Search results for 'Feminism Christianity' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Black Feminism (1995). A Black Feminist Statement. In Beverly Guy-Sheftal (ed.), Words of Fire: An Anthology of African American Feminist Thought. The New Press.score: 100.0
  2. Jonathan K. Crane (2011). PERSPECTIVES ON TORTURE: Reports From a Dialogue Including Christian, Judaic, Islamic, and Feminist Viewpoints. Journal of Religious Ethics 39 (4):585-588.score: 96.0
    Torture continues to be a pressing political issue in North America, yet religious scholarly reflection on the ethics of torture remains all but sidelined in public discourse for a variety of complex reasons. These reasons are explored—and critiqued—in this collection of reflections by Christian, Jewish, Muslim, and feminist religious ethicists. These scholars find that historical amnesia, forced if not twisted readings of classical texts and contemporary human rights instruments, and sociological factors are but a few of the factors challenging contemporary (...)
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  3. Catharina J. M. Halkes (1991). New Creation: Christian Feminism and the Renewal of the Earth. Westminster/John Knox Press.score: 96.0
    A bold and visionary book that reveals the false and catastrophically damaging images at the root of the oppression of women and the rape of Earth's resources, ...
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  4. Margaret Daphne Hampson (1996). After Christianity. Trinity Press International.score: 78.0
     
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  5. Jay B. McDaniel (1987). Self-Affirmation and Ego Transcendence: The Encounter of Christianity with Feminism and Buddhism. Buddhist-Christian Studies 7:215-232.score: 74.0
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  6. Irene Oh (2010). Motherhood in Christianity and Islam: Critiques, Realities, and Possibilities. Journal of Religious Ethics 38 (4):638-653.score: 72.0
    Common experiences of mothering offer profound critiques of maternal ethical norms found in both Christianity and Islam. The familiar responsibilities of caring for children, assumed by the majority of Christian and Muslim women, provide the basis for reassessing sacrificial and selfless love, protesting unjust religious and political systems, and dismantling romanticized notions of childcare. As a distinctive category of women's experience, motherhood may offer valuable perspectives necessary for remedying injustices that afflict mothers and children in particular, as well as (...)
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  7. Christina Van Dyke (2008). Eating as a Gendered Act: Christianity, Feminism, and Reclaiming the Body. In K. J. Clark (ed.) Readings in the Philosophy of Religion, 2nd Edition (Peterborough: Broadview Press, 2008). 475-489.score: 72.0
  8. Richard H. Bell (1989). Ann Loades, Searching for Lost Coins: Explorations in Christianity and Feminism Pp. 118. (London: SPCK, 1987). Religious Studies 25 (4):538.score: 72.0
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  9. Susan Frank Parsons (1996). Feminism and Christian Ethics. Cambridge University Press.score: 60.0
    Feminists are aware of the diversity of thinking within their own tradition, and of the different approaches to moral questions in which that is manifest. This book describes and analyses that diversity by distinguishing three distinct paradigms of moral reasoning to be found within feminism. Using the writings of feminists, the major strengths and weaknesses of each theory are considered, so that creative dialogue between them can be encouraged. Three common themes are drawn out - which are also on (...)
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  10. Sólveig Anna Bóasdóttir (1998). Violence, Power, and Justice: A Feminist Contribution to Christian Sexual Ethics. Academia Upsaliensis.score: 50.0
  11. Melissa Raphael (2014). A Patrimony of Idols: Second-Wave Jewish and Christian Feminist Theology and the Criticism of Religion. Sophia 53 (2):241-259.score: 48.0
    This article suggests that second-wave feminist theology between around 1968 and 1995 undertook the quintessentially religious and task of theology, which is to break its own idols. Idoloclasm was the dynamic of Jewish and Christian feminist theological reformism and the means by which to clear a way back into its own tradition. Idoloclasm brought together an inter-religious coalition of feminists who believed that idolatry is not one of the pitfalls of patriarchy but its symptom and cause, not a subspecies of (...)
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  12. Richard Grigg (1995). When God Becomes Goddess: The Transformation of American Religion. Continuum.score: 48.0
     
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  13. Deidre Nicole Green (2013). Works of Love in a World of Violence: Kierkegaard, Feminism, and the Limits of Self‐Sacrifice. Hypatia 28 (3):568-584.score: 42.0
    Feminist scholars adopt wide-ranging views of self-sacrifice: their critiques claim that women are inordinately affected by Christianity's valorization of self-sacrifice and that this traditional Christian value is inherently misogynistic and necrophilic. Although Søren Kierkegaard's Works of Love deems Christian love essentially sacrificial, love, in his view, sets significant limits on the role of self-sacrifice in human life. Through his proposed response to one who requests forgiveness, “Do you now truly love me?” Kierkegaard offers a model of forgiveness that subverts (...)
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  14. Carolina Teles Lemos (2012). Mística feminista: interfaces entre místicas religiosas e místicas seculares (Feminist mystic: interfaces between religious mystic and secular mystic) - DOI: 10.5752/P.2175-5841.2012v10n27p804. [REVIEW] Horizonte 10 (27):804-830.score: 42.0
    Este artigo trata da presença da mística enquanto elemento presente e dinamizador do movimento feminista. Entende-se a mística como o mistério de preparar-se e jamais se encontrar com a totalidade daquilo que se aspira alcançar. Trata-se do mistério que move e impulsiona o sujeito para viver sua causa e construir sua utopia individual e / ou coletiva. Considera-se a mística feminista em duas dimensões: a religiosa e a secular. Entende-se que, no caso das mulheres, como a história do cristianismo no (...)
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  15. H. Stanton (2004). A Certain Creative Recklessness: Ronald Preston and Christian Feminist Ethics. Studies in Christian Ethics 17 (2):140-147.score: 36.0
    Ronald Preston wrote little of feminism, and feminism appears to have ignored Preston. There is much, however, in Preston's work which feminists would have found sympathetic, as well as some areas for acute disagreement. This article discusses what Preston did write about feminism, and goes on to examine areas of common approach: the hermeneutic of suspicion, social ethics, and a priori commitments. It also, briefly, discusses areas of disagreement: common consensus, universalism, and eschatological realism. It ends with (...)
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  16. Colin Grant (2001). Altruism and Christian Ethics. Cambridge University Press.score: 34.0
    Separated from its anchorage in religion, ethics has followed the social sciences in seeing human beings as fundamentally characterized by self-interest, so that altruism is either naively idealistic or arrogantly self-sufficient. Colin Grant contends that, as a modern secular concept, altruism is a parody on the self-giving love of Christianity, so that its dismissal represents a social levelling that loses the depths that theology makes intelligible and religion makes possible. The Christian affirmation is that God is characterized (...)
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  17. Maria Lastochkina (2013). Remedying Sexual Asymmetry with Christian Feminism: Some Orthodox Christian Reflections in Response to Erika Bachiochi, “Women, Sexual Asymmetry & Catholic Teaching”. Christian Bioethics 19 (2):172-184.score: 34.0
    Abortion has become such an indispensable part of contemporary experience that even Christians sometimes find it difficult to oppose. Since taking the life in utero has ceased to be regarded as a grave sin and is not always recognized as an unmitigated evil, those who wish to remain faithful to the Word of God struggle to find ways of speaking against killing of the unborn. Some of them, like Erika Bachiochi, seek to beat modern culture at its own game, by (...)
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  18. Harriet Baber, Feminism and Christian Ethics1 21.score: 32.0
    Currently a number of feminists in philosophy and religious studies as well as other academic disciplines have argued that policies, practices and doctrines assumed to be sexneutral are in fact male-biased. Thus, Rosemary Reuther, reflecting on the development of theology in the Judeo-Christian tradition suggests that the long-term exclusion of women from leadership and theological education has rendered the “official theological culture” repressive to women and dismissive of women’s experience: “To begin to take women seriously,” she notes, “will involve a (...)
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  19. Nancy J. Duff (1999). Atonement and the Christian Life Reformed Doctrine From a Feminist Perspective. Interpretation 53 (1):21-33.score: 32.0
    Once the prophetic office of Christ is understood as the apocalypse of God's act of reconciliation, employing the threefold office to interpret the atonement preserves the tenets of classical Christian dogma while addressing important issues raised by feminist and womanist theologians.
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  20. Anne E. Patrick (1996). Liberating Conscience: Feminist Explorations in Catholic Moral Theology. Continuum.score: 32.0
     
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  21. Christine E. Gudorf (2004). Feminism and Postmodernism in Susan Frank Parsons. [REVIEW] Journal of Religious Ethics 32 (3):519 - 543.score: 30.0
    Reviewing "The Ethics of Gender, Feminism and Christian Ethics," and "The Cambridge Companion to Feminist Theology," the author suggests that Susan Parsons responds to questions postmodernism has posed to both feminism and Christian ethics by using insights gained from various accounts of the moral subject found in feminist philosophy, ethics, and theology. Hesitant to embrace postmodernism's critique of the possibility of ethics, Parsons redefines ethics by establishing a moral point of view within discursive communities. Yet in her brief (...)
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  22. Patricia Altenbernd Johnson (1992). Feminist Christian Philosophy? Faith and Philosophy 9 (3):320-334.score: 30.0
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  23. Irene S. Switankowsky (2011). Feminist Christian Encounters: The Methods and Strategies of Feminist Informed Christian Theologies. By Angela Pears, On The Cutting Edge: The Study of Women in Biblical Worlds: Essays in Honor of Elisabeth Schüssler Fiorenza. Edited by Jane Schaberg, Alice Bach, and Esther Fuchs and Writing Catholic Women: Contemporary International Catholic Girlhood Narratives. By Jeana DelRosso. [REVIEW] Heythrop Journal 52 (5):881-882.score: 30.0
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  24. Maria Diaconescu (2010). Contribuţii şi limite ale feminismului în asistenţa sociala/ Contributions and Limits of Feminism in Social Work. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 5 (14):112-119.score: 30.0
    Today, the feminist ideologies and practices, the philosophies in action and the academic gender studies are all forms of the emancipation of women. All these are intimately related by the feminization and professionalization of social work. The common view identifies social work with those who deal with adoptions, philantropy and Christian charity, and more recently with the dehumanizing beaurocracy of the local offices for social protection. Yet, a great proportion of those who deal with all these things are women. In (...)
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  25. Ursule Molinaro (1989). A Christian Martyr in Reverse Hypatia: 370 - 415 A. D.: A Vivid Portrait of the Life and Death of Hypatia as Seen Through the Eyes of a Feminist Poet and Novelist. [REVIEW] Hypatia 4 (1):6 - 8.score: 26.0
    The torture killing of the noted philosopher Hypatia by a mob of Christians in Alexandria in 415 AD marks the end of a time when women were still appreciated for the brain under their hair.
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  26. J. Shaw (1997). Book Reviews : Feminism and Christian Ethics, by Susan Frank Parsons. Cambridge University Press, 1996. 279 Pp. Pb. 11.95. Hb. 35.00. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 10 (2):116-119.score: 26.0
  27. Miriam Levering (2003). Religious Feminism and the Future of the Planet: A Buddhist-Christian Conversation (Review). Buddhist-Christian Studies 23 (1):157-158.score: 26.0
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  28. Davina Cooper & Didi Herman (2013). Up Against the Property Logic of Equality Law: Conservative Christian Accommodation Claims and Gay Rights. [REVIEW] Feminist Legal Studies 21 (1):61-80.score: 26.0
    This paper explores conservative Christian demands that religious-based objections to providing services to lesbians and gay men should be accommodated by employers and public bodies. Focusing on a series of court judgments, alongside commentators’ critical accounts, the paper explores the dominant interpretation of the conflict as one involving two groups with deeply held, competing interests, and suggests this interpretation can be understood through a social property framework. The paper explores how religious beliefs and sexual orientation are attachments whose power has (...)
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  29. Sarah Katherine Pinnock (2003). Religious Feminism and the Future of the Planet: A Buddhist-Christian Conversation (Review). Buddhist-Christian Studies 23 (1):155-157.score: 26.0
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  30. William A. Galston & Peter H. Hoffenberg (eds.) (2010). Poverty and Morality: Religious and Secular Perspectives. Cambridge University Press.score: 24.0
    Machine generated contents note: 1. Introduction William A. Galston and Peter H. Hoffenberg; 2. Global poverty and uneven development Sakiko Fukuda-Parr; 3. The karma of poverty: a Buddhist perspective David R. Loy; 4. Poverty and morality in Christianity Kent A. Van Til; 5. Classical liberalism, poverty, and morality Tom G. Palmer; 6. Confucian perspectives on poverty and morality Peter Nosco; 7. Poverty and morality: a feminist perspective Nancy J. Hirschmann; 8. Hinduism and poverty Arvind Sharma; 9. The problem of (...)
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  31. Sohail H. Hashmi & Steven Lee (eds.) (2004). Ethics and Weapons of Mass Destruction: Religious and Secular Perspectives. Cambridge University Press.score: 24.0
    This volume offers a unique perspective on the discussion of weapons of mass destruction (WMD) by broadening the terms of the debate to include secular as well as religious investigations not normally considered. Its contributed essays feature a structured dialogue between representatives of the following ethical traditions-- Buddhism, Christianity, Confucianism, feminism, Hinduism, Islam, Judaism, liberalism, natural law, pacifism, and realism--who address identical moral issues in order to create a dialogue both within and across traditions.
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  32. James T. Bretzke (2001). Bibliography on East Asian Religion and Philosophy. E. Mellen Press.score: 24.0
    Machine generated contents note: INTRODUCTION 1 -- Focus of the Sections and Sub-sections 1 -- East Asian Internet Resources 1 -- A Note on Using the Index 2 -- GENERAL WORKS ON PHILOSOPHY& RELIGION IN ASIA 5 -- BUDDHISM 37 -- Primary Sources 37 -- Buddhist Ethics 38 -- Buddhism and Judeo-Christianity 52 -- Zen Buddhism 69 -- Other Works on Buddhism 76 -- CONFUCIANISM 95 -- Chinese and Confucian Classics 95 -- Translations of the Four Books 95 -- (...)
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  33. Kevin Schilbrack (ed.) (2004). Thinking Through Rituals: Philosophical Perspectives. Routledge.score: 24.0
    Existentialism claims that there is no human reality except in action: pragmatism argues that meaning and truth are given only in practice. Wittgenstein calls for attention to forms of life, Marxism calls for attention to doing, and feminism calls for attention to the body. What do these tell us about ritual acts and their connection to spirit and to truth in Christianity and other world religions? Religious rituals have a special status as virtually pure forms of belief in (...)
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  34. Nannerl O. Keohane (1982). Feminist Scholarship and Human Nature:Woman and Nature. Susan Griffin; Women in Western Political Thought. Susan Moller Okin; Women of Spirit: Female Leadership in the Jewish and Christian Traditions. Rosemary Ruether, Eleanor McLaughlin; The Nature of Woman: An Encyclopedia and Guide to the Literature. Mary Anne Warren; Equality and the Rights of Women. Elizabeth H. Wolgast. [REVIEW] Ethics 93 (1):102-.score: 24.0
  35. Xiao Wei (2007). Caring: Confucianism, Feminism, and Christian Ethics. Contemporary Chinese Thought 39 (2):32-48.score: 24.0
  36. Dana Freibach-Heifetz & Gila Stopler (2008). On Conceptual Dichotomies and Social Oppression. Philosophy and Social Criticism 34 (5):515-535.score: 24.0
    Ramat Gan Academic Center of Law and Business, Israel This article aims to expose the philosophical and cultural mechanisms, which allow some forms of western religion (in this case mainstream Christianity) to join hands with western capitalism in the oppression of women and of the needy. Focusing on the example of the USA, this article claims that both mainstream Christian religion and capitalism perpetuate and entrench discrimination against women and the oppression of the needy through the use of the (...)
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  37. Jean-Yves Lacoste (1986). Elisabeth Schüssler Fiorenza, In Memory of Her. A Feminist Theological Reconstruction of Christian Origins. Revue Philosophique de Louvain 84 (62):275-277.score: 24.0
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  38. Jaci de Fátima Souza Candiotto (2012). A Teologia Ecofeminista E Sua Perspectiva Simbólico/Cultural (Ecofeminist Theology and its Symbolic/Cultural Perspective)-DOI: 10.5752/P. 2175-5841.2012 V10n28p1395. [REVIEW] Horizonte 10 (28):1395-1413.score: 24.0
    Resumo O artigo analisa a pertinência da mediação do ecofeminismo simbólico/cultural para a teologia feminista, especialmente no contexto da América Latina. Argumenta-se que o ecofeminismo teológico não pode ser compreendido de modo homogêneo. Pelo menos dois desdobramentos podem ser identificados na sua constituição: essencialista e construcionista. A conclusão é que ambos proporcionam contribuições significativas para a teologia feminista, porém correm o risco de se afastar do cristianismo e pulverizar as lutas emancipatórias das mulheres. Palavras-chave : Teologia ecofeminista; Igreja; Gênero; Mulheres; (...)
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  39. Adam G. Cooper (2008). Life in the Flesh: An Anti-Gnostic Spiritual Philosophy. OUP Oxford.score: 24.0
    Christianity is deeply interested in the body. In its central mysteries - creation, incarnation, and resurrection - the body and human flesh are radically implicated. Bodies are persons, and persons are spiritual beings, bearers of the divine image and destined for bodily union with God. From the Bible to the Second Vatican Council, from Irenaeus and Tertullian to Aquinas and Luther, the classic sources of the Christian tradition engender a spiritual philosophy that challenges the ever-present gnostic impulse either to (...)
     
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  40. Jane Duran (2000). Mary Astell: A Pre-Humean Christian Empiricist and Feminist. In Cecile T. Tougas & Sara Ebenreck (eds.), Presenting Women Philosophers. Temple University Press.score: 24.0
     
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  41. Elizabeth A. Johnson (2007/2011). Quest for the Living God: Mapping Frontiers in the Theology of God. Continuum.score: 24.0
    'Since the middle of the twentieth century,' writes Elizabeth Johnson, 'there has been a renaissance of new insights into God in the Christian tradition. On different continents, under pressure from historical events and social conditions, people of faith have glimpsed the living God in fresh ways. It is not that a wholly different God is discovered from the One believed in by previous generations. Christian faith does not believe in a new God but, finding itself in new situations, seeks the (...)
     
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  42. Ursula King (1984). Rosemary Radford Ruether. Sexism and God–Talk. Towards a Feminist Theology Pp. 291 +Xii (London: SCM Press 1983.) £7.95 Pb.Elisabeth Schüssler Fiorenza. In Memory of Her. A Feminist Theological Reconstruction of Christian Origins. Pp. 357 + Xxv (London: SCM Press 1983.) £8.50 Pb. [REVIEW] Religious Studies 20 (4):699-702.score: 24.0
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  43. Marilyn J. Legge (1992). The Grace of Difference: A Canadian Feminist Theological Ethic. OUP USA.score: 24.0
    Marion J. Legge addresses theological ethics from the context of Canadian women -- especially the experience of marginalized women in Canada. Beginning with a critical reassessment of Canadian Radical Christianity, she argues that approches that center on question of economic justice have nevertheless overlooked the day-to-day economic realities of Canadian women. Legge develops a reformulated critical theory of culture that, though it emphasizes difference, avoids premature abstraction and misplaced generalizations. She seeks a voice to articulate the theological and ethical (...)
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  44. Jacqueline Mariña (ed.) (2005). The Cambridge Companion to Friedrich Schleiermacher. Cambridge University Press.score: 24.0
    Known as the 'Father of modern theology' Friedrich Schleiermacher is without a doubt one of the most important theologians in the history of Christianity. Not only relevant to theology, he also made significant contributions in areas of philosophy such as hermeneutics, ethics, philosophy of religion, and the study of Plato, and he was ahead of his time in espousing a kind of pro to-feminism. Divided into three parts, this Companion deals first with elements of Schleiermacher's philosophy, such as (...)
     
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  45. Joy Ann Mcdougall (2008). Keeping Feminist Faith with Christian Traditions: A Look at Christian Feminist Theology Today. Modern Theology 24 (1):103-124.score: 24.0
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  46. J. O. Y. Mcdougall (2008). Keeping Feminist Faith with Christian Traditions: A Look at Christian Feminist Theology Today. Modern Theology 24 (1):103-124.score: 24.0
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  47. Robert C. Solomon (1996). A Short History of Philosophy. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    In this accessible and comprehensive work, Robert Solomon and Kathleen Higgins cover the entire history of philosophy--ancient, medieval, and modern, from cultures both East and West--in its broader historical and cultural contexts. Major philosophers and movements are discussed along with less well-known but interesting figures. The authors examine the early Greek, Indic, and Chinese philosophers and the mythological traditions that preceded them, as well as the great religious philosophies, including Christianity, Hinduism, Judaism, and Taoism. Easily understandable to students without (...)
     
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  48. Gail P. C. Streete (forthcoming). Book Review: Introducing Redemption In Christian Feminism. [REVIEW] Interpretation 54 (1):102-104.score: 24.0
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  49. Ann Mongoven (2003). Sharing Our Body and Blood: Organ Donation and Feminist Critiques of Sacrifice. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 28 (1):89 – 114.score: 22.0
    Feminist analysis of cultural mythology surrounding organ donation offers a critical perspective on current U.S. transplant policy. My argument is three-pronged. First, I argue that organ donation is appropriately understood as a sacrifice. Structurally, donation accords both to general and to specifically Christian archetypes of sacrifice. The characterization of donation as sacrifice resonates in the cultural psyche even though it is absent in public rhetoric. Second, I characterize widespread feminist concerns about the over-glorification of sacrifice. These concerns provide a helpful (...)
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  50. Dorothy G. Rogers (2004). Before "Care": Marietta Kies, Lucia Ames Mead, and Feminist Political Theory. Hypatia 19 (2):105-117.score: 22.0
    : Marietta Kies and Lucia Ames Mead were two late nineteenth-century thinkers who anticipated the late twentieth-century feminist "ethic of care." Kies drew on Hegel's philosophy to develop a political theory of altruism. Ames Mead adopted Kant's theory of peace and established a pacifist theory based on international cooperation. Both Kies and Mead insisted that the prototypically "feminine" ideals they espoused are rational, not emotional, responses to modern political life, and are essential to good political practice. Kies was a member (...)
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