Search results for 'Feminism Christianity' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Black Feminism (1995). A Black Feminist Statement. In Beverly Guy-Sheftal (ed.), Words of Fire: An Anthology of African American Feminist Thought. The New Press.score: 100.0
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  2. Jonathan K. Crane (2011). PERSPECTIVES ON TORTURE: Reports From a Dialogue Including Christian, Judaic, Islamic, and Feminist Viewpoints. Journal of Religious Ethics 39 (4):585-588.score: 48.0
    Torture continues to be a pressing political issue in North America, yet religious scholarly reflection on the ethics of torture remains all but sidelined in public discourse for a variety of complex reasons. These reasons are explored—and critiqued—in this collection of reflections by Christian, Jewish, Muslim, and feminist religious ethicists. These scholars find that historical amnesia, forced if not twisted readings of classical texts and contemporary human rights instruments, and sociological factors are but a few of the factors challenging contemporary (...)
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  3. Catharina J. M. Halkes (1991). New Creation: Christian Feminism and the Renewal of the Earth. Westminster/John Knox Press.score: 48.0
    A bold and visionary book that reveals the false and catastrophically damaging images at the root of the oppression of women and the rape of Earth's resources, ...
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  4. Margaret Daphne Hampson (1996). After Christianity. Trinity Press International.score: 39.0
     
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  5. Jay B. McDaniel (1987). Self-Affirmation and Ego Transcendence: The Encounter of Christianity with Feminism and Buddhism. Buddhist-Christian Studies 7:215-232.score: 37.0
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  6. Irene Oh (2010). Motherhood in Christianity and Islam: Critiques, Realities, and Possibilities. Journal of Religious Ethics 38 (4):638-653.score: 36.0
    Common experiences of mothering offer profound critiques of maternal ethical norms found in both Christianity and Islam. The familiar responsibilities of caring for children, assumed by the majority of Christian and Muslim women, provide the basis for reassessing sacrificial and selfless love, protesting unjust religious and political systems, and dismantling romanticized notions of childcare. As a distinctive category of women's experience, motherhood may offer valuable perspectives necessary for remedying injustices that afflict mothers and children in particular, as well as (...)
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  7. Susan Frank Parsons (1996). Feminism and Christian Ethics. Cambridge University Press.score: 36.0
    Feminists are aware of the diversity of thinking within their own tradition, and of the different approaches to moral questions in which that is manifest. This book describes and analyses that diversity by distinguishing three distinct paradigms of moral reasoning to be found within feminism. Using the writings of feminists, the major strengths and weaknesses of each theory are considered, so that creative dialogue between them can be encouraged. Three common themes are drawn out - which are also on (...)
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  8. Christina Van Dyke (2008). Eating as a Gendered Act: Christianity, Feminism, and Reclaiming the Body. In K. J. Clark (ed.) Readings in the Philosophy of Religion, 2nd Edition (Peterborough: Broadview Press, 2008). 475-489.score: 36.0
  9. Richard H. Bell (1989). Ann Loades, Searching for Lost Coins: Explorations in Christianity and Feminism Pp. 118. (London: SPCK, 1987). Religious Studies 25 (4):538.score: 36.0
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  10. Sólveig Anna Bóasdóttir (1998). Violence, Power, and Justice: A Feminist Contribution to Christian Sexual Ethics. Academia Upsaliensis.score: 30.0
  11. Richard Grigg (1995). When God Becomes Goddess: The Transformation of American Religion. Continuum.score: 24.0
     
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  12. H. Stanton (2004). A Certain Creative Recklessness: Ronald Preston and Christian Feminist Ethics. Studies in Christian Ethics 17 (2):140-147.score: 22.0
    Ronald Preston wrote little of feminism, and feminism appears to have ignored Preston. There is much, however, in Preston's work which feminists would have found sympathetic, as well as some areas for acute disagreement. This article discusses what Preston did write about feminism, and goes on to examine areas of common approach: the hermeneutic of suspicion, social ethics, and a priori commitments. It also, briefly, discusses areas of disagreement: common consensus, universalism, and eschatological realism. It ends with (...)
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  13. Robin James (2011). &Quot;feminist Aesthetics, Popular Music, and the Politics of the 'Mainstream'&Quot;. In L. Ryan Musgrave (ed.), Feminist Aesthetics and Philosophy of Art. Springer.score: 21.0
    While feminist aestheticians have long interrogated gendered, raced, and classed hierarchies in the arts, feminist philosophers still don’t talk much about popular music. Even though Angela Davis and bell hooks have seriously engaged popular music, they are often situated on the margins of philosophy. It is my contention that feminist aesthetics has a lot to offer to the study of popular music, and the case of popular music points feminist aesthetics to some of its own limitations and unasked questions. This (...)
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  14. Seyla Benhabib (ed.) (1995). Feminist Contentions: A Philosophical Exchange. Routledge.score: 21.0
    This unique volume presents a debate between four of the top feminist theorists in the US today, discussing the key questions facing contemporary feminist theory, responding to each other, and distinguishing their views from others.
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  15. Drucilla K. Barker & Edith Kuiper (eds.) (2003). Toward a Feminist Philosophy of Economics. Routledge.score: 21.0
    Feminist economists have demonstrated that interrogating hierarchies based on gender, ethnicity, class and nation results in an economics that is biased and more faithful to empirical evidence than are mainstream accounts. This rigorous and comprehensive book examines many of the central philosophical questions and themes in feminist economics including: · History of economics · Feminist science studies · Identity and agency · Caring labor · Postcolonialism and postmodernism With contributions from such leading figures as Nancy Folbre, Julie Nelson and Sandra (...)
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  16. Carole R. McCann & Seung-Kyung Kim (eds.) (2003). Feminist Theory Reader: Local and Global Perspectives. Routledge.score: 21.0
    The "Feminist Theory Reader" provides a revolutionary new approach to anthologizing the important works in feminist theory by incorporating the voices of women ...
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  17. Sarah Franklin, Celia Lury & Jackie Stacey (eds.) (1991). Off-Centre: Feminism and Cultural Studies. Harpercollins Academic.score: 21.0
    This indispensible collection brings together feminist theory and cultural studies, looking at issues such as pop culture and the media, science and technology, ...
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  18. Christine E. Gudorf (2004). Feminism and Postmodernism in Susan Frank Parsons. [REVIEW] Journal of Religious Ethics 32 (3):519 - 543.score: 21.0
    Reviewing "The Ethics of Gender, Feminism and Christian Ethics," and "The Cambridge Companion to Feminist Theology," the author suggests that Susan Parsons responds to questions postmodernism has posed to both feminism and Christian ethics by using insights gained from various accounts of the moral subject found in feminist philosophy, ethics, and theology. Hesitant to embrace postmodernism's critique of the possibility of ethics, Parsons redefines ethics by establishing a moral point of view within discursive communities. Yet in her brief (...)
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  19. Deidre Nicole Green (2013). Works of Love in a World of Violence: Kierkegaard, Feminism, and the Limits of Self‐Sacrifice. Hypatia 28 (3):568-584.score: 21.0
    Feminist scholars adopt wide-ranging views of self-sacrifice: their critiques claim that women are inordinately affected by Christianity's valorization of self-sacrifice and that this traditional Christian value is inherently misogynistic and necrophilic. Although Søren Kierkegaard's Works of Love deems Christian love essentially sacrificial, love, in his view, sets significant limits on the role of self-sacrifice in human life. Through his proposed response to one who requests forgiveness, “Do you now truly love me?” Kierkegaard offers a model of forgiveness that subverts (...)
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  20. Carolina Teles Lemos (2012). Mística feminista: interfaces entre místicas religiosas e místicas seculares (Feminist mystic: interfaces between religious mystic and secular mystic) - DOI: 10.5752/P.2175-5841.2012v10n27p804. [REVIEW] Horizonte 10 (27):804-830.score: 21.0
    Este artigo trata da presença da mística enquanto elemento presente e dinamizador do movimento feminista. Entende-se a mística como o mistério de preparar-se e jamais se encontrar com a totalidade daquilo que se aspira alcançar. Trata-se do mistério que move e impulsiona o sujeito para viver sua causa e construir sua utopia individual e / ou coletiva. Considera-se a mística feminista em duas dimensões: a religiosa e a secular. Entende-se que, no caso das mulheres, como a história do cristianismo no (...)
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  21. Rosemary Auchmuty (2012). Law and the Power of Feminism: How Marriage Lost its Power to Oppress Women. Feminist Legal Studies 20 (2):71-87.score: 21.0
    In Feminism and the Power of Law Carol Smart argued that feminists should use non-legal strategies rather than looking to law to bring about women’s liberation. This article seeks to demonstrate that, as far as marriage is concerned, she was right. Statistics and contemporary commentary show how marriage, once the ultimate and only acceptable status for women, has declined in social significance to such an extent that today it is a mere lifestyle choice. This is due to many factors, (...)
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  22. Rosemary Hunter (2012). The Power of Feminist Judgments? Feminist Legal Studies 20 (2):135-148.score: 21.0
    Recent years have seen the advent of two feminist judgment-writing projects, the Women’s Court of Canada, and the Feminist Judgments Project in England. This article analyses these projects in light of Carol Smart’s feminist critique of law and legal reform and her proposed feminist strategies in Feminism and the Power of Law (1989). At the same time, it reflects on Smart’s arguments 20 years after their first publication and considers the extent to which feminist judgment-writing projects may reinforce or (...)
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  23. Clare McGlynn (2008). Rape as 'Torture'? Catharine MacKinnon and Questions of Feminist Strategy. Feminist Legal Studies 16 (1):71-85.score: 21.0
    How can we eradicate violence against women? How, at least, can we reduce its prevalence? One possibility offered by Catharine MacKinnon is to harness international human rights norms, especially prohibitions on torture, and apply them to sexual violence with greater rigour and commitment than has hitherto been the case. This article focuses particularly on the argument that all rapes constitute torture in which states are actively complicit. It questions whether a feminist strategy to reconceptualise rape as torture should be pursued, (...)
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  24. Janice Richardson (2007). On Not Making Ourselves the Prey of Others: Jean Hampton's Feminist Contractarianism. [REVIEW] Feminist Legal Studies 15 (1):33-55.score: 21.0
    This article assesses Jean Hampton’s feminist contractarianism by considering the way in which she draws together the contradictory positions of Hobbes and Kant to produce a test for exploitation in personal relationships. The ways in which this work fits with her other analysis of retribution, gratitude and self-worth are examined. Hampton’s work is evaluated in the context of Carole Pateman’s argument that moral theories distract from the political analysis of who has a voice in relationships. Hampton’s work presumes the social (...)
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  25. Linda Alcoff & Elizabeth Potter (eds.) (1993). Feminist Epistemologies. Routledge.score: 21.0
    This is the first collection by influential feminist theorists to focus on the heart of traditional epistemology, dealing with such issues as the nature of knowledge and objectivity from a gender perspective.
     
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  26. Beverley Baines (2009). Contextualism, Feminism, and a Canadian Woman Judge. Feminist Legal Studies 17 (1):27-42.score: 21.0
    Feminist legal scholars have never cut the first woman appointed to the Supreme Court of Canada as much slack as the second. Yet the first, Justice Bertha Wilson, introduced the contextual method into the Court’s jurisprudence. Her approach to contextualism is consistent with one of three feminist legal methods that Katharine T. Bartlett identifies. More specifically, it is consistent with Bartlett’s feminist practical reasoning. However, Justice Wilson’s contextualism is not without its critics. The most challenging, Ruth Colker, contends it must (...)
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  27. Michèle Barrett & Anne Phillips (eds.) (1992). Destabilizing Theory: Contemporary Feminist Debates. Stanford University Press.score: 21.0
    In the past decade the central principles of western feminist theory have been dramatically challenged. many feminists have endorsed post-structuralism's rejection of essentialist theoretical categories, and have added a powerful gender dimension to contemporary critiques of modernity. Earlier 'women' have been radically undermined, and newer concerns with 'difference', 'identity', and 'power' have emerged. Destabilizing Theory explores these developments in a set of specially commissioned essays by feminist theorists. Does this change amount to a real shift within feminist theory, or will (...)
     
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  28. Alice Belcher (2000). A Feminist Perspective on Contract Theories From Law and Economics. Feminist Legal Studies 8 (1):29-46.score: 21.0
    This article offers a feminist perspective on contract theories in law,economics and law-and-economics. It identifies masculine traits presentcontract theories in all three disciplines. It then describes andassesses some developments that appear to be ‘feminising’: Therecognition of the importance of social norms in contract theory andtheories of contract as relationship. The article's main claim is that amasculine model of decision-making persists even within the less overtlymasculine models of contract. The problem of sexually transmitted debtresulting from a surety contract is analysed in (...)
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  29. Anne Bottomley (2004). Shock to Thought: An Encounter (of a Third Kind) with Legal Feminism. [REVIEW] Feminist Legal Studies 12 (1):29-65.score: 21.0
    This paper takes a recently published text and, in examining it closely, argues that it exemplifies trends within feminist scholarship in law, which might be characterised asestablishing a form of orthodoxy. The paper explores some of the ways in which thiso rthodoxy is constructed and presented, and argues that it is characterised by a commitment both to `grand theory' and Hegelian dialectics. The adoption of this model of work seems to offer a chance to hold together the triangular figure of (...)
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  30. Nancy Daukas (2011). Altogether Now: A Virtue-Theoretic Approach to Pluralism in Feminist Epistemology In. In Heidi Grasswick (ed.), Feminist Epistemology and Philosophy of Science: Power in Knowledge.score: 21.0
    In this paper I develop and support a feminist virtue epistemology and bring it into conversation with feminist contextual empiricism and feminist standpoint theory. The virtue theory I develop is centered on the virtue of epistemic trustworthiness, which foregrounds the social/political character of knowledge practices and products, and the differences between epistemic agencies that perpetuate, on the one hand, and displace, on the other hand, normative patterns of unjust epistemic discrimination. I argue that my view answers important questions regarding epistemic (...)
     
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  31. Maria Diaconescu (2010). Contribuţii şi limite ale feminismului în asistenţa sociala/ Contributions and Limits of Feminism in Social Work. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 5 (14):112-119.score: 21.0
    Today, the feminist ideologies and practices, the philosophies in action and the academic gender studies are all forms of the emancipation of women. All these are intimately related by the feminization and professionalization of social work. The common view identifies social work with those who deal with adoptions, philantropy and Christian charity, and more recently with the dehumanizing beaurocracy of the local offices for social protection. Yet, a great proportion of those who deal with all these things are women. In (...)
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  32. Maria Drakopoulou (2000). The Ethic of Care, Female Subjectivity and Feminist Legal Scholarship. Feminist Legal Studies 8 (2):199-226.score: 21.0
    The object of this essay is to explore the central role played by the ‘ethic of care’ in debates within and beyond feminist legal theory. The author claims that the ethic of care has attracted feminist legal scholars in particular, as a means of resolving the theoretical, political and strategic difficulties to which the perceived ‘crisis of subjectivity’ in feminist theory has given rise. She argues that feminist legal scholars are peculiarly placed in relation to this crisis because of their (...)
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  33. Eileen V. Fegan (1999). `Subjects' of Regulation/Resistance? Postmodern Feminism and Agency in Abortion-Decision-Making. Feminist Legal Studies 7 (3):241-273.score: 21.0
    This article explores the epistemological and strategic issues facing feminists embarking upon narrative explorations into women's experiences. It considers the implications for feminist epistemology of acknowledging women's participation in dominant ideologies about their social role. Focusing upon questions of women's agency, it asks how this `conforming knowledge' might complicate postmodernist feminist notions of resisting and reconstructing law's categorisation of `Woman'. It also represents an attempt to clarify, in advance of my own analysis of women's agency in abortion decision-making, why postmodern (...)
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  34. Aisha K. Gill (2013). Feminist Reflections on Researching So-Called 'Honour' Killings. Feminist Legal Studies 21 (3):241-261.score: 21.0
    Drawing on 2 years of field research conducted between 2008 and 2010 in London’s Kurdish community, I discuss the practical and ethical challenges that confront researchers dealing with violence against women committed in the name of ‘honour’. In examining how feminist methodologies and principles inform my research, I address issues of researcher positioning and the importance of speaking with, rather than for, marginalised groups. I then explore the difficulties of operationalising this position when dealing with honour-based violence. Using the interview (...)
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  35. Ratna Kapur (2012). Pink Chaddis and SlutWalk Couture: The Postcolonial Politics of Feminism Lite. [REVIEW] Feminist Legal Studies 20 (1):1-20.score: 21.0
    The SlutWalk campaigns around the world have triggered a furious debate on whether they advance or limit feminist legal politics. This article examines the location of campaigns such as the SlutWalk marches in the context of feminist legal advocacy in postcolonial India, and discusses whether their emergence signifies the demise of feminism or its incarnation in a different guise. The author argues that the SlutWalks, much like the Pink Chaddi (panty) campaign in India, provide an important normative and discursive (...)
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  36. Wendy Larcombe (2011). Falling Rape Conviction Rates: (Some) Feminist Aims and Measures for Rape Law. [REVIEW] Feminist Legal Studies 19 (1):27-45.score: 21.0
    Rape conviction rates have fallen to all-time lows in recent years, prompting governments to explore a range of strategies to improve them. This paper argues that, while the current legal impunity for rape cannot be condoned, increasing conviction rates is not in itself a valid objective of law reform. The paper problematises the measure of rape law that conviction rates provide by developing an account of (some) feminist aims for rape law reform. Three feminist aims and associated measures are explained—all (...)
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  37. Jill Marshall (2006). Feminist Jurisprudence: Keeping the Subject Alive. Feminist Legal Studies 14 (1):27-51.score: 21.0
    One of the main purposes of feminist jurisprudence is to create or find better ways of being and living for women through the analysis, critique, and use of law. Rich work has emerged, and continues to emerge, from feminist theorists exploring conceptions of the self, personhood, identity and subjectivity that could be used to form a basic unit in law and politics. In this article, it is argued that a strong sense of human subjectivity needs to be retained to enable (...)
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  38. Linda McDowell & Joanne P. Sharp (eds.) (1997). Space, Gender, Knowledge: Feminist Readings. J. Wiley.score: 21.0
    Space Gender Knowledge is an innovative and comprehensive introduction to the geographies of gender and the gendered nature of spatial relations. It examines the major issues raised by women's movements and academic feminism, and outlines the main shifts in feminist geographical work, from the geography of women to the impact of post-structuralism. In making their selection, the editors have drawn on a wide range of interdisciplinary material, ranging across spatial scales from the body to the globe. The book presents (...)
     
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  39. Thérèse Murphy & Noel Whitty (2006). The Question of Evil and Feminist Legal Scholarship. Feminist Legal Studies 14 (1):1-26.score: 21.0
    In this article, we argue that feminist legal scholars should engage directly and explicitly with the question of evil. Part I summarises key facts surrounding the prosecution and life-long imprisonment of Myra Hindley, one of a tiny number of women involved in multiple killings of children in recent British history. Part II reviews a range of commentaries on Hindley, noting in particular the repeated use of two narratives: the first of these insists that Hindley is an icon of female evil; (...)
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  40. Linda J. Nicholson (ed.) (1997). The Second Wave: A Reader in Feminist Theory. Routledge.score: 21.0
    This volume collects many of the major essays of feminist theory of the past forty years. The essays included here are those which have made key contributions to feminist theory during this period and which have generated extensive discussion. The volume organizes these essays historically, so as to provide a sense of the major turning points in feminist theory. Beginning with those essays which have provoked widespread discussion in the early days of the second wave, the volume then presents essays (...)
     
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  41. Anne E. Patrick (1996). Liberating Conscience: Feminist Explorations in Catholic Moral Theology. Continuum.score: 21.0
     
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  42. Helen Reece (2011). “Unpalatable Messages”? Feminist Analysis of United Kingdom Legislative Discourse on Stalking 1996–1997. Feminist Legal Studies 19 (3):205-230.score: 21.0
    North American scholarship has charted resonances between 1990s legislative and feminist discourse concerning violence against women. Feminist critique of official discourse surrounding the Protection from Harassment Act 1997 suggests that 1990s resonances did not reach the UK: however, an examination of the Hansard debates suggests this under-estimates the influence of feminist discourse. Halley’s discussion of “bad faith” helps to explain both the tendency of feminists to under-estimate their influence and why this matters. A commitment to an understanding of themselves as (...)
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  43. Harriet Samuels (2004). A Defining Moment: A Feminist Perspective On The Law of Sexual Harassment in the Workplace in the Light of the Equal Treatment Amendment Directive. [REVIEW] Feminist Legal Studies 12 (2):181-211.score: 21.0
    This article considers, from a feminist perspective, the introduction of the European Equal Treatment Amendment Directive (E.T.A.D.) and its impact on the law of sexual harassment in the United Kingdom. Since feminists identified sexual harassment as a problem for women in the 1970s, feminist legal scholars have focused their attention on the law as a means of redressing it. Bringing claims in the U.K. has been difficult because of the absence of a definition of sexual harassment and reliance in the (...)
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  44. Harriet Samuels (2013). Feminizing Human Rights Adjudication: Feminist Method and the Proportionality Principle. [REVIEW] Feminist Legal Studies 21 (1):39-60.score: 21.0
    Proportionality is one of the most important adjudicatory tools, in human rights decision-making, primarily employed to balance rights and interests. Despite this there is very little feminist analysis of its use by the courts. This article discusses the doctrine of proportionality and considers its amenability to feminist legal methods. It relies on theories of deliberative democracy to argue that the proportionality test can be applied in a manner that facilitates a more “interactive universalism”, allows for greater participation in decision-making and (...)
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  45. Lisa Tessman (2009). Feminist Eudaimonism: Eudaimonism as Non-Ideal Theory. In , Feminist Ethics and Social and Political Philosophy: Theorizing the Non-Ideal. Springer. 47--58.score: 21.0
    This paper considers whether eudaimonism is necessarily an idealizing approach to ethics. I argue, contrary to what is implied by Christine Swanton, that it is not, and I suggest that a non-ideal eudaimonistic virtue ethics can be useful for feminist and critical race theorists. For eudaimonist theorists in the Aristotelian tradition, the claim that one should aim to live virtuously assumes that there will typically be good enough background conditions so that an exercise of the virtues, in conjunction with these (...)
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  46. Claire Young & Susan Boyd (2006). Losing the Feminist Voice? Debates on The Legal Recognition of Same Sex Partnerships in Canada. Feminist Legal Studies 14 (2):213-240.score: 21.0
    Over the last decade, legal recognition of same-sex relationships in Canada has accelerated. By and large, same-sex cohabitants are now recognised in the same manner as opposite-sex cohabitants, and same-sex marriage was legalised in 2005. Without diminishing the struggle that lesbians and gay men have endured to secure this somewhat revolutionary legal recognition, this article troubles its narrative of progress. In particular, we investigate the terms on which recent legal struggles have advanced, as well as the ways in which resistance (...)
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  47. Sharon Crasnow (2008). Feminist Philosophy of Science: 'Standpoint' and Knowledge. [REVIEW] Science and Education 17 (10):1089-1110.score: 18.0
    Feminist philosophy of science has been criticized on several counts. On the one hand, it is claimed that it results in relativism of the worst sort since the political commitment to feminism is prima facie incompatible with scientific objectivity. On the other hand, when critics acknowledge that there may be some value in work that feminists have done, they comment that there is nothing particularly feminist about their accounts. I argue that both criticisms can be addressed through a better (...)
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  48. Samantha Brennan (2009). Feminist Ethics and Everyday Inequalities. Hypatia 24 (141):159.score: 18.0
    How should feminist philosophers regard the inequalities that structure the lives of women? Some of these inequalities are trivial and others are not; together they form a framework of unequal treatment that shapes women’s lives. This paper asks what priority we should give inequalities that affect women; it critically analyzes Claudia Card’s view that feminists ought to give evils priority. Sometimes ending gender-based inequalities is the best route to eliminating gender-based evil.
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  49. Laurie Shrage (1994). Moral Dilemmas of Feminism: Prostitution, Adultery, and Abortion. Routledge.score: 18.0
    Sharge explores the moral pemises of feminist sexual politics, focusing in particular on the emotive issues of abortion, prostitution and adultery, in order to develop an interpretative and pluralist approach to feminist ethics.
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  50. Emily S. Lee (2008). Book Review of Dorothea Olkowski and Gail Weiss’s Feminist Interpretations of Maurice Merleau-Ponty. [REVIEW] American Philosophical Association Newsletter on Feminism and Philosophy 7 (2):24--26.score: 18.0
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