Search results for 'Feminism Christianity' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  38
    Black Feminism (1995). A Black Feminist Statement. In Beverly Guy-Sheftal (ed.), Words of Fire: An Anthology of African American Feminist Thought. The New Press
  2. Yvonne Yazbeck Haddad & John L. Esposito (2001). Daughters of Abraham Feminist Thought in Judaism, Christianity, and Islam.
     
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  3. Daniel J. Meckel & R. Laurence Moore (1990). Jung and Christianity in Dialogue Faith, Feminism, and Hermeneutics.
     
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  4. Kelly Denton-Borhaug (2015). Women, Ethics, and Inequality in US Healthcare: “To Count Among the Living” by Aana Marie Vigen, And: New Feminist Christianity: Many Voices, Many Views Ed. By Mary E. Hunt and Diann L. Neu. [REVIEW] Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics 35 (1):202-205.
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  5.  91
    Christina Van Dyke (2008). Eating as a Gendered Act: Christianity, Feminism, and Reclaiming the Body. In K. J. Clark (ed.) Readings in the Philosophy of Religion, 2nd Edition (Peterborough: Broadview Press, 2008). 475-489.
  6.  2
    Jay B. McDaniel (1987). Self-Affirmation and Ego Transcendence: The Encounter of Christianity with Feminism and Buddhism. Buddhist-Christian Studies 7:215-232.
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  7. Richard H. Bell (1989). Ann Loades, Searching for Lost Coins: Explorations in Christianity and Feminism Pp. 118. Religious Studies 25 (4):538.
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  8.  5
    Catharina J. M. Halkes (1991). New Creation: Christian Feminism and the Renewal of the Earth. Westminster/John Knox Press.
    A bold and visionary book that reveals the false and catastrophically damaging images at the root of the oppression of women and the rape of Earth's resources, ...
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  9. Margaret Daphne Hampson (1996). After Christianity. Trinity Press International.
     
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  10.  18
    Jonathan K. Crane (2011). PERSPECTIVES ON TORTURE: Reports From a Dialogue Including Christian, Judaic, Islamic, and Feminist Viewpoints. Journal of Religious Ethics 39 (4):585-588.
    Torture continues to be a pressing political issue in North America, yet religious scholarly reflection on the ethics of torture remains all but sidelined in public discourse for a variety of complex reasons. These reasons are explored—and critiqued—in this collection of reflections by Christian, Jewish, Muslim, and feminist religious ethicists. These scholars find that historical amnesia, forced if not twisted readings of classical texts and contemporary human rights instruments, and sociological factors are but a few of the factors challenging contemporary (...)
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  11.  15
    Irene Oh (2010). Motherhood in Christianity and Islam: Critiques, Realities, and Possibilities. Journal of Religious Ethics 38 (4):638-653.
    Common experiences of mothering offer profound critiques of maternal ethical norms found in both Christianity and Islam. The familiar responsibilities of caring for children, assumed by the majority of Christian and Muslim women, provide the basis for reassessing sacrificial and selfless love, protesting unjust religious and political systems, and dismantling romanticized notions of childcare. As a distinctive category of women's experience, motherhood may offer valuable perspectives necessary for remedying injustices that afflict mothers and children in particular, as well (...)
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  12. Marilyn J. Legge (1992). The Grace of Difference: A Canadian Feminist Theological Ethic. OUP Usa.
    Marion J. Legge addresses theological ethics from the context of Canadian women -- especially the experience of marginalized women in Canada. Beginning with a critical reassessment of Canadian Radical Christianity, she argues that approches that center on question of economic justice have nevertheless overlooked the day-to-day economic realities of Canadian women. Legge develops a reformulated critical theory of culture that, though it emphasizes difference, avoids premature abstraction and misplaced generalizations. She seeks a voice to articulate the theological and ethical (...)
     
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  13. Rita M. Gross & Rosemary Radford Ruether (2001). Religious Feminism and the Future of the Planet a Christian-Buddhist Conversation. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
  14. Arlene Swidler & Walter E. Conn (1985). Mainstreaming Feminist Research for Teaching Religious Studies. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
  15.  22
    Deidre Nicole Green (2013). Works of Love in a World of Violence: Kierkegaard, Feminism, and the Limits of Self‐Sacrifice. Hypatia 28 (3):568-584.
    Feminist scholars adopt wide-ranging views of self-sacrifice: their critiques claim that women are inordinately affected by Christianity's valorization of self-sacrifice and that this traditional Christian value is inherently misogynistic and necrophilic. Although Søren Kierkegaard's Works of Love deems Christian love essentially sacrificial, love, in his view, sets significant limits on the role of self-sacrifice in human life. Through his proposed response to one who requests forgiveness, “Do you now truly love me?” Kierkegaard offers a model of forgiveness that subverts (...)
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  16.  5
    Carolina Teles Lemos (2012). Mística feminista: interfaces entre místicas religiosas e místicas seculares (Feminist mystic: interfaces between religious mystic and secular mystic) - DOI: 10.5752/P.2175-5841.2012v10n27p804. [REVIEW] Horizonte 10 (27):804-830.
    Este artigo trata da presença da mística enquanto elemento presente e dinamizador do movimento feminista. Entende-se a mística como o mistério de preparar-se e jamais se encontrar com a totalidade daquilo que se aspira alcançar. Trata-se do mistério que move e impulsiona o sujeito para viver sua causa e construir sua utopia individual e / ou coletiva. Considera-se a mística feminista em duas dimensões: a religiosa e a secular. Entende-se que, no caso das mulheres, como a história do cristianismo no (...)
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  17.  6
    Roland J. Teske (2008). Feminist Interpretations of Augustine: Re-Reading the Canon (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 46 (3):pp. 480-481.
    This present volume is the twenty-ninth in the Re-Reading the Canon series, the title of each of which volumes begins Feminist Interpretations of . . . . Surprisingly, the volume on Augustine has appeared relatively late in the series. The editor has collected eleven essays plus a poem on feminist interpretations of the bishop of Hippo, who has certainly exerted a powerful influence on the view of women in the Western Christian churches of all major denominations. Besides the essays, Stark (...)
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  18. Judith Chelius Stark (ed.) (2007). Feminist Interpretations of Saint Augustine. Penn State University Press.
    Since the establishment of Christianity in the West as a major religious tradition, Augustine has been considered a principal architect of the ways philosophy can be used for reasoning about faith. In particular, Augustine effected the joining of Platonism with Christian belief for the Middle Ages and beyond. The results of his enterprise continue to be felt, especially with regard to the contested topics of human embodiment, sexuality, and the nature and roles of women. As a result, few thinkers (...)
     
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  19. Mary Daly (1986). Beyond God the Father Toward a Philosophy of Women's Liberation. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
  20.  4
    Grace Y. Kao (2014). Creaturely Solidarity. Journal of Religious Ethics 42 (4):743-768.
    This essay examines several recent contributions to the growing literature on animal ethics from Christian perspectives. I categorize the four books under review in one of three ways depending on the scholars' methodological points of departure: a reconstruction of the place of other animals in Christian history through a selective retrieval of texts and practices; an identification of a key Christian ethical principle; and a reconsideration of foundational doctrines of systematic theology. On the premise that social ethicists are interested in (...)
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  21. Richard Grigg (1995). When God Becomes Goddess: The Transformation of American Religion. Continuum.
     
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  22. Rosemary Radford Ruether (1981). To Change the World Christology and Cultural Criticism. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  23.  44
    Judith Butler (1990). Gender Trouble: Feminism and the Subversion of Identity. Routledge.
    Contemporary feminist debates over the meanings of gender lead time and again to a certain sense of trouble, as if the indeterminacy of gender might eventually culminate in the failure of feminism. Perhaps trouble need not carry such a..
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  24.  39
    Sandra G. Harding (1988). [Book Review] the Science Question in Feminism. [REVIEW] Feminist Studies 14 (1):561-574.
    This essay is a critical review of Sandra Harding's The Science Question in Feminism. Her text constitutes a monumental effort to capture an overview of recent feminist critique of science and to develop a feminist dialectical and materialist conception of the history of masculinist science. In this analysis of Harding's work, the organizing categories as well as the main assumptions of the text are reconstructed for closer examination within the context of modern feminist critique of science and feminist theory (...)
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  25.  16
    S. Bordo (2004). Unbearable Weight: Feminism, Western Culture, and the Body. University of California Press.
    Feminism, Western Culture, and the Body Susan Bordo. Tiegs, Cheryl, 163 Timaeus (Plato), 34 Time, 193, 268, 269 Tom Jones, 110, 116-17 Torture, public, 143 Totalization, and "difference," 259, 260 Toys, children's, 263 Transcendence, 4, ...
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  26.  25
    Rosi Braidotti (2011). Nomadic Subjects: Embodiment and Sexual Difference in Contemporary Feminist Theory. Columbia University Press.
    Introduction -- By way of nomadism -- Context and generations -- Sexual difference theory -- On the female feminist subject : from "she-self" to "she-other" -- Sexual difference as a nomadic political project -- Organs without bodies -- Images without imagination -- Mothers, monsters, and machines -- Discontinuous becomings : Deleuze and the becoming-woman of philosophy -- Envy and ingratitude: men in feminism -- Conclusion. Geometries of passion : a conversation.
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  27. Robin James (2011). Feminist Aesthetics, Popular Music, and the Politics of the 'Mainstream'. In L. Ryan Musgrave (ed.), Feminist Aesthetics and Philosophy of Art. Springer
    While feminist aestheticians have long interrogated gendered, raced, and classed hierarchies in the arts, feminist philosophers still don’t talk much about popular music. Even though Angela Davis and bell hooks have seriously engaged popular music, they are often situated on the margins of philosophy. It is my contention that feminist aesthetics has a lot to offer to the study of popular music, and the case of popular music points feminist aesthetics to some of its own limitations and unasked questions. This (...)
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  28. Catriona Mackenzie & Natalie Stoljar (eds.) (2000). Relational Autonomy: Feminist Perspectives on Automony, Agency, and the Social Self. Oxford University Press.
    This collection of original essays explores the social and relational dimensions of individual autonomy. Rejecting the feminist charge that autonomy is inherently masculinist, the contributors draw on feminist critiques of autonomy to challenge and enrich contemporary philosophical debates about agency, identity, and moral responsibility. The essays analyze the complex ways in which oppression can impair an agent's capacity for autonomy, and investigate connections, neglected by standard accounts, between autonomy and other aspects of the agent, including self-conception, self-worth, memory, and the (...)
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  29.  74
    Seyla Benhabib (ed.) (1995). Feminist Contentions: A Philosophical Exchange. Routledge.
    This unique volume presents a debate between four of the top feminist theorists in the US today, discussing the key questions facing contemporary feminist theory, responding to each other, and distinguishing their views from others.
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  30. Thérèse Murphy & Noel Whitty (2006). The Question of Evil and Feminist Legal Scholarship. Feminist Legal Studies 14 (1):1-26.
    In this article, we argue that feminist legal scholars should engage directly and explicitly with the question of evil. Part I summarises key facts surrounding the prosecution and life-long imprisonment of Myra Hindley, one of a tiny number of women involved in multiple killings of children in recent British history. Part II reviews a range of commentaries on Hindley, noting in particular the repeated use of two narratives: the first of these insists that Hindley is an icon of female (...)
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  31.  68
    Ranjoo Seodu Herr (2014). Reclaiming Third World Feminism: Or Why Transnational Feminism Needs Third World Feminism. Meridians: Feminism, Race, Transnationalism 12 (1).
    Third World and transnational feminisms have emerged in opposition to white second-wave feminists’ single-pronged analyses of gender oppression that elided Third World women’s multiple and complex oppressions in their various social locations. Consequently, these feminisms share two “Third World feminist” mandates: First, feminist analyses of Third World women’s oppression and resistance should be historically situated; and second, Third World women’s agency and voices should be respected. Despite these shared mandates, they have diverged in their proper domains of investigation, with transnational (...)
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  32.  70
    Anne Bottomley (2004). Shock to Thought: An Encounter (of a Third Kind) with Legal Feminism. [REVIEW] Feminist Legal Studies 12 (1):29-65.
    This paper takes a recently published text and, in examining it closely, argues that it exemplifies trends within feminist scholarship in law, which might be characterised asestablishing a form of orthodoxy. The paper explores some of the ways in which thiso rthodoxy is constructed and presented, and argues that it is characterised by a commitment both to `grand theory' and Hegelian dialectics. The adoption of this model of work seems to offer a chance to hold together the triangular figure of (...)
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  33.  86
    Elizabeth Spelman (1988). Inessential Woman: Problems of Exclusion in Feminist Thought. Beacon Press.
    It surely would lighten the tasks of feminism tremendously if we could cut to the quick of women's lives by focusing on some essential "woman- ness." However, though all women are women, no woman is only a woman. Those of us who have  ...
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  34.  9
    Rosemary Hunter (2012). The Power of Feminist Judgments? Feminist Legal Studies 20 (2):135-148.
    Recent years have seen the advent of two feminist judgment-writing projects, the Women’s Court of Canada, and the Feminist Judgments Project in England. This article analyses these projects in light of Carol Smart’s feminist critique of law and legal reform and her proposed feminist strategies in Feminism and the Power of Law (1989). At the same time, it reflects on Smart’s arguments 20 years after their first publication and considers the extent to which feminist judgment-writing projects may reinforce or (...)
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  35.  11
    Wendy Larcombe (2011). Falling Rape Conviction Rates: (Some) Feminist Aims and Measures for Rape Law. [REVIEW] Feminist Legal Studies 19 (1):27-45.
    Rape conviction rates have fallen to all-time lows in recent years, prompting governments to explore a range of strategies to improve them. This paper argues that, while the current legal impunity for rape cannot be condoned, increasing conviction rates is not in itself a valid objective of law reform. The paper problematises the measure of rape law that conviction rates provide by developing an account of (some) feminist aims for rape law reform. Three feminist aims and associated measures are explained—all (...)
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  36.  12
    Claire Young & Susan Boyd (2006). Losing the Feminist Voice? Debates on The Legal Recognition of Same Sex Partnerships in Canada. Feminist Legal Studies 14 (2):213-240.
    Over the last decade, legal recognition of same-sex relationships in Canada has accelerated. By and large, same-sex cohabitants are now recognised in the same manner as opposite-sex cohabitants, and same-sex marriage was legalised in 2005. Without diminishing the struggle that lesbians and gay men have endured to secure this somewhat revolutionary legal recognition, this article troubles its narrative of progress. In particular, we investigate the terms on which recent legal struggles have advanced, as well as the ways in which resistance (...)
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  37. Virginia Held (1993). Feminist Morality: Transforming Culture, Society, and Politics. University of Chicago Press.
    How is feminism changing the way women and men think, feel, and act? Virginia Held explores how feminist theory is changing contemporary views of moral choice. She proposes a comprehensive philosophy of feminist ethics, arguing persuasively for reconceptualizations of the self of relations between the self and others and of images of birth and death, nurturing and violence. Held shows how social, political, and cultural institutions have traditionally been founded upon masculine ideals of morality. She then identifies a distinct (...)
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  38. Margaret Urban Walker (2007). Moral Understandings: A Feminist Study in Ethics. Oxford University Press.
    This is a revised edition of Walker's well-known book in feminist ethics first published in 1997. Walker's book proposes a view of morality and an approach to ethical theory which uses the critical insights of feminism and race theory to rethink the epistemological and moral position of the ethical theorist, and how moral theory is inescapably shaped by culture and history. The main gist of her book is that morality is embodied in "practices of responsibility" that express our identities, (...)
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  39.  31
    Sarah Franklin, Celia Lury & Jackie Stacey (eds.) (1991). Off-Centre: Feminism and Cultural Studies. Harpercollins Academic.
    This indispensible collection brings together feminist theory and cultural studies, looking at issues such as pop culture and the media, science and technology, ...
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  40. Michèle Barrett & Anne Phillips (eds.) (1992). Destabilizing Theory: Contemporary Feminist Debates. Stanford University Press.
    In the past decade the central principles of western feminist theory have been dramatically challenged. many feminists have endorsed post-structuralism's rejection of essentialist theoretical categories, and have added a powerful gender dimension to contemporary critiques of modernity. Earlier 'women' have been radically undermined, and newer concerns with 'difference', 'identity', and 'power' have emerged. Destabilizing Theory explores these developments in a set of specially commissioned essays by feminist theorists. Does this change amount to a real shift within (...)
     
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  41.  14
    Rosemary Auchmuty (2012). Law and the Power of Feminism: How Marriage Lost its Power to Oppress Women. Feminist Legal Studies 20 (2):71-87.
    In Feminism and the Power of Law Carol Smart argued that feminists should use non-legal strategies rather than looking to law to bring about women’s liberation. This article seeks to demonstrate that, as far as marriage is concerned, she was right. Statistics and contemporary commentary show how marriage, once the ultimate and only acceptable status for women, has declined in social significance to such an extent that today it is a mere lifestyle choice. This is due to many factors, (...)
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  42.  32
    Alison Reiheld (2008). Feminism, Food, and the Politics of Home Cooking. American Philosophical Association Newsletter on Feminism and Philosophy 8 (1):19-20.
    In this paper, I argue the cooking is a fraught issue for women, and especially women who self-identify as feminist, because it is so deeply gendered.
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  43.  8
    Ratna Kapur (2012). Pink Chaddis and SlutWalk Couture: The Postcolonial Politics of Feminism Lite. [REVIEW] Feminist Legal Studies 20 (1):1-20.
    The SlutWalk campaigns around the world have triggered a furious debate on whether they advance or limit feminist legal politics. This article examines the location of campaigns such as the SlutWalk marches in the context of feminist legal advocacy in postcolonial India, and discusses whether their emergence signifies the demise of feminism or its incarnation in a different guise. The author argues that the SlutWalks, much like the Pink Chaddi (panty) campaign in India, provide an important normative and discursive (...)
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  44.  8
    Jill Marshall (2006). Feminist Jurisprudence: Keeping the Subject Alive. Feminist Legal Studies 14 (1):27-51.
    One of the main purposes of feminist jurisprudence is to create or find better ways of being and living for women through the analysis, critique, and use of law. Rich work has emerged, and continues to emerge, from feminist theorists exploring conceptions of the self, personhood, identity and subjectivity that could be used to form a basic unit in law and politics. In this article, it is argued that a strong sense of human subjectivity needs to be retained to enable (...)
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  45.  11
    Maria Drakopoulou (2000). The Ethic of Care, Female Subjectivity and Feminist Legal Scholarship. Feminist Legal Studies 8 (2):199-226.
    The object of this essay is to explore the central role played by the ‘ethic of care’ in debates within and beyond feminist legal theory. The author claims that the ethic of care has attracted feminist legal scholars in particular, as a means of resolving the theoretical, political and strategic difficulties to which the perceived ‘crisis of subjectivity’ in feminist theory has given rise. She argues that feminist legal scholars are peculiarly placed in relation to this crisis because of their (...)
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  46.  10
    Beverley Baines (2009). Contextualism, Feminism, and a Canadian Woman Judge. Feminist Legal Studies 17 (1):27-42.
    Feminist legal scholars have never cut the first woman appointed to the Supreme Court of Canada as much slack as the second. Yet the first, Justice Bertha Wilson, introduced the contextual method into the Court’s jurisprudence. Her approach to contextualism is consistent with one of three feminist legal methods that Katharine T. Bartlett identifies. More specifically, it is consistent with Bartlett’s feminist practical reasoning. However, Justice Wilson’s contextualism is not without its critics. The most challenging, Ruth Colker, contends it must (...)
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  47. Nancy Daukas (2011). Altogether Now: A Virtue-Theoretic Approach to Pluralism in Feminist Epistemology In. In Heidi Grasswick (ed.), Feminist Epistemology and Philosophy of Science: Power in Knowledge.
    In this paper I develop and support a feminist virtue epistemology and bring it into conversation with feminist contextual empiricism and feminist standpoint theory. The virtue theory I develop is centered on the virtue of epistemic trustworthiness, which foregrounds the social/political character of knowledge practices and products, and the differences between epistemic agencies that perpetuate, on the one hand, and displace, on the other hand, normative patterns of unjust epistemic discrimination. I argue that my view answers (...)
     
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  48.  5
    Erinn Cunniff Gilson (2015). Vulnerability, Relationality, and Dependency: Feminist Conceptual Resources for Food Justice. Ijfab: International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 8 (2):10-46.
    The contemporary industrialized global food system has sustained an onslaught of criticism from diverse parties—academic and popular, scientists and social justice advocates, activists and intellectuals—criticism that has only intensified in the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries. Feminist voices have made substantial contributions to these critiques, calling attention to the cultural politics of food and health ; to the impact of the corporatization of agriculture on food quality, the environment, and the people of the Global South, especially women ; and (...)
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  49.  24
    Lisa Tessman (2009). Feminist Eudaimonism: Eudaimonism as Non-Ideal Theory. In Feminist Ethics and Social and Political Philosophy: Theorizing the Non-Ideal. Springer 47--58.
    This paper considers whether eudaimonism is necessarily an idealizing approach to ethics. I argue, contrary to what is implied by Christine Swanton, that it is not, and I suggest that a non-ideal eudaimonistic virtue ethics can be useful for feminist and critical race theorists. For eudaimonist theorists in the Aristotelian tradition, the claim that one should aim to live virtuously assumes that there will typically be good enough background conditions so that an exercise of the virtues, in conjunction with these (...)
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  50.  7
    Eileen V. Fegan (1999). `Subjects' of Regulation/Resistance? Postmodern Feminism and Agency in Abortion-Decision-Making. Feminist Legal Studies 7 (3):241-273.
    This article explores the epistemological and strategic issues facing feminists embarking upon narrative explorations into women's experiences. It considers the implications for feminist epistemology of acknowledging women's participation in dominant ideologies about their social role. Focusing upon questions of women's agency, it asks how this `conforming knowledge' might complicate postmodernist feminist notions of resisting and reconstructing law's categorisation of `Woman'. It also represents an attempt to clarify, in advance of my own analysis of women's agency in abortion decision-making, why postmodern (...)
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