Semiotics:38-42.score: 9.0
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  41. Orit Yafeh (2007). The Time in the Body: Cultural Construction of Femininity in Ultraorthodox Kindergartens for Girls. Ethos 35 (4):516-553.score: 9.0
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  42. Michael Atkinson (2008). Exploring Male Femininity in Thecrisis': Men and Cosmetic Surgery. Body and Society 14 (1):67-87.score: 9.0
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  43. Sandra Lee Bartky (1998). Skin Deep: Femininity as a Disciplinary Regime. In Bat-Ami Bar On & Ann Ferguson (eds.), Daring to Be Good: Essays in Feminist Ethico-Politics. Routledge.score: 9.0
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  44. Danielle Bergeron (2008). Femininity. American Journal of Semiotics 8 (4):5-15.score: 9.0
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  45. Craig Brandist, James G. Buickerood, James E. Crimmins, Jonathan Elukin, Matt Erlin, Matthew R. Goodrum, Paul Guyer, Leor Halevi, Neil Hargraves & Peter Harrison (2002). Andrews, Naomi J.:“La Mère Humanité”: Femininity in the Romantic Socialism of Pierre Leroux and the Abbé A.-L. Constant........... Boyle, Marjorie O'Rourke: Pure of Heart: From Ancient Rites to Renaissance Plato..................................... [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Ideas 63:745-746.score: 9.0
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  46. Lucie Cantin (2008). The Letter and the “Thing” in Femininity. American Journal of Semiotics 7 (3):35 - 41.score: 9.0
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  47. Mihaela Frunza (2010). Feminitate si ocultism/ Femininity and Occultism. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 2 (5):127-142.score: 9.0
    This paper attempts to critically discuss and situate the phenomena of contemporary witchcraft (both the Wicca tradition and the feminist one). Contemporary Anglo-Saxon witchcraft is one of the compo- nents of “mystic-esoteric nebulousness”. It has a particular status both among contemporary prac- tices of witchcraft and among women-dominated religions. Among recent philosophical trends, it has affinities with ecofeminism and neopaganism. Along this line, its roots seem to indicate a connec- tion with the ancient beliefs that characterized the matriarchal civilization of (...)
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  48. Minae Inahara (2009). This Body Which is Not One: The Body, Femininity and Disability. Body and Society 15 (1):47-62.score: 9.0
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  49. Roger Just, M. R. Lefkowitz, M. B. Fant & S. Lipshitz (1980). Arethusa 11, 1/2. Women in the Ancient WorldWomen in Greece and RomeTearing the Veil: Essays on Femininity. Journal of Hellenic Studies 100:245.score: 9.0
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