Search results for 'Feminism History' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Helene Bowen Raddeker (2007). Sceptical History: Feminist and Postmodern Approaches in Practice. Routledge.score: 198.0
    A highly original work in history and theory, this survey considers major themes including identity, class and sexual difference, weaves them into debates on the nature and point of history, and arrives at new ways of doing history that – very unusually – consider non-Western history and feminist approaches. Using wide range of historical and cultural contexts, the study draws extensively on feminist scholarship, both feminist history and postcolonial feminism.
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  2. Lilli Alanen & Charlotte Witt (eds.) (2004). Feminist Reflections on the History of Philosophy. Kluwer Academic Publishers.score: 192.0
    Feminist work in the history of philosophy has come of age as an innovative field in the history of philosophy. This volume marks that accomplishment with original essays by leading feminist scholars who ask basic questions: What is distinctive of feminist work in the history of philosophy? Is there a method that is distinctive of feminist historical work? How can women philosophers be meaningfully included in the history of the discipline? Who counts as a philosopher? This (...)
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  3. Genevieve Lloyd (ed.) (2002). Feminism and History of Philosophy. Oxford University Press.score: 192.0
    This new collection of essays by leading feminist critics highlights the fresh perspectives that feminism can offer to the discussion of past philosophers. Rather than defining itself through opposition to a "male" philosophical tradition, feminist philosophy emerges not only as an exciting new contribution to the history of philosophy, but also as a source of cultural self-understanding in the present.
     
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  4. Londa L. Schiebinger (2004). Feminist History of Colonial Science. Hypatia 19 (1):233-254.score: 180.0
    : This essay offers a short overview of feminist history of science and introduces a new project into that history, namely feminist history of colonial science. My case study focuses on eighteenth-century voyages of scientific discovery and reveals how gender relations in Europe and the colonies honed selective collecting practices. Cultural, economic, and political trends discouraged the transfer from the New World to the Old of abortifacients (widely used by Amerindian and African women in the West Indies).1.
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  5. Charlotte Witt, Feminist History of Philosophy. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 174.0
    The past twenty five years have seen an explosion of feminist writing on the philosophical canon, a development that has clear parallels in other disciplines like literature and art history. Since most of the writing is, in one way or another, critical of the tradition, a natural question to ask is: Why does the history of philosophy have importance for feminist philosophers? This question assumes that the history of philosophy is of importance for feminists, an assumption that (...)
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  6. Kathleen Canning (forthcoming). Feminist History After the Linguistic Turn: Historicizing Discourse and Experience. History and Theory: Feminist Research, Debates, Contestations.score: 174.0
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  7. Andrea Nye (1990). Words of Power: A Feminist Reading of the History of Logic. Routledge.score: 168.0
    Is logic masculine? Is women's lack of interest in the "hard core" philosophical disciplines of formal logic and semantics symptomatic of an inadequacy linked to sex? Is the failure of women to excel in pure mathematics and mathematical science a function of their inability to think rationally? Andrea Nye undermines the assumptions that inform these questions, assumptions such as: logic is unitary, logic is independenet of concrete human relations, and logic transcends historical circumstances as well as gender. In a series (...)
     
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  8. Penelope Deutscher (1997). Yielding Gender: Feminism, Deconstruction, and the History of Philosophy. Routledge.score: 156.0
    Yielding Gender explores and reconsiders the tensions that deconstruction poses for feminist philosophy. Emphasizing the important role of deconstruction in revealing the ambiguity and unstable nature of gender, Penelope Deutscher asks the crucial question: does the very instability of gender mean that we can no longer talk of a man or a woman of reason in the history of philosophy? Using the work of Judith Butler, Jacques Derrida and Luce Irigaray, Deutscher explores this question by examining the issue of (...)
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  9. Dena Goodman (1997). More Than Paradoxes to Offer: Feminist History as Critical Practice. History and Theory 36 (3):392–405.score: 156.0
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  10. Robyn Rowland & Renate Klein (1996). Radical Feminism: History, Politics, Action. In Diane Bell & Renate Klein (eds.), Radically Speaking: Feminism Reclaimed. Spinifex Press. 9--36.score: 156.0
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  11. Fernanda Henriques (2013). The Need for an Alternative Narrative to the History of Ideas or To Pay a Debt to Women: A Feminist Approach to Ricœur's Thought. Études Ricoeuriennes / Ricoeur Studies 4 (1):7-20.score: 156.0
    This paper explores the thought of Paul Ricœur from a feminist point of view. My goal is to show that it is necessary to narrate differently the history of our culture – in particular, the history of philosophy – in order for wommen to attain a self-representation that is equal to that of men. I seek to show that Ricoeur’s philosophy – especially his approach to the topics of memory and history, on the one hand, and the (...)
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  12. Daniel Whistler (2014). Howie's Between Feminism and Materialism and the Critical History of Religions. Sophia 53 (2):183-192.score: 156.0
    This essay traces the notion of abstraction through the works of Gillian Howie as a means of thinking through the nature of critique within philosophy of religion. In particular, it argues that Howie’s recovery of a more productive conception of abstraction in her late Between Feminism and Materialism is closely linked to the resurgence of real abstraction in recent Marxist theory. From these shifts, one can derive both an enriched conception of religion as real abstraction and a method of (...)
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  13. Dana Heller (forthcoming). Shooting Solanas: Radical Feminist History and the Technology of Failure. Feminist Studies.score: 156.0
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  14. Catherine Villanueva Gardner (2012). Empowerment and Interconnectivity: Toward a Feminist History of Utilitarian Philosophy. Penn State University Press.score: 156.0
    "Examines the work of three nineteenth-century utilitarian feminist philosophers: Catharine Beecher, Frances Wright, and Anna Doyle Wheeler.
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  15. Griselda Pollock (1992). Painting, Feminism, History. In Michèle Barrett & Anne Phillips (eds.), Destabilizing Theory: Contemporary Feminist Debates. Stanford University Press. 138--76.score: 156.0
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  16. Debra Thom (1992). A Lopsided View: Feminist History or the History of Women. In Kate Campbell (ed.), Critical Feminism: Argument in the Disciplines. Open University Press. 25--52.score: 156.0
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  17. Sarah S. Richardson (2009). The Left Vienna Circle, Part 2. The Left Vienna Circle, Disciplinary History, and Feminist Philosophy of Science. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 40 (2):167-174.score: 150.0
    This paper analyzes the claim that the Left Vienna Circle (LVC) offers a theoretical and historical precedent for a politically engaged philosophy of science today. I describe the model for a political philosophy of science advanced by LVC historians. They offer this model as a moderate, properly philosophical approach to political philosophy of science that is rooted in the analytic tradition. This disciplinary-historical framing leads to weaknesses in LVC scholars' conception of the history of the LVC and its contemporary (...)
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  18. A. W. Frank (1992). Medieval Bodies and Feminist History. Theory, Culture and Society 9 (4):161-168.score: 150.0
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  19. Jean Grimshaw (1982). Feminism: History and Morality. Radical Philosophy 30:3.score: 150.0
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  20. Rita Gross (1997). Buddhism After Patriarchy: A Feminist History, Analysis, and Reconstruction of Buddhism. Buddhist Christian Studies 17:261-264.score: 150.0
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  21. Laura Ruetsche (2004). Virtue and Contingent History: Possibilities for Feminist Epistemology. Hypatia 19 (1):73-101.score: 144.0
    : Some feminist epistemologists make the radical claim that there are varieties of epistemically valid warrant that agents access only through having lived particular types of contingent history, varieties of epistemic warrant to which, moreover, the confirmation-theoretic accounts of warrant favored by some traditional epistemologists are inapplicable. I offer Aristotelian virtue as a model for warrant of this sort, and use loosely Aristotelian vocabulary to express, and begin to evaluate, a range of feminist epistemological positions.
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  22. Licia Carlson (2001). Cognitive Ableism and Disability Studies: Feminist Reflections on the History of Mental Retardation. Hypatia 16 (4):124-146.score: 144.0
    This paper examines five groups of women that were instrumental in the emergence of the category of "feeblemindedness" in the United States. It analyzes the dynamics of oppression and power relations in the following five groups of women: "feeble-minded" women, institutional caregivers, mothers, researchers, and reformists. Ultimately, I argue that a feminist analysis of the history of mental retardation is necessary to serve as a guide for future feminist work on cognitive disability.
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  23. Sarah S. Richardson (2010). Feminist Philosophy of Science: History, Contributions, and Challenges. Synthese 177 (3):337 - 362.score: 144.0
    Feminist philosophy of science has led to improvements in the practices and products of scientific knowledge-making, and in this way it exemplifies socially relevant philosophy of science. It has also yielded important insights and original research questions for philosophy. Feminist scholarship on science thus presents a worthy thought-model for considering how we might build a more socially relevant philosophy of science—the question posed by the editors of this special issue. In this analysis of the history, contributions, and challenges faced (...)
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  24. Lisa Diedrich (2007). Doing Queer Love: Feminism, AIDS, and History. Theoria 54 (112):25-50.score: 144.0
    In this essay, I utilize the concept of the echo, as formulated in the historical and methodological work of Michel Foucault and Joan W. Scott, to help theorize the historical relationship between health feminism and AIDS activism. I trace the echoes between health feminism and AIDS activism in order to present a more complex history of both movements, and to try to think through the ways that the coming together of these two struggles in a particular place (...)
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  25. Uma Narayan (1998). Essence of Culture and a Sense of History: A Feminist Critique of Cultural Essentialism. Hypatia 13 (2):86 - 106.score: 126.0
    Drawing parallels between gender essentialism and cultural essentialism, I point to some common features of essentialist pictures of culture. I argue that cultural essentialism is detrimental to feminist agendas and suggest strategies for its avoidance. Contending that some forms of cultural relativism buy into essentialist notions of culture, I argue that postcolonial feminists need to be cautious about essentialist contrasts between "Western" and "Third World" cultures.
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  26. Mary Anne Warren (1989). Review: Feminist Archeology: Uncovering Women's Philosophical History. [REVIEW] Hypatia 4 (1):155 - 159.score: 126.0
    A History of Women Philosophers, Volume I: Ancient Women Philoophers, 600 B.C. - 500 A.D., edited by Mary Ellen Waithe, is an important but somewhat frustrating book. It is filled with tantalizing glimpses into the lives and thoughts of some of our earliest philosophical foremothers. Yet it lacks a clear unifying theme, and the abrupt transitions from one philosopher and period to the next are sometimes disconcerting. The overall effect is not unlike that of viewing an expansive landscape, (...)
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  27. Amy Allen (2013). Feminism, Foucault, and the Critique of Reason: Re-Reading the History of Madness. Foucault Studies 16:15-31.score: 126.0
    This paper situates Lynne Huffer’s recent queer-feminist Foucaultian critique of reason within the context of earlier feminist debates about reason and critically assesses Huffer’s work from the point of view of its faithfulness to Foucault’s work and its implications for feminism. I argue that Huffer’s characterization of Enlightenment reason as despotic not only departs from Foucault’s account of the relationship between power and reason, it also leaves her stuck in the same double binds that plagued earlier feminist critiques of (...)
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  28. Karen Offen (1987). New Documents for the History of French Feminism During the Early Third Republic. History of European Ideas 8 (4-5):621-624.score: 126.0
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  29. Ann-Louise Shapiro (forthcoming). Introduction: History and Feminist Theory, or Talking Back to the Beadle. History and Theory.score: 126.0
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  30. Beryl Satter (2006). Writing Gender History: What Does Feminism Have to Do with It? History and Theory 45 (3):436–447.score: 126.0
  31. Sara M. Evans (2013). Feminism's History and Historical Amnesia. Modern Intellectual History 10 (2):503-513.score: 126.0
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  32. Judith Kegan Gardiner (2008). What Happened to Socialist Feminist Women's Studies Programs? A Case History and Some Speculations. Feminist Studies 34 (3):558-583.score: 126.0
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  33. Elsa Barkley Brown (1997). 'What Has Happened Here': The Politics of Difference in Women's History and Feminist Politics. In Linda J. Nicholson (ed.), The Second Wave: A Reader in Feminist Theory. Routledge.score: 126.0
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  34. J. R. R. Christie (1990). Feminism and the History of Science. In R. C. Olby, G. N. Cantor, J. R. R. Christie & M. J. S. Hodge (eds.), Companion to the History of Modern Science. Routledge. 107--108.score: 126.0
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  35. Elizabeth Lapovsky Kennedy (2008). Socialist Feminism: What Difference Did It Make to the History of Women's Studies? Feminist Studies 34 (3):497-525.score: 126.0
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  36. Genevieve Lloyd (2000). Feminism in History of Philosophy: Appropriating the Past. In Miranda Fricker & Jennifer Hornsby (eds.), Cambridge Companion to Feminism in Philosophy. Cambridge University Press. 245--63.score: 126.0
  37. Tamae Mizuta & Marie Mulvey Roberts (eds.) (1994). Perspectives on the History of British Feminism. Routledge.score: 126.0
    Following on from Sources of British Feminism , the present six volumes contain primary source material on radicalism, marriage, motherhood, sexuality and militancy.
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  38. Molly Mullin (1991). Representations of History, Irish Feminism, and the Politics of Difference. Feminist Studies 17 (1):29-50.score: 126.0
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  39. Robin May Schott (2007). Feminism and the History of Philosophy. In Linda Alcoff & Eva Feder Kittay (eds.), The Blackwell Guide to Feminist Philosophy. Blackwell Pub..score: 126.0
  40. Jackie Stacey (1995). The Lost Audience: Methodology, Cinema History and Feminist Film Criticism'. In Beverley Skeggs (ed.), Feminist Cultural Theory: Process and Production. Distributed Exclusively in the Usa and Canada by St. Martin's Press. 97.score: 126.0
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  41. Tina Chanter (2000). The Trouble We (Feminists) Have Reasoning with Our Mothers: Penelope Deutscher, Yielding Gender: Feminism, Deconstruction, and the History of Philosophy. [REVIEW] Continental Philosophy Review 33 (4):487-497.score: 120.0
  42. Claire Colebrook (1997). Feminist Philosophy and the Philosophy of Feminism: Irigaray and the History of Western Metaphysics. Hypatia 12 (1):79 - 98.score: 120.0
  43. Joan Landes, The History of Feminism: Marie-Jean-Antoine-Nicolas de Caritat, Marquis de Condorcet. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 120.0
  44. Mary Leach (1990). Toward Writing Feminist Scholarship Into History of Education. Educational Theory 40 (4):453-461.score: 120.0
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  45. Robin May Schott (1999). Book Review: Penelope Deutscher. Yielding Gender: Feminism, Deconstruction and the History of Philosophy. London and New York: Routledge, 1997. [REVIEW] Hypatia 14 (3):157-162.score: 120.0
  46. Robin May Schott (1999). Yielding Gender: Feminism, Deconstruction, and the History of Philosophy (Review). Hypatia 14 (3):157-162.score: 120.0
  47. E. Christian Brugger, Stella Chen, Carrie E. Reed, Cao Yuqing, Kim-Chong Chong, Sor-Hoon Tan & C. L. Ten (2004). Raymond Aron, The Dawn of Universal History. New York: Basic Books, 2003, 518 Pp.(Indexed). ISBN 0-465-00408-3, $22.00 (Pb). Linda A. Bell, Beyond the Margins: Reflections of a Feminist Philosopher. Albany: State University of New York Press, 2003, 245 Pp.(Indexed). ISBN 0-7914-5904-7, $17.95 (Pb). [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry 38:433-435.score: 120.0
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  48. Penelope Deutscher (2012). Feminism and the History of Political Philosophy. In Gerald F. Gaus & Fred D'Agostino (eds.), The Routledge Companion to Social and Political Philosophy. Routledge. 278.score: 120.0
  49. Michael du Plessis (1990). "Am I That Name?": Feminism and the Category of Women in History (Review). Philosophy and Literature 14 (2):432-433.score: 120.0
  50. Susan Himmelweit (1991). Reproduction and the Materialist Conception of History: A Feminist Critique. In Terrell Carver (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Marx. Cambridge University Press. 1--196.score: 120.0
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