Search results for 'Femininity (Philosophy' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  69
    Ulrika Björk (2010). Paradoxes of Femininity in the Philosophy of Simone de Beauvoir. Continental Philosophy Review 43 (1):39-60.
    This article explicates the meaning of the paradox from the perspective of sexual difference, as articulated by Simone de Beauvoir. I claim that the self, the other, and their becoming are sexed in Beauvoir’s early literary writing before the question of sexual difference is posed in The Second Sex (1949). In particular, Beauvoir’s description of Françoise’s subjective becoming in the novel She Came to Stay (1943) anticipates her later systematic description of ‘the woman in love’. In addition, I argue (...)
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  2.  21
    Li-Hsiang Lisa Rosenlee (2012). Femininity and Feminism: Chinese and Contemporary [A Special Issue of the Journal of Chinese Philosophy ]. Edited by LINYU GU. Volume 36, Number 2, June 2009. [REVIEW] Hypatia 27 (2):449-455.
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  3. Marjorie Weinzweig (1983). Philosophy, Femininity and Feminism. Philosophical Books 24 (3):129-136.
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  4. Judith A. Little (ed.) (2007). Feminist Philosophy and Science Fiction: Utopias and Dystopias. Prometheus Books.
     
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  5.  24
    Tina Chanter (2001). Time, Death, and the Feminine: Levinas with Heidegger. Stanford University Press.
    Examining Levinas's critique of the Heideggerian conception of temporality, this book shows how the notion of the feminine both enables and prohibits the most fertile territory of Levinas's thought. The author suggests that though Levinas's conception of subjectivity corrects some of the problems Heidegger's philosophy introduces, such as his failure to deal adequately with ethics, Levinas creates new stumbling blocks, notably the confining role he accords to the feminine. For Levinas, the feminine functions as that which facilitates but is excluded (...)
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  6.  84
    Judith Butler (1993/2011). Bodies That Matter: On the Discursive Limits of "Sex". Routledge.
    In ____Bodies That Matter,__ Judith Butler further develops her distinctive theory of gender by examining the workings of power at the most "material" dimensions of sex and sexuality. Deepening the inquiries she began in _Gender_ _Trouble,_ Butler offers an original reformulation of the materiality of bodies, examining how the power of heterosexual hegemony forms the "matter" of bodies, sex, and gender. Butler argues that power operates to constrain "sex" from the start, delimiting what counts as a viable sex. She offers (...)
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  7.  67
    Cecilia Sjöholm (2004). The Antigone Complex: Ethics and the Invention of Feminine Desire. Stanford University Press.
    What if psychoanalysis had chosen Antigone rather than Oedipus? This book traces the relation between ethics and desire in important philosophical texts that focus on femininity and use Antigone as their model. It shows that the notion of feminine desire is conditioned by a view of women as being prone to excesses and deficiencies in relation to ethical norms and rules. Sjöholm explains Mary Wollstonecraft’s work, as well as readings of Antigone by G.W.F. Hegel, Martin Heidegger, Luce Irigaray, Jacques (...)
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  8.  44
    Kathy Davis (ed.) (1997). Embodied Practices: Feminist Perspectives on the Body. Sage.
    This book focuses on the significance of the body in contemporary feminist scholarship. Whether the body is treated as biological bedrock or subversive metaphor, it is implicated in the cultural and historical construction of sexual difference as well as asymmetrical power relations. The contributors to this volume examine the role of the body as socially shaped and historically colonized territory and as the focus of individual womenÆs struggles for autonomy and self-determination. They also analyze its centrality to the feminist critique (...)
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  9.  9
    Peter J. Burgard (ed.) (1994). Nietzsche and the Feminine. University Press of Virginia.
    Now, in an innovative and wide-ranging volume, Peter Burgard has brought together new studies by outstanding scholars in philosophy, feminism, comparative ...
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  10.  64
    Luce Irigaray (1996). I Love to You: Sketch for a Felicity Within History. Routledge.
    In I Love to You , Luce Irigaray moves from the critique of patriarchy to an exploration of the ground for a possible inter-subjectivity between the two sexes. Continuing her rejection of demands for equality, Irigaray poses the question: how can we move to a new era of sexual difference in which women and men establish lasting relations with one another without reducing the other to the status of object? Drawing upon Hegel, Irigaray proposes a dialectic appropriate to each sex (...)
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  11. Carol Bigwood (1993). Earth Muse: Feminism, Nature, and Art. Temple University Press.
  12. Naomi Schor (1987/2007). Reading in Detail: Aesthetics and the Feminine. Routledge.
    Who cares about details? As Naomi Schor explains in her highly influential book, we do-but it has not always been so. The interest in detail--in art, in literature, and as an aesthetic category--is the product of the decline of classicism and the rise of realism. But the story of the detail is as political as it is aesthetic. Secularization, the disciplining of society, the rise of consumerism, the invention of the quotidian, have all brought detail to the fore. In this (...)
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  13.  7
    Prudence Allen (1997). The Concept of Woman. W.B. Eerdmans Pub..
    v. 1. The Aristotelian revolution, 750 BC-AD 1250 -- v. 2. The early humanist Reformation, 1250-1500.
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  14. Rashida A. Khanum (2012). Contemporary Gender Issues. Distributor in India, Paragon Enterprise.
  15.  12
    Nikky-Guninder Kaur Singh (1993). The Feminine Principle in the Sikh Vision of the Transcendent. Cambridge University Press.
    A critical interpretation of Sikh literature from a feminist perspective.
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  16. Arend Vitus Nicolaas van Woerden (2004). Vrouwelijk En Mannelijk Bij Erasmus: Een Onderzoek Inzake Genus. Erasmus Publishing.
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  17.  4
    Gina Schouten (2016). Philosophy in Schools: Can Early Exposure Help Solve Philosophy's Gender Problem? Hypatia 31 (2):275-292.
    In this article, I explore a new reason in favor of precollegiate philosophy: It could help narrow the persistent gender disparity within the discipline. I catalog some of the most widely endorsed explanations for the underrepresentation of women in philosophy and argue that, on each hypothesized explanation, precollegiate philosophy instruction could help improve our discipline's gender balance. Explanations I consider include stereotype threat, gendered philosophical intuitions, inhospitable disciplinary environment, lack of same-sex role models for women students in philosophy, and conflicting (...)
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  18. Bat-Ami Bar On (ed.) (1993). Modern Engendering: Critical Feminist Readings in Modern Western Philosophy. State University of New York Press.
    This book contains readings of canonical Western philosophical texts from the viewpoint of current feminist thinking. The contributors focus specifically on the ways in which modern Western philosophy constructs genders and analyzes gender relations. They provide a detailed analysis of modern philosophers’ conceptions of masculinity and femininity and call attention to the intertwining of gender with conceptual schema and networks.
     
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  19. Trista Selous (ed.) (2007). Hipparchia's Choice: An Essay Concerning Women, Philosophy, Etc. Cup.
    "To be a philosopher and to be a feminist are one and the same thing. A feminist is a woman who does not allow anyone to think in her place."-from _Hipparchia's Choice_ A work of rare insight and irreverence, _Hipparchia's Choice_ boldly recasts the history of philosophy from the pre-Socratics to the post-Derrideans as one of masculine texts and male problems. The position of women, therefore, is less the result of a hypothetical "femininity" and more the fault of exclusion (...)
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  20.  1
    Sandra A. Wawrytko (1983). The Undercurrent of Feminine Philosophy in Eastern and Western Thought. Philosophy East and West 33 (2):199-201.
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  21.  14
    Carol P. Christ (2003). She Who Changes: Re-Imagining the Divine in the World. Palgrave Macmillan.
    It was only recently that people began to refer to God, occasionally, as “she.” Is it now possible to re-imagine divine power as a female force deeply related to the changing world? If so, then we can understand the deeper meaning of female images of divine power including depictions such as “The Goddess.” Carol Christ offers a new look at these female images of God in She Who Changes . She shows how many traditional ideas about divine power reject the (...)
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  22. Alison Stone (2004). Essentialism and Anti-Essentialism in Feminist Philosophy. Journal of Moral Philosophy 1 (2):135-153.
    This article revisits the ethical and political questions raised by feminist debates over essentialism, the belief that there are properties essential to women and which all women share. Feminists’ widespread rejection of essentialism has threatened to undermine feminist politics. Re-evaluating two responses to this problem—‘strategic’ essentialism and Iris Marion Young’s idea that women are an internally diverse ‘series’—I argue that both unsatisfactorily retain essentialism as a descriptive claim about the social reality of women’s lives. I argue instead that women have (...)
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  23.  19
    Mimi Schippers (2007). Recovering the Feminine Other: Masculinity, Femininity, and Gender Hegemony. [REVIEW] Theory and Society 36 (1):85-102.
  24. Mary Vetterling-Braggin (ed.) (1982). "Femininity," "Masculinity," and "Androgyny": A Modern Philosophical Discussion. Littlefield, Adams.
  25.  1
    Joanne Pearman (2011). Lizzie Seal: Women, Murder and Femininity: Gender Representations of Women Who Kill. [REVIEW] Feminist Legal Studies 19 (2):193-195.
  26. Christine James (1997). Feminism and Masculinity: Reconceptualizing the Dichotomy of Reason and Emotion. International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy 17 (1/2):129-152.
    In the context of feminist and postmodern thought, traditional conceptions of masculinity and what it means to be a “Real Man” have been critiqued. In Genevieve Lloyd's The Man of Reason, this critique takes the form of exposing the effect that the distinctive masculinity of the “man of reason” has had on the history of philosophy. One major feature of the masculine-feminine dichotomy will emerge as a key notion for understanding the rest of the paper: the dichotomy of reason-feeling, a (...)
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  27.  1
    Robin May Schott (ed.) (2010). Birth, Death, and Femininity: Philosophies of Embodiment. Indiana University Press.
    Issues surrounding birth and death have been fundamental for Western philosophy as well as for individual existence. The contributors to this volume unravel the gendered aspects of the classical philosophical discourses on death, bringing in discussions about birth, creativity, and the entire chain of human activity. By linking their work to major thinkers such as Heidegger, Nietzsche, Beauvoir, and Arendt, and to major philosophical currents such as ancient philosophy, existentialism, phenomenology, and social and political philosophy, they challenge prevailing feminist articulations (...)
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  28. Caroline Joan S. Picart (1999). Resentment and the "Feminine" in Nietzsche's Politico-Aesthetics. Penn State University Press.
    Nietzsche's remarks about women and femininity have generated a great deal of debate among philosophers, some seeing them as ineradicably misogynist, others interpreting them more favorably as ironic and potentially useful for modern feminism. In this study, Kay Picart uses a genealogical approach to track the way Nietzsche's initial use of "feminine" mythological figures as symbols for modernity's regenerative powers gradually gives way to an increasingly misogynistic politics, resulting in the silencing and emasculation of his earlier configurations of the (...)
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  29.  12
    Sally J. Scholz (1993). Femininity and Domination. Radical Philosophy Review of Books 7 (7):5-8.
  30.  14
    Judith Andre (1984). Femininity," "Masculinity," and "Androgyny. Teaching Philosophy 7 (2):156-157.
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  31. Penelope Deutscher (2002). 'Is It Not Remarkable That Nietzsche . . . Should Have Hated Rousseau?' Woman, Femininity: Distancing Nietzsche From Rousseau. [REVIEW] In Genevieve Lloyd (ed.), Feminism and History of Philosophy. OUP Oxford
  32. Allison Kavey (2007). Books of Secrets: Natural Philosophy in England, 1550-1600. University of Illinois Press.
    _How cultural categories shaped--and were shaped by--new ideas about controlling nature_ Ranging from alchemy to necromancy, "books of secrets" offered medieval readers an affordable and accessible collection of knowledge about the natural world. Allison Kavey's study traces the cultural relevance of these books and also charts their influence on the people who read them. Citing the importance of printers in choosing the books' contents, she points out how these books legitimized manipulating nature, thereby expanding cultural categories, such as masculinity, (...), gentleman, lady, and midwife, to include the willful command of the natural world. (shrink)
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  33. Linda Lemoncheck (2002). Book Review: Jennifer Harding. Sex Acts: Practices of Femininity and Masculinity. London/Thousand Oaks, Calif.: Sage Publications, 1998. [REVIEW] Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy 17 (3):286-289.
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  34. Elissa Marder (2014). Pandora's Fireworks; or, Questions Concerning Femininity, Technology, and the Limits of the Human. Philosophy and Rhetoric 47 (4):386-399.
    In Hesiod’s legendary account of how humans came to be, two extrahuman characters, Prometheus and Pandora, play decisive roles. Both figures intercede and intervene in man’s world and indeed inaugurate the series of events that culminates in the becoming human of man.1 Although neither Prometheus nor Pandora is human, they both participate actively in human life, and through their respective actions the race of men becomes not only alienated from the realm of gods and animals but also from its own (...)
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  35. Martina Meyer (2010). Reclaiming Femininity: Antigone's 'Choice'in Art and Art History. In S. E. Wilmer & Audrone Zukauskaite (eds.), Interrogating Antigone in Postmodern Philosophy and Criticism. OUP Oxford 254.
     
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  36. Robin May Schott (ed.) (2010). Birth, Death, and Femininity: Philosophies of Embodiment. Indiana University Press.
    Issues surrounding birth and death have been fundamental for Western philosophy as well as for individual existence. The contributors to this volume unravel the gendered aspects of the classical philosophical discourses on death, bringing in discussions about birth, creativity, and the entire chain of human activity. By linking their work to major thinkers such as Heidegger, Nietzsche, Beauvoir, and Arendt, and to major philosophical currents such as ancient philosophy, existentialism, phenomenology, and social and political philosophy, they challenge prevailing feminist articulations (...)
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  37. A. Soble (1987). J. Van Herik, "Freud on Femininity and Faith". International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 22 (1/2):99.
     
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  38.  7
    Pam R. Sailors (2013). Gender Roles Roll. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 7 (2):245-258.
    Roller derby, once known for scripted theatricality that made it more like a stage play than a sport, has reinvented itself as a legitimate athletic endeavour. Since its rebirth as the Women's Flat Track Derby Association in the early 2000s, it has experienced exponential growth, from 30 flat track derby leagues in 2005 to more than 450 leagues in 2010. This translates to more than 15,000 skaters worldwide. Roller derby provides a unique case of a women's sport that is not (...)
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  39. Eva Gothlin (1999). Simone de Beauvoir's Notions of Appeal, Desire, and Ambiguity and Their Relationship to Jean-Paul Sartre's Notions of Appeal and Desire. Hypatia 14 (4):83 - 95.
    This essay focuses on some important concepts in Beauvoir's philosophy: ambiguity, desire, and appeal (appel). Ambiguity and appeal, concepts originating in Beauvoir's moral philosophy, are in The Second Sex connected to the female body and feminine desire. This indicates the complexity of Beauvoir's image of femininity. This essay also proposes a comparative reading of Beauvoir's and Sartre's concepts of appeal, a reading that indicates differences in their views of the relationship among ethics, desire, and gender.
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  40. Amy Allen (2005). Dependency, Subordination, and Recognition: On Judith Butler's Theory of Subjection. [REVIEW] Continental Philosophy Review 38 (3-4):199-222.
    Judith Butler's recent work expands the Foucaultian notion of subjection to encompass an analysis of the ways in which subordinated individuals becomes passionately attached to, and thus come to be psychically invested in, their own subordination. I argue that Butler's psychoanalytically grounded account of subjection offers a compelling diagnosis of how and why an attachment to oppressive norms – of femininity, for example – can persist in the face of rational critique of those norms. However, I also argue (...)
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  41.  24
    Michael O'Rourke (2011). The Afterlives of Queer Theory. Continent 1 (2):102-116.
    continent. 1.2 (2011): 102-116. All experience open to the future is prepared or prepares itself to welcome the monstrous arrivant, to welcome it, that is, to accord hospitality to that which is absolutely foreign or strange [….] All of history has shown that each time an event has been produced, for example in philosophy or in poetry, it took the form of the unacceptable, or even of the intolerable, or the incomprehensible, that is, of a certain monstrosity. Jacques Derrida “Passages—from (...)
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  42. Kelly Oliver & Marilyn Pearsall (eds.) (1998). Feminist Interpretations of Friedrich Nietzsche. Penn State University Press.
    Nietzsche has the reputation of being a virulent misogynist, so why are feminists interested in his philosophy? The essays in this volume provide answers to this question from a variety of feminist perspectives. The organization of the volume into two sets of essays, "Nietzsche's Use of Woman" and "Feminists' Use of Nietzsche," reflects the two general approaches taken to the issue of Nietzsche and woman. First, many debates have focused on how to interpret Nietzsche's remarks about women and femininity. (...)
     
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  43.  58
    Debra Berghoffen (2001). Menage À Trois: Freud, Beauvoir, and the Marquis de Sade. [REVIEW] Continental Philosophy Review 34 (2):151-163.
    Without rejecting Simone de Beauvoir's often cited feminist agenda, this paper takes up her less frequently noted insight – that woman's existence as the inessential other is more than a consequence of material dependency, and political inequality. This insight traces women's subordinated status to the effect of a patriarchal desire that produces and is sustained by a political imaginary that is not economically grounded and is not undermined by women's economic or political progress. Taking up this insight, this paper reads (...)
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  44.  16
    Victoria Barker (1997). Definition and the Question of "Woman". Hypatia 12 (2):185 - 215.
    Within recent feminist philosophy, controversy has developed over the desirability, and indeed, the possibility of defining the central terms of its analysis-"woman," "femininity," etc. The controversy results largely from the undertheorization of the notion of definition; feminists have uncritically adopted an Aristotelian treatment of definition as entailing metaphysical, rather than merely linguistic, commitments. A "discursive" approach to definition, by contrast, allows us to define our terms, while avoiding the dangers of essentialism and universalism.
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  45.  15
    Eva Lundgren-Gothlin (1999). Simone de Beauvoir’s Notions of Appeal, Desire, and Ambiguity and Their Relationship to Jean-Paul Sartre’s Notions of Appeal and Desire. Hypatia 14 (4):83-95.
    : This essay focuses on some important concepts in Beauvoir's philosophy: ambiguity, desire, and appeal (appel). Ambiguity and appeal, concepts originating in Beauvoir's moral philosophy, are in The Second Sex connected to the female body and feminine desire. This indicates the complexity of Beauvoir's image of femininity. This essay also proposes a comparative reading of Beauvoir's and Sartre's concepts of appeal, a reading that indicates differences in their views of the relationship among ethics, desire, and gender.
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  46.  5
    Cristian J. Oliveira Santos (2009). Religião, patologia e feminilidade: uma análise da saudade em O homem (1887), de Aluísio Azevedo. Horizonte 6 (11):89-107.
    Resumo Os estudos literários têm comumente recorrido a ferramentas auxiliares ligadas às ciências sociais, mormente à filosofia e à sociologia. Tal postura tem dado origem a análises interessantes a respeito do discurso literário como produto ideológico configurador de verdades coerentes e totalizantes no que concerne a grupos sociais diversos, o que envolve, freqüentemente, a prática de estigmatização desses na tessitura da engenharia social. Nesse contexto, o presente artigo pretende trabalhar com a representação das beatas valendo-se da análise da personagem Magdá (...)
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  47. Todd Dufresne (ed.) (1997). Returns of the French Freud:: Freud, Lacan, and Beyond. Routledge.
    Creating a snapshot of current thinking about psychoanalysis, this lively collection examines the legacy of Freud and Lacan. Through provocative and penetrating arguments, the contributors take psychoanalysis to task for 0ts dark view of human nature, theoretical sorcery, devaluation of femininity, self-referentiality, discipleship, negativity, ignorance of history and more. The essays also examine the complex relationships between Freudian and Lacanian theory and philosophy, feminism, anthropology, communications theory, deconstruction, Foucauldian genealogy and medical history. The outstanding list of contributors includes Paul (...)
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  48. Maggie Günsberg (2007). Gender and the Italian Stage: From the Renaissance to the Present Day. Cambridge University Press.
    Maggie Günsberg explores the intersection between gender portrayal and other social categories of class, age and the family in the Italian theatre from the Renaissance to the present day. She examines the developing relationship between patriarchal strategies and the formal properties of the dramatic genre such as plot, comedy and realism. She also considers conventions specific to drama in performance, including images of both femininity and masculinity. An interdisciplinary approach, drawing on semiotics, psychoanalysis, philosophy, theories of spectatorship and dramatic (...)
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  49. Maggie Günsberg (1997). Gender and the Italian Stage: From the Renaissance to the Present Day. Cambridge University Press.
    Maggie Günsberg explores the intersection between gender portrayal and other social categories of class, age and the family in the Italian theatre from the Renaissance to the present day. She examines the developing relationship between patriarchal strategies and the formal properties of the dramatic genre such as plot, comedy and realism. She also considers conventions specific to drama in performance, including images of both femininity and masculinity. An interdisciplinary approach, drawing on semiotics, psychoanalysis, philosophy, theories of spectatorship and dramatic (...)
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  50. Claire Elise Katz (2003). Levinas, Judaism, and the Feminine: The Silent Footsteps of Rebecca. Indiana University Press.
    Challenging previous interpretations of Levinas that gloss over his use of the feminine or show how he overlooks questions raised by feminists, Claire Elise Katz explores the powerful and productive links between the feminine and religion in Levinas’s work. Rather than viewing the feminine as a metaphor with no significance for women or as a means to reinforce traditional stereotypes, Katz goes beyond questions of sexual difference to reach a more profound understanding of the role of the feminine (...)
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