Search results for 'Feminism and science' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. in Postcolonial Feminism (1996). The Science Question. In Paul R. Gross, N. Levitt & Martin W. Lewis (eds.), The Flight From Science and Reason. The New York Academy of Sciences.score: 300.0
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  2. Bonnie Spanier (2000). Transforming Science Curricula in Higher Education: Feminist Contributions. Science and Engineering Ethics 6 (4):467-480.score: 168.0
    Feminist contributions to the science curricula in higher education constitute invaluable but often overlooked resources for truly effective communication about science. Here I share a sampling of feminist science studies and discuss the origins of this effort to create inclusive and less biased science curricula that serve all students and citizens. Challenges from scientists center on assumptions and values about the appropriate relationship between science and politics, while challenges from educators extend to assumptions about how (...)
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  3. Evelyn Fox Keller & Helen E. Longino (eds.) (1996). Feminism and Science. Oxford University Press.score: 156.0
    (Series copy) The new Oxford Readings in Feminism series maps the dramatic influence of feminist theory on every branch of academic knowledge. Offering feminist perspectives on disciplines from history to science, each book assembles the most important articles written on its field in the last ten to fifteen years. Old stereotypes are challenged and traditional attitudes upset in these lively-- and sometimes controversial--volumes, all of which are edited by feminists prominent in their particular field. Comprehensive, accessible, and intellectually (...)
     
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  4. Sharon Crasnow (2008). Feminist Philosophy of Science: 'Standpoint' and Knowledge. [REVIEW] Science and Education 17 (10):1089-1110.score: 150.0
    Feminist philosophy of science has been criticized on several counts. On the one hand, it is claimed that it results in relativism of the worst sort since the political commitment to feminism is prima facie incompatible with scientific objectivity. On the other hand, when critics acknowledge that there may be some value in work that feminists have done, they comment that there is nothing particularly feminist about their accounts. I argue that both criticisms can be addressed through a (...)
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  5. Monica Aufrecht (2011). The Context Distinction: Controversies Over Feminist Philosophy of Science. [REVIEW] European Journal for Philosophy of Science 1 (3):373-392.score: 150.0
    The “context of discovery” and “context of justification” distinction has been used by Noretta Koertge and Lynn Hankinson Nelson in debates over the legitimacy of feminist approaches to philosophy of science. Koertge uses the context distinction to focus the conversation by barring certain approaches. I contend this focus masks points of true disagreement about the nature of justification. Nonetheless, Koertge raises important questions that have been too quickly set aside by some. I conclude that the context distinction should not (...)
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  6. Janet A. Kourany (2010). Philosophy of Science After Feminism. Oxford University Press.score: 150.0
    A feminist primer for philosophers of science -- The legacy of twentieth century philosophy of science -- What feminist science studies can offer -- Challenges from every direction -- The prospects of twenty-first century philosophy of science.
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  7. Sharon Crasnow (2013). Feminist Philosophy of Science: Values and Objectivity. Philosophy Compass 8 (4):413-423.score: 144.0
    Feminist philosophy of science appears to present problems for the ideal of value-free science. These difficulties also challenge a traditional understanding of the objectivity of science. However, feminist philosophers of science have good reasons for desiring to retain some concept of objectivity. The present essay considers several recent and influential feminist approaches to the role of social and political values in science, with particular focus on feminist empiricism and feminist standpoint theory. The similarities and difference, (...)
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  8. Sharyn Clough (forthcoming). Pragmatism and Embodiment as Resources for Feminist Interventions in Science. Contemporary Pragmatism Vol. 10 (2).score: 144.0
    Feminist theorists have shown that knowledge is embodied in ways that make a difference in science. Intemann properly endorses feminist standpoint theory over Longino’s empiricism, insofar as the former better addresses embodiment. I argue that a pragmatist analysis further improves standpoint theory: Pragmatism avoids the radical subjectivity that otherwise leaves us unable to account for our ability to share scientific knowledge across bodies of different kinds; and it allows us to argue for the inclusion, not just of the knowledge (...)
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  9. Sandra G. Harding & Merrill B. Hintikka (eds.) (2003). Discovering Reality: Feminist Perspectives on Epistemology, Metaphysics, Methodology, and Philosophy of Science. Kluwer Academic Publishers.score: 144.0
    This collection of essays, first published two decades ago, presents central feminist critiques and analyses of natural and social sciences and their philosophies. Unfortunately, in spite of the brilliant body of research and scholarship in these fields in subsequent decades, the insights of these essays remain as timely now as they were then: philosophy and the sciences still presume kinds of social innocence to which they are not entitled. The essays focus on Plato, Aristotle, Descartes, Hobbes, Rousseau, and Marx; on (...)
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  10. Elizabeth Potter (2006). Feminism and Philosophy of Science. Routledge.score: 144.0
    Feminist perspectives have been increasingly influential on philosophy of science. Feminism and Philosophy of Science is designed to introduce the newcomer to the central themes, issues and arguments of this burgeoning area of study. Elizabeth Potter engages in a rigorous and well-organized study that takes in the views of key feminist theorists - Nelson, Wylie, Anderson, Longino and Harding - whose arguments exemplify contemporary feminist philosophy of science. The book is divided into six chapters looking at (...)
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  11. Matthew J. Brown & Joyce C. Havstad, The Science and Politics of Global Climate Change: A Feminist Pragmatist Perspective.score: 144.0
    We offer a critical analysis of the science and politics of global climate change from a feminist pragmatist perspective, with special attention to the interactions between science and policy. We find the current state of play in all three areas (science, policy, and the space of interaction between them) to be lacking. We attribute mutual responsibility for the current impasse in addressing the climate crisis. What is called for is an alternative framework for thinking about science (...)
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  12. Jane Duran (1998). Philosophies of Science/Feminist Theories. Westview Press.score: 144.0
    This book presents the current feminist critique of science and the philosophy of science in such a way that students of philosophy of science, philosophers, feminist theorists, and scientists will find the material accessible and intellectually rigorous.Contemporary feminist debate, as well as the debate brought on by the radical critics of science, assumes—incorrectly—that certain movements in philosophy of science and science-driven theory are understood in their dynamics as well as in their details. All too (...)
     
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  13. Bonnie Shulman (2000). Commentary on “Transforming Science Curricula in Higher Education: Feminist Contributions” (B. Spanier). Science and Engineering Ethics 6 (4):481-484.score: 138.0
  14. Donna Haraway (1988). Situated Knowledges: The Science Question in Feminism and the Privilege of Partial Perspective. Feminist Studies 14 (3):575-599.score: 138.0
  15. Sharyn Clough (2004). Having It All: Naturalized Normativity in Feminist Science Studies. Hypatia 19 (1):102-118.score: 132.0
    : The relationship between facts and values—in particular, naturalism and normativity—poses an ongoing challenge for feminist science studies. Some have argued that the fact/value holism of W.V. Quine's naturalized epistemology holds promise. I argue that Quinean epistemology, while appropriately naturalized, might weaken the normative force of feminist claims. I then show that Quinean epistemic themes are unnecessary for feminist science studies. The empirical nature of our work provides us with all the naturalized normativity we need.
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  16. Margret Grebowicz (2005). Consensus, Dissensus, and Democracy: What Is at Stake in Feminist Science Studies? Philosophy of Science 72 (5):989-1000.score: 126.0
    If feminists argue for the irreducibility of the social dimensions of science, then they ought to embrace the idea that feminist and non-feminist scientists are not in collaboration, but in fact defend different interests. Instead, however, contemporary feminist science studies literature argues that feminist research improves particular, existing scientific enterprises, both epistemically (truer claims) and politically (more democratic methodologies and applications). I argue that the concepts of empirical success and democracy at work in this literature from Longino (1994) (...)
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  17. Kirsten Campbell (2004). The Promise of Feminist Reflexivities: Developing Donna Haraway's Project for Feminist Science Studies. Hypatia 19 (1):162-182.score: 120.0
    : This paper explores models of reflexive feminist science studies through the work of Donna Haraway. The paper argues that Haraway provides an important account of science studies that is both feminist and constructivist. However, her concepts of "situated knowledges" and "diffraction" need further development to be adequate models of feminist science studies. To develop this constructivist and feminist project requires a collective research program that engages with feminist reflexivity as a practice.
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  18. Susan Haack (1992). Science 'From a Feminist Perspective'. Philosophy 67 (259):5 - 18.score: 120.0
    Women themselves, for the most part, think of themselves as the sensible sex, whose business it is to undo the harm that comes of men's impetuous follies. For my part, I distrust all generalizations about women, favourable and unfavourable, masculine and feminine, ancient and modern; all alike, I should say, result from paucity of experience.
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  19. Helen E. Longino (1987). Can There Be A Feminist Science? Hypatia 2 (3):51 - 64.score: 120.0
    This paper explores a number of recent proposals regarding "feminist science" and rejects a content-based approach in favor of a process-based approach to characterizing feminist science. Philosophy of science can yield models of scientific reasoning that illuminate the interaction between cultural values and ideology and scientific inquiry. While we can use these models to expose masculine and other forms of bias, we can also use them to defend the introduction of assumptions grounded in feminist political values.
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  20. Matthew Drabek (2012). Philosophy of Science After Feminism. By Janet Kourany. (Oxford UP, 2010. Pp. Ix. + 149. Price US$99.00.). Philosophical Quarterly 62 (248):631-633.score: 120.0
  21. Maya J. Goldenberg, Resituating Evidence in Feminist Science Studies.score: 120.0
    This paper examines the conclusions that one must draw from the finding that there are values in science. The value-ladenness of scientific claims puts the nature and role of empirical evidence into question, as seen in recent discussions in the philosophy of medicine regarding evidence-based medicine and feminist science studies, which maintains the normativity of its feminist claims. Within the critical literature and debates surrounding evidence-based medicine (EBM), one finds a championing of the lessons learned from post-positivist (...) studies: the evidence-based effort to ground medical decision-making in the most rigorous sources of scientific evidence obscures the social values that necessarily enter into all decision-making contexts, the complex social context of clinical practice being no exception. The critics of EBM claim that to try to derive a formal methodology governed by pre-established rules, guidelines, and hierarchies of information misplaces the contextual and social features of biomedical knowledge and practice, thereby obscuring the power interests that so problematically dictate large factions of biomedical research and practice. Yet possible relativist implications follow from this finding, and we find that the EBM critics amply criticize EBM’s tacit theory of evidence, but then fail to formulate a constructive alternative theory of evidence within this fact-value interplay. After overviewing some such criticisms of evidence-based medicine, I turn to contemporary critical science studies, especially the feminist empiricism of Lynn Hankinson Nelson and Helen Longino, for workable alternative theories of evidence within a framework of normative scientific claims. I will suggest these theories fail to guide medical decision-making because of some undesirable consequences of Quinean fact-value holism: the denial that our values have logical content and are therefore not empirically examinable relativises even these nuanced conceptions of evidence. A naturalized look at how facts and values actually interact in medical decision-making suggests that this fact/value holism is not realistic. I provide an illustrative example of a physician devising a treatment recommendation for a patient to demonstrate that in practice, facts and values intermingle in the decision-making process without indeterminacy and subsequent appeals to moral and political frameworks, as feminist empiricism suggests. In the end, value-laden evidence can retain its adjudicative force and normativity. (shrink)
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  22. Robyn Bluhm, Anne Jaap Jacobson & Heidi Lene Maibom (eds.) (2012). Neurofeminism: Issues at the Intersection of Feminist Theory and Cognitive Science. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 120.0
  23. Judith A. Little (ed.) (2007). Feminist Philosophy and Science Fiction: Utopias and Dystopias. Prometheus Books.score: 120.0
     
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  24. Lynda I. A. Birke (1994). Feminism, Animals, and Science: The Naming of the Shrew. Open University Press.score: 120.0
  25. Lynn Hankinson Nelson & Alison Wylie (2004). Introduction: Special Issue on Feminist Science Studies. Hypatia 19 (1).score: 114.0
    Feminist analyses of science have grown dramatically in scope, diversity, and impact in the years since Nancy Tuana edited the two-volume issue of Hypatia on “Feminism and Science” (Fall 1987, Spring 1988). What had begun in the 1960s and 1970s as a “trickle of scholarship on feminism and science” had widened by the mid-1980s “into a continuous stream” (Rosser 1987, 5). Fifteen years later, the stream has become something of a torrent. The essays assembled for (...)
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  26. Mariamne Whatley (1986). Taking Feminist Science to the Classroom: Where Do We Go From Here. In Ruth Bleier (ed.), Feminist Approaches to Science. Pergamon Press. 181--190.score: 114.0
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  27. Cassandra L. Pinnick (1994). Feminist Epistemology: Implications for Philosophy of Science. Philosophy of Science 61 (4):646-657.score: 102.0
    This article examines the best contemporary arguments for a feminist epistemology of scientific knowledge as found in recent works by S. Harding. I argue that no feminist epistemology of science is worthy of the name, because such an epistemology fails to escape well-known vicissitudes of epistemic relativism. But feminist epistemology merits attention from philosophers of science because it is part of a larger relativist turn in the social sciences and humanities that now aims to extend its critique to (...)
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  28. Angela Potochnik (2012). Feminist Implications of Model-Based Science. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 43 (2):383-389.score: 102.0
    Recent philosophy of science has witnessed a shift in focus, in that significantly more consideration is given to how scientists employ models. Attending to the role of models in scientific practice leads to new questions about the representational roles of models, the purpose of idealizations, why multiple models are used for the same phenomenon, and many more besides. In this paper, I suggest that these themes resonate with central topics in feminist epistemology, in particular prominent versions of feminist empiricism, (...)
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  29. Sarah S. Richardson (2009). The Left Vienna Circle, Part 2. The Left Vienna Circle, Disciplinary History, and Feminist Philosophy of Science. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 40 (2):167-174.score: 102.0
    This paper analyzes the claim that the Left Vienna Circle (LVC) offers a theoretical and historical precedent for a politically engaged philosophy of science today. I describe the model for a political philosophy of science advanced by LVC historians. They offer this model as a moderate, properly philosophical approach to political philosophy of science that is rooted in the analytic tradition. This disciplinary-historical framing leads to weaknesses in LVC scholars' conception of the history of the LVC and (...)
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  30. Lynn Hankinson Nelson (1995). A Feminist Naturalized Philosophy of Science. Synthese 104 (3):399 - 421.score: 102.0
    Building on developments in feminist science scholarship and the philosophy of science, I advocate two methodological principles as elements of a naturalized philosophy of science. One principle incorporates a holistic account of evidence inclusive of claims and theories informed by and/or expressive of politics and non-constitutive values; the second takes communities, rather than individual scientists, to be the primary loci of scientific knowledge. I use case studies to demonstrate that these methodological principles satisfy three criteria for naturalization (...)
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  31. Michael Ruse (1984). Biological Science and Feminist Values. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1984:525 - 542.score: 102.0
    Feminist writers argue that values permeate science. Using Ernan McMullin's discussion of values in science as a guide, the feminist position is accepted and an attempt is made to show why their position is one which should be noted by conventional philosophers of science.
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  32. Elizabeth Potter (1994). Methodological Norms in Traditional and Feminist Philosophy of Science. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1994:101 - 108.score: 102.0
    I argue against the assumption that the influence of non-cognitive values must lead to bad science and against the methodological norm that seems to some philosophers to follow from it, viz. that a good philosophy of science should analyze the morally and politically neutral production of good science. Against these, I argue for the assumption that non-cognitive values are compatible with good science and for the metaphilosophical norm that a good philosophy of science should allow (...)
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  33. Noretta Koertge (1980). Methodology, Ideology and Feminist Critiques of Science. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1980:346 - 359.score: 102.0
    This paper deals with two questions. First, if all scientists were perfect Popperians, how much influence could their background values and experiences have? It is argued that background can play a role in problem choice and in the constructing and testing of hypotheses. Second, do the ideals of feminism suggest the need for a new methodology and epistemology for science? In answering this question, Harding's paper in this volume is discussed.
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  34. Ronald N. Giere (1996). The Feminism Question in the Philosophy of Science. In. In Lynn Hankinson Nelson & Jack Nelson (eds.), Feminism, Science, and the Philosophy of Science. 3--15.score: 102.0
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  35. Sandra Harding (1996). Multicultural and Global Feminist Philosophies of Science: Resources and Challenges. In. In Lynn Hankinson Nelson & Jack Nelson (eds.), Feminism, Science, and the Philosophy of Science. 263--287.score: 102.0
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  36. Nancy McHugh (2006). On the Very Idea of a Feminist Epistemology for Science: Review Symposium for Sharyn Clough's Beyond Epistemology: A Pragmatist Approach to Feminist Science Studies. Metascience 15 (1):15-21.score: 102.0
  37. Elizabeth Anderson, Feminist Epistemology and Philosophy of Science.score: 96.0
    Feminist epistemology and philosophy of science studies the ways in which gender does and ought to influence our conceptions of knowledge, the knowing subject, and practices of inquiry and justification. It identifies ways in which dominant conceptions and practices of knowledge attribution, acquisition, and justification systematically disadvantage women and other subordinated groups, and strives to reform these conceptions and practices so that they serve the interests of these groups. Various practitioners of feminist epistemology and philosophy of science argue (...)
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  38. Elizabeth Anderson (2004). Uses of Value Judgments in Science: A General Argument, with Lessons From a Case Study of Feminist Research on Divorce. Hypatia 19 (1):1-24.score: 96.0
    : The underdetermination argument establishes that scientists may use political values to guide inquiry, without providing criteria for distinguishing legitimate from illegitimate guidance. This paper supplies such criteria. Analysis of the confused arguments against value-laden science reveals the fundamental criterion of illegitimate guidance: when value judgments operate to drive inquiry to a predetermined conclusion. A case study of feminist research on divorce reveals numerous legitimate ways that values can guide science without violating this standard.
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  39. Maya J. Goldenberg (2013). How Can Feminist Theories of Evidence Assist Clinical Reasoning and Decision-Making? Social Epistemology (TBA):1-28.score: 96.0
    While most of healthcare research and practice fully endorses evidence-based healthcare, a minority view borrows popular themes from philosophy of science like underdetermination and value-ladenness to question the legitimacy of the evidence-based movement’s philosophical underpinnings. While the feminist origins go unacknowledged, those critics adopt a feminist reading of the “gap argument” to challenge the perceived objectivism of evidence-based practice. From there, the critics seem to despair over the “subjective elements” that values introduce to clinical reasoning, demonstrating that they do (...)
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  40. Alison Wylie, Elizabeth Potter & Wenda K. Bauchspies, Feminist Perspectives on Science. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 96.0
    Feminists have a number of distinct interests in, and perspectives on, science. The tools of science have been a crucial resource for understanding the nature, impact, and prospects for changing gender-based forms of oppression; in this spirit, feminists actively draw on, and contribute to, the research programs of a wide range of sciences. At the same time, feminists have identified the sciences as a source as well as a locus of gender inequalities: the institutions of science have (...)
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  41. Londa L. Schiebinger (2004). Feminist History of Colonial Science. Hypatia 19 (1):233-254.score: 96.0
    : This essay offers a short overview of feminist history of science and introduces a new project into that history, namely feminist history of colonial science. My case study focuses on eighteenth-century voyages of scientific discovery and reveals how gender relations in Europe and the colonies honed selective collecting practices. Cultural, economic, and political trends discouraged the transfer from the New World to the Old of abortifacients (widely used by Amerindian and African women in the West Indies).1.
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  42. Lisa H. Weasel (2004). Feminist Intersections in Science: Race, Gender and Sexuality Through the Microscope. Hypatia 19 (1):183-193.score: 96.0
    : This paper investigates the mutual embeddedness of "nature" and "culture," as well as the intersections between race, gender, and sexuality, in the story of the HeLa cell line as viewed by a practicing feminist scientist. It provides a feminist analysis of the scientific discourse surrounding the HeLa cell line, and explores how feminist theories of science can provide a constructive and critical lens through which laboratory scientists can view their work.
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  43. Lisa Weasel (2001). Dismantling the Self/Other Dichotomy in Science: Towards a Feminist Model of the Immune System. Hypatia 16 (1):27-44.score: 96.0
    : Despite the development of a vast body of literature pertaining to feminism and science, examples of how feminist philosophies might be applied to scientific theories and practice have been limited. Moreover, most scientists remain unfamiliar with how feminism pertains to their work. Using the example of the immune system, this paper applies three feminist epistemologies--feminist empiricism, feminist standpoint theory, and feminist postmodernism--to assess competing claims of immune function within a feminist context.
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  44. Carla Fehr, Feminism and Science: Mechanism Without Reductionism.score: 96.0
    During the scientific revolution reductionism and mechanism were introduced together. These concepts remained intertwined through much of the ensuing history of philosophy and science, resulting in the privileging of approaches to research that focus on the smallest bits of nature. This combination of concepts has been the object of intense feminist criticism, as it encourages biological determinism, narrows researchers’ choices of problems and methods, and allows researchers to ignore the contextual features of the phenomena they investigate. I argue (...)
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  45. Nancy Tuana (1995). The Values of Science: Empiricism From a Feminist Perspective. Synthese 104 (3):441 - 461.score: 96.0
    This essay delineates the contributions of feminist critiques of science to contemporary reconstructions of empiricism. I argue that three central tenets arise from feminist attention to the dynamics of gender and oppression in the theories and methods of science: 1) a rejection of the science/politics dichotomy; 2) an acknowledgement of the epistemic import of subjective components of knowledge; and 3) a reconfiguration of the subject of knowledge. These three tenets are illustrated and supported through examples from the (...)
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  46. Barbara Imber & Nancy Tuana (1988). Feminist Perspectives on Science. Hypatia 3 (1):139 - 144.score: 96.0
    In this issue of Hypatia there is a consensus that science is not value-neutral and that cultural/political concerns enter into the epistemology, methodology and conclusions of scientific theory and practice. In future dialogues the question that needs to be further addressed is the precise role political concerns should play in the formulation of a feminist theory and practice of science.
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  47. Deboleena Roy (2004). Feminist Theory in Science: Working Toward a Practical Transformation. Hypatia 19 (1):255-279.score: 96.0
    : Although a rich tradition of feminist critiques of science exists, it is often difficult for feminists who are scientists to bridge these critiques with practical transformations in scientific knowledge production. In this paper, I go beyond the general bases of feminist critiques of science by using feminist theory in science to illustrate how a practical transformation in methodology can change molecular biology based research in the reproductive sciences.
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  48. Joseph Rouse (1998). New Philosophies of Science in North America — Twenty Years Later. Journal for General Philosophy of Science 29 (1):71-122.score: 96.0
    This survey of major developments in North American philosophy of science begins with the mid-1960s consolidation of the disciplinary synthesis of internalist history and philosophy of science (HPS) as a response to criticisms of logical empiricism. These developments are grouped for discussion under the following headings: historical metamethodologies, scientific realisms, philosophies of the special sciences, revivals of empiricism, cognitivist naturalisms, social epistemologies, feminist theories of science, studies of experiment and the disunity of science, and studies of (...)
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  49. Linda Alcoff (1987). Justifying Feminist Social Science. Hypatia 2 (3):107 - 127.score: 96.0
    In this paper I set out the problem of feminist social science as the need to explain and justify its method of theory choice in relation to both its own theories and those of androcentric social science. In doing this, it needs to avoid both a positivism which denies the impact of values on scientific theory-choice and a radical relativism which undercuts the emancipatory potential of feminist research. From the relevant literature I offer two possible solutions: the Holistic (...)
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  50. Sarah S. Richardson (2010). Feminist Philosophy of Science: History, Contributions, and Challenges. Synthese 177 (3):337 - 362.score: 96.0
    Feminist philosophy of science has led to improvements in the practices and products of scientific knowledge-making, and in this way it exemplifies socially relevant philosophy of science. It has also yielded important insights and original research questions for philosophy. Feminist scholarship on science thus presents a worthy thought-model for considering how we might build a more socially relevant philosophy of science—the question posed by the editors of this special issue. In this analysis of the history, contributions, (...)
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