Search results for 'Feminism Christianity' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Black Feminism (1995). A Black Feminist Statement. In Beverly Guy-Sheftal (ed.), Words of Fire: An Anthology of African American Feminist Thought. The New Press.score: 140.0
  2. Jay B. McDaniel (1987). Self-Affirmation and Ego Transcendence: The Encounter of Christianity with Feminism and Buddhism. Buddhist-Christian Studies 7:215-232.score: 122.0
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  3. Jonathan K. Crane (2011). PERSPECTIVES ON TORTURE: Reports From a Dialogue Including Christian, Judaic, Islamic, and Feminist Viewpoints. Journal of Religious Ethics 39 (4):585-588.score: 120.0
    Torture continues to be a pressing political issue in North America, yet religious scholarly reflection on the ethics of torture remains all but sidelined in public discourse for a variety of complex reasons. These reasons are explored—and critiqued—in this collection of reflections by Christian, Jewish, Muslim, and feminist religious ethicists. These scholars find that historical amnesia, forced if not twisted readings of classical texts and contemporary human rights instruments, and sociological factors are but a few of the factors challenging contemporary (...)
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  4. Christina Van Dyke (2008). Eating as a Gendered Act: Christianity, Feminism, and Reclaiming the Body. In K. J. Clark (ed.) Readings in the Philosophy of Religion, 2nd Edition (Peterborough: Broadview Press, 2008). 475-489.score: 120.0
  5. Catharina J. M. Halkes (1991). New Creation: Christian Feminism and the Renewal of the Earth. Westminster/John Knox Press.score: 120.0
    A bold and visionary book that reveals the false and catastrophically damaging images at the root of the oppression of women and the rape of Earth's resources, ...
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  6. Richard H. Bell (1989). Ann Loades, Searching for Lost Coins: Explorations in Christianity and Feminism Pp. 118. (London: SPCK, 1987). Religious Studies 25 (4):538.score: 120.0
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  7. Margaret Daphne Hampson (1996). After Christianity. Trinity Press International.score: 90.0
     
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  8. Irene Oh (2010). Motherhood in Christianity and Islam: Critiques, Realities, and Possibilities. Journal of Religious Ethics 38 (4):638-653.score: 84.0
    Common experiences of mothering offer profound critiques of maternal ethical norms found in both Christianity and Islam. The familiar responsibilities of caring for children, assumed by the majority of Christian and Muslim women, provide the basis for reassessing sacrificial and selfless love, protesting unjust religious and political systems, and dismantling romanticized notions of childcare. As a distinctive category of women's experience, motherhood may offer valuable perspectives necessary for remedying injustices that afflict mothers and children in particular, as well as (...)
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  9. Susan Frank Parsons (1996). Feminism and Christian Ethics. Cambridge University Press.score: 80.0
    Feminists are aware of the diversity of thinking within their own tradition, and of the different approaches to moral questions in which that is manifest. This book describes and analyses that diversity by distinguishing three distinct paradigms of moral reasoning to be found within feminism. Using the writings of feminists, the major strengths and weaknesses of each theory are considered, so that creative dialogue between them can be encouraged. Three common themes are drawn out - which are also on (...)
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  10. Sólveig Anna Bóasdóttir (1998). Violence, Power, and Justice: A Feminist Contribution to Christian Sexual Ethics. Academia Upsaliensis.score: 70.0
  11. Melissa Raphael (2014). A Patrimony of Idols: Second-Wave Jewish and Christian Feminist Theology and the Criticism of Religion. Sophia 53 (2):241-259.score: 68.0
    This article suggests that second-wave feminist theology between around 1968 and 1995 undertook the quintessentially religious and task of theology, which is to break its own idols. Idoloclasm was the dynamic of Jewish and Christian feminist theological reformism and the means by which to clear a way back into its own tradition. Idoloclasm brought together an inter-religious coalition of feminists who believed that idolatry is not one of the pitfalls of patriarchy but its symptom and cause, not a subspecies of (...)
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  12. H. Stanton (2004). A Certain Creative Recklessness: Ronald Preston and Christian Feminist Ethics. Studies in Christian Ethics 17 (2):140-147.score: 56.0
    Ronald Preston wrote little of feminism, and feminism appears to have ignored Preston. There is much, however, in Preston's work which feminists would have found sympathetic, as well as some areas for acute disagreement. This article discusses what Preston did write about feminism, and goes on to examine areas of common approach: the hermeneutic of suspicion, social ethics, and a priori commitments. It also, briefly, discusses areas of disagreement: common consensus, universalism, and eschatological realism. It ends with (...)
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  13. Deidre Nicole Green (2013). Works of Love in a World of Violence: Kierkegaard, Feminism, and the Limits of Self‐Sacrifice. Hypatia 28 (3):568-584.score: 54.0
    Feminist scholars adopt wide-ranging views of self-sacrifice: their critiques claim that women are inordinately affected by Christianity's valorization of self-sacrifice and that this traditional Christian value is inherently misogynistic and necrophilic. Although Søren Kierkegaard's Works of Love deems Christian love essentially sacrificial, love, in his view, sets significant limits on the role of self-sacrifice in human life. Through his proposed response to one who requests forgiveness, “Do you now truly love me?” Kierkegaard offers a model of forgiveness that subverts (...)
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  14. Carolina Teles Lemos (2012). Mística feminista: interfaces entre místicas religiosas e místicas seculares (Feminist mystic: interfaces between religious mystic and secular mystic) - DOI: 10.5752/P.2175-5841.2012v10n27p804. [REVIEW] Horizonte 10 (27):804-830.score: 54.0
    Este artigo trata da presença da mística enquanto elemento presente e dinamizador do movimento feminista. Entende-se a mística como o mistério de preparar-se e jamais se encontrar com a totalidade daquilo que se aspira alcançar. Trata-se do mistério que move e impulsiona o sujeito para viver sua causa e construir sua utopia individual e / ou coletiva. Considera-se a mística feminista em duas dimensões: a religiosa e a secular. Entende-se que, no caso das mulheres, como a história do cristianismo no (...)
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  15. Irene S. Switankowsky (2011). Feminist Christian Encounters: The Methods and Strategies of Feminist Informed Christian Theologies. By Angela Pears, On The Cutting Edge: The Study of Women in Biblical Worlds: Essays in Honor of Elisabeth Schüssler Fiorenza. Edited by Jane Schaberg, Alice Bach, and Esther Fuchs and Writing Catholic Women: Contemporary International Catholic Girlhood Narratives. By Jeana DelRosso. [REVIEW] Heythrop Journal 52 (5):881-882.score: 50.0
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  16. Patricia Altenbernd Johnson (1992). Feminist Christian Philosophy? Faith and Philosophy 9 (3):320-334.score: 50.0
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  17. Maria Lastochkina (2013). Remedying Sexual Asymmetry with Christian Feminism: Some Orthodox Christian Reflections in Response to Erika Bachiochi, “Women, Sexual Asymmetry & Catholic Teaching”. Christian Bioethics 19 (2):172-184.score: 50.0
    Abortion has become such an indispensable part of contemporary experience that even Christians sometimes find it difficult to oppose. Since taking the life in utero has ceased to be regarded as a grave sin and is not always recognized as an unmitigated evil, those who wish to remain faithful to the Word of God struggle to find ways of speaking against killing of the unborn. Some of them, like Erika Bachiochi, seek to beat modern culture at its own game, by (...)
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  18. Grace Y. Kao (2014). Creaturely Solidarity. Journal of Religious Ethics 42 (4):743-768.score: 50.0
    This essay examines several recent contributions to the growing literature on animal ethics from Christian perspectives. I categorize the four books under review in one of three ways depending on the scholars' methodological points of departure: (1) a reconstruction of the place of other animals in Christian history through a selective retrieval of texts and practices; (2) an identification of a key Christian ethical principle; and (3) a reconsideration of foundational doctrines of systematic theology. On the premise that social ethicists (...)
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  19. Harriet Baber, Feminism and Christian Ethics1 21.score: 48.0
    Currently a number of feminists in philosophy and religious studies as well as other academic disciplines have argued that policies, practices and doctrines assumed to be sexneutral are in fact male-biased. Thus, Rosemary Reuther, reflecting on the development of theology in the Judeo-Christian tradition suggests that the long-term exclusion of women from leadership and theological education has rendered the “official theological culture” repressive to women and dismissive of women’s experience: “To begin to take women seriously,” she notes, “will involve a (...)
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  20. Nancy J. Duff (1999). Atonement and the Christian Life Reformed Doctrine From a Feminist Perspective. Interpretation 53 (1):21-33.score: 48.0
    Once the prophetic office of Christ is understood as the apocalypse of God's act of reconciliation, employing the threefold office to interpret the atonement preserves the tenets of classical Christian dogma while addressing important issues raised by feminist and womanist theologians.
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  21. Richard Grigg (1995). When God Becomes Goddess: The Transformation of American Religion. Continuum.score: 48.0
     
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  22. Ursule Molinaro (1989). A Christian Martyr in Reverse Hypatia: 370 - 415 A. D.: A Vivid Portrait of the Life and Death of Hypatia as Seen Through the Eyes of a Feminist Poet and Novelist. [REVIEW] Hypatia 4 (1):6 - 8.score: 42.0
    The torture killing of the noted philosopher Hypatia by a mob of Christians in Alexandria in 415 AD marks the end of a time when women were still appreciated for the brain under their hair.
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  23. J. Shaw (1997). Book Reviews : Feminism and Christian Ethics, by Susan Frank Parsons. Cambridge University Press, 1996. 279 Pp. Pb. 11.95. Hb. 35.00. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 10 (2):116-119.score: 42.0
  24. Miriam Levering (2003). Religious Feminism and the Future of the Planet: A Buddhist-Christian Conversation (Review). Buddhist-Christian Studies 23 (1):157-158.score: 42.0
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  25. Sarah Katherine Pinnock (2003). Religious Feminism and the Future of the Planet: A Buddhist-Christian Conversation (Review). Buddhist-Christian Studies 23 (1):155-157.score: 42.0
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  26. Xiao Wei (2007). Caring: Confucianism, Feminism, and Christian Ethics. Contemporary Chinese Thought 39 (2):32-48.score: 40.0
  27. Nannerl O. Keohane (1982). Feminist Scholarship and Human Nature:Woman and Nature. Susan Griffin; Women in Western Political Thought. Susan Moller Okin; Women of Spirit: Female Leadership in the Jewish and Christian Traditions. Rosemary Ruether, Eleanor McLaughlin; The Nature of Woman: An Encyclopedia and Guide to the Literature. Mary Anne Warren; Equality and the Rights of Women. Elizabeth H. Wolgast. [REVIEW] Ethics 93 (1):102-.score: 40.0
  28. Ursula King (1984). Rosemary Radford Ruether. Sexism and God–Talk. Towards a Feminist Theology Pp. 291 +Xii (London: SCM Press 1983.) £7.95 Pb.Elisabeth Schüssler Fiorenza. In Memory of Her. A Feminist Theological Reconstruction of Christian Origins. Pp. 357 + Xxv (London: SCM Press 1983.) £8.50 Pb. [REVIEW] Religious Studies 20 (4):699-702.score: 40.0
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  29. Jean-Yves Lacoste (1986). Elisabeth Schüssler Fiorenza, In Memory of Her. A Feminist Theological Reconstruction of Christian Origins. Revue Philosophique De Louvain 84 (62):275-277.score: 40.0
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  30. Joy Ann Mcdougall (2008). Keeping Feminist Faith with Christian Traditions: A Look at Christian Feminist Theology Today. Modern Theology 24 (1):103-124.score: 40.0
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  31. Gail P. C. Streete (forthcoming). Book Review: Introducing Redemption In Christian Feminism. [REVIEW] Interpretation 54 (1):102-104.score: 40.0
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  32. Jane Duran (2000). Mary Astell: A Pre-Humean Christian Empiricist and Feminist. In Cecile T. Tougas & Sara Ebenreck (eds.), Presenting Women Philosophers. Temple University Press.score: 40.0
     
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  33. J. O. Y. Mcdougall (2008). Keeping Feminist Faith with Christian Traditions: A Look at Christian Feminist Theology Today. Modern Theology 24 (1):103-124.score: 40.0
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  34. Anne E. Patrick (1996). Liberating Conscience: Feminist Explorations in Catholic Moral Theology. Continuum.score: 40.0
     
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  35. Colin Grant (2001). Altruism and Christian Ethics. Cambridge University Press.score: 38.0
    Separated from its anchorage in religion, ethics has followed the social sciences in seeing human beings as fundamentally characterized by self-interest, so that altruism is either naively idealistic or arrogantly self-sufficient. Colin Grant contends that, as a modern secular concept, altruism is a parody on the self-giving love of Christianity, so that its dismissal represents a social levelling that loses the depths that theology makes intelligible and religion makes possible. The Christian affirmation is that God is characterized (...)
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  36. Christine E. Gudorf (2004). Feminism and Postmodernism in Susan Frank Parsons. [REVIEW] Journal of Religious Ethics 32 (3):519 - 543.score: 38.0
    Reviewing "The Ethics of Gender, Feminism and Christian Ethics," and "The Cambridge Companion to Feminist Theology," the author suggests that Susan Parsons responds to questions postmodernism has posed to both feminism and Christian ethics by using insights gained from various accounts of the moral subject found in feminist philosophy, ethics, and theology. Hesitant to embrace postmodernism's critique of the possibility of ethics, Parsons redefines ethics by establishing a moral point of view within discursive communities. Yet in her brief (...)
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  37. Maria Diaconescu (2010). Contribuţii şi limite ale feminismului în asistenţa sociala/ Contributions and Limits of Feminism in Social Work. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 5 (14):112-119.score: 38.0
    Today, the feminist ideologies and practices, the philosophies in action and the academic gender studies are all forms of the emancipation of women. All these are intimately related by the feminization and professionalization of social work. The common view identifies social work with those who deal with adoptions, philantropy and Christian charity, and more recently with the dehumanizing beaurocracy of the local offices for social protection. Yet, a great proportion of those who deal with all these things are women. In (...)
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  38. Marilyn J. Legge (1992). The Grace of Difference: A Canadian Feminist Theological Ethic. OUP USA.score: 36.0
    Marion J. Legge addresses theological ethics from the context of Canadian women -- especially the experience of marginalized women in Canada. Beginning with a critical reassessment of Canadian Radical Christianity, she argues that approches that center on question of economic justice have nevertheless overlooked the day-to-day economic realities of Canadian women. Legge develops a reformulated critical theory of culture that, though it emphasizes difference, avoids premature abstraction and misplaced generalizations. She seeks a voice to articulate the theological and ethical (...)
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  39. Ann Mongoven (2003). Sharing Our Body and Blood: Organ Donation and Feminist Critiques of Sacrifice. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 28 (1):89 – 114.score: 30.0
    Feminist analysis of cultural mythology surrounding organ donation offers a critical perspective on current U.S. transplant policy. My argument is three-pronged. First, I argue that organ donation is appropriately understood as a sacrifice. Structurally, donation accords both to general and to specifically Christian archetypes of sacrifice. The characterization of donation as sacrifice resonates in the cultural psyche even though it is absent in public rhetoric. Second, I characterize widespread feminist concerns about the over-glorification of sacrifice. These concerns provide a helpful (...)
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  40. Dorothy G. Rogers (2004). Before "Care": Marietta Kies, Lucia Ames Mead, and Feminist Political Theory. Hypatia 19 (2):105-117.score: 30.0
    : Marietta Kies and Lucia Ames Mead were two late nineteenth-century thinkers who anticipated the late twentieth-century feminist "ethic of care." Kies drew on Hegel's philosophy to develop a political theory of altruism. Ames Mead adopted Kant's theory of peace and established a pacifist theory based on international cooperation. Both Kies and Mead insisted that the prototypically "feminine" ideals they espoused are rational, not emotional, responses to modern political life, and are essential to good political practice. Kies was a member (...)
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  41. Robin James (2011). &Quot;feminist Aesthetics, Popular Music, and the Politics of the 'Mainstream'&Quot;. In L. Ryan Musgrave (ed.), Feminist Aesthetics and Philosophy of Art. Springer.score: 27.0
    While feminist aestheticians have long interrogated gendered, raced, and classed hierarchies in the arts, feminist philosophers still don’t talk much about popular music. Even though Angela Davis and bell hooks have seriously engaged popular music, they are often situated on the margins of philosophy. It is my contention that feminist aesthetics has a lot to offer to the study of popular music, and the case of popular music points feminist aesthetics to some of its own limitations and unasked questions. This (...)
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  42. Seyla Benhabib (ed.) (1995). Feminist Contentions: A Philosophical Exchange. Routledge.score: 27.0
    This unique volume presents a debate between four of the top feminist theorists in the US today, discussing the key questions facing contemporary feminist theory, responding to each other, and distinguishing their views from others.
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  43. Drucilla K. Barker & Edith Kuiper (eds.) (2003). Toward a Feminist Philosophy of Economics. Routledge.score: 27.0
    Feminist economists have demonstrated that interrogating hierarchies based on gender, ethnicity, class and nation results in an economics that is biased and more faithful to empirical evidence than are mainstream accounts. This rigorous and comprehensive book examines many of the central philosophical questions and themes in feminist economics including: · History of economics · Feminist science studies · Identity and agency · Caring labor · Postcolonialism and postmodernism With contributions from such leading figures as Nancy Folbre, Julie Nelson and Sandra (...)
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  44. Sarah Franklin, Celia Lury & Jackie Stacey (eds.) (1991). Off-Centre: Feminism and Cultural Studies. Harpercollins Academic.score: 27.0
    This indispensible collection brings together feminist theory and cultural studies, looking at issues such as pop culture and the media, science and technology, ...
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  45. Rosemary Auchmuty (2012). Law and the Power of Feminism: How Marriage Lost its Power to Oppress Women. Feminist Legal Studies 20 (2):71-87.score: 27.0
    In Feminism and the Power of Law Carol Smart argued that feminists should use non-legal strategies rather than looking to law to bring about women’s liberation. This article seeks to demonstrate that, as far as marriage is concerned, she was right. Statistics and contemporary commentary show how marriage, once the ultimate and only acceptable status for women, has declined in social significance to such an extent that today it is a mere lifestyle choice. This is due to many factors, (...)
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  46. Rosemary Hunter (2012). The Power of Feminist Judgments? Feminist Legal Studies 20 (2):135-148.score: 27.0
    Recent years have seen the advent of two feminist judgment-writing projects, the Women’s Court of Canada, and the Feminist Judgments Project in England. This article analyses these projects in light of Carol Smart’s feminist critique of law and legal reform and her proposed feminist strategies in Feminism and the Power of Law (1989). At the same time, it reflects on Smart’s arguments 20 years after their first publication and considers the extent to which feminist judgment-writing projects may reinforce or (...)
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  47. Alice Belcher (2000). A Feminist Perspective on Contract Theories From Law and Economics. Feminist Legal Studies 8 (1):29-46.score: 27.0
    This article offers a feminist perspective on contract theories in law,economics and law-and-economics. It identifies masculine traits presentcontract theories in all three disciplines. It then describes andassesses some developments that appear to be ‘feminising’: Therecognition of the importance of social norms in contract theory andtheories of contract as relationship. The article's main claim is that amasculine model of decision-making persists even within the less overtlymasculine models of contract. The problem of sexually transmitted debtresulting from a surety contract is analysed in (...)
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  48. Maria Drakopoulou (2000). The Ethic of Care, Female Subjectivity and Feminist Legal Scholarship. Feminist Legal Studies 8 (2):199-226.score: 27.0
    The object of this essay is to explore the central role played by the ‘ethic of care’ in debates within and beyond feminist legal theory. The author claims that the ethic of care has attracted feminist legal scholars in particular, as a means of resolving the theoretical, political and strategic difficulties to which the perceived ‘crisis of subjectivity’ in feminist theory has given rise. She argues that feminist legal scholars are peculiarly placed in relation to this crisis because of their (...)
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  49. Aisha K. Gill (2013). Feminist Reflections on Researching So-Called 'Honour' Killings. Feminist Legal Studies 21 (3):241-261.score: 27.0
    Drawing on 2 years of field research conducted between 2008 and 2010 in London’s Kurdish community, I discuss the practical and ethical challenges that confront researchers dealing with violence against women committed in the name of ‘honour’. In examining how feminist methodologies and principles inform my research, I address issues of researcher positioning and the importance of speaking with, rather than for, marginalised groups. I then explore the difficulties of operationalising this position when dealing with honour-based violence. Using the interview (...)
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  50. Harriet Samuels (2013). Feminizing Human Rights Adjudication: Feminist Method and the Proportionality Principle. [REVIEW] Feminist Legal Studies 21 (1):39-60.score: 27.0
    Proportionality is one of the most important adjudicatory tools, in human rights decision-making, primarily employed to balance rights and interests. Despite this there is very little feminist analysis of its use by the courts. This article discusses the doctrine of proportionality and considers its amenability to feminist legal methods. It relies on theories of deliberative democracy to argue that the proportionality test can be applied in a manner that facilitates a more “interactive universalism”, allows for greater participation in decision-making and (...)
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