Search results for 'Feminist Epistemology' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Nancy Daukas (2011). Altogether Now: A Virtue-Theoretic Approach to Pluralism in Feminist Epistemology In. In Heidi Grasswick (ed.), Feminist Epistemology and Philosophy of Science: Power in Knowledge.score: 270.0
    In this paper I develop and support a feminist virtue epistemology and bring it into conversation with feminist contextual empiricism and feminist standpoint theory. The virtue theory I develop is centered on the virtue of epistemic trustworthiness, which foregrounds the social/political character of knowledge practices and products, and the differences between epistemic agencies that perpetuate, on the one hand, and displace, on the other hand, normative patterns of unjust epistemic discrimination. I argue that my view answers (...)
     
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  2. Evelyn Brister (2009). Feminist Epistemology, Contextualism, and Philosophical Skepticism. Metaphilosophy 40 (5):671-688.score: 240.0
    Abstract: This essay explores the relation between feminist epistemology and the problem of philosophical skepticism. Even though feminist epistemology has not typically focused on skepticism as a problem, I argue that a feminist contextualist epistemology may solve many of the difficulties facing recent contextualist responses to skepticism. Philosophical skepticism appears to succeed in casting doubt on the very possibility of knowledge by shifting our attention to abnormal contexts. I argue that this shift in context (...)
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  3. Marianne Janack, Feminist Epistemology. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 210.0
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  4. Alison Adam (2000). Deleting the Subject: A Feminist Reading of Epistemology in Artificial Intelligence. Minds and Machines 10 (2):231-253.score: 210.0
    This paper argues that AI follows classical versions of epistemology in assuming that the identity of the knowing subject is not important. In other words this serves to `delete the subject''. This disguises an implicit hierarchy of knowers involved in the representation of knowledge in AI which privileges the perspective of those who design and build the systems over alternative perspectives. The privileged position reflects Western, professional masculinity. Alternative perspectives, denied a voice, belong to less powerful groups including women. (...)
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  5. Marguerite La Caze (2008). Michele le Doeuff Feminist Epistemology and the Unthought. Hecate 34 (2):62-79..score: 210.0
     
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  6. Jelena Mijic (2013). Feminist Epistemology: “Daughters of Quine”. Filozofija I Društvo 24 (3):156-176.score: 198.0
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  7. Kory Spencer Sorrell (2004). Representative Practices: Peirce, Pragmatism, and Feminist Epistemology. Fordham University Press.score: 192.0
    Although widely recognized as founder and key figure in the current re-emergence of pragmatism, Charles Peirce is rarely brought into contemporary dialogue. In this book, Kory Sorrell shows that Peirce has much to offer contemporary debate and deepens the value of Peirce’s view of representation in light of feminist epistemology, philosophy of science, and cultural anthropology. Drawing also on William James and John Dewey, Sorrell identifies ways in which bias, authority, and purpose are ineluctable constituents of shared representation. (...)
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  8. Alexandra L. Shuford (2010). Feminist Epistemology and American Pragmatism: Dewey and Quine. Continuum.score: 188.0
    Birthing feminist pragmatist epistemologies -- Feminist epistemologies -- Embodiment -- Project overview -- Quine's naturalized epistemology -- A brief history of objectivity in western philosophy -- Quine's empiricism -- Holism -- Ontological and epistemological impact -- Antony's analytic feminist empiricism -- Objectivity and the bias paradox -- Quine's naturalized epistemology solves bias paradox -- Anti-quinean realism -- Nelson's holistic feminist empiricism -- Nelson's holism -- Communities as knowers -- Facts/values -- Dewey's theory of inquiry (...)
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  9. Heidi E. Grasswick & Mark Owen Webb (2002). Feminist Epistemology as Social Epistemology. Social Epistemology 16 (3):185 – 196.score: 186.0
    More than one philosopher has expressed puzzlement at the very idea of feminist epistemology. Metaphysics and epistemology, sometimes called the 'core' areas of philosophy, are supposed to be immune to questions of value and justice. Nevertheless, many philosophers have raised epistemological questions starting from feminist-motivated moral and political concerns. The field is burgeoning; a search of the Philosopher's Index reveals that although nothing was published before 1981 that was categorized as both feminist and epistemology, (...)
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  10. Jane Duran (2003). Feminist Epistemology and Social Epistemics. Social Epistemology 17 (1):45 – 54.score: 182.0
    Recent work in naturalised epistemology has focused almost exclusively on the intersection of cognitive psychology and theory of knowledge; work from sociolinguistics is just now beginning to gain ground. At the same time, feminist epistemologies have striven to articulate the precise paths of connectedness and relatedness that gynocentric theory standardly postulates as being characteristic of female ways of knowing. This paper attempts to articulate the intersection of sociolinguistically naturalised epistemology and feminist theory of knowledge. A model (...)
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  11. Elizabeth Anderson, Feminist Epistemology and Philosophy of Science.score: 180.0
    Feminist epistemology and philosophy of science studies the ways in which gender does and ought to influence our conceptions of knowledge, the knowing subject, and practices of inquiry and justification. It identifies ways in which dominant conceptions and practices of knowledge attribution, acquisition, and justification systematically disadvantage women and other subordinated groups, and strives to reform these conceptions and practices so that they serve the interests of these groups. Various practitioners of feminist epistemology and philosophy of (...)
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  12. Elizabeth Anderson (1995). Feminist Epistemology: An Interpretation and a Defense. Hypatia 10 (3):50 - 84.score: 180.0
    Feminist epistemology has often been understood as the study of feminine "ways of knowing." But feminist epistemology is better understood as the branch of naturalized, social epistemology that studies the various influences of norms and conceptions of gender and gendered interests and experiences on the production of knowledge. This understanding avoids dubious claims about feminine cognitive differences and enables feminist research in various disciplines to pose deep internal critiques of mainstream research.
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  13. Cassandra L. Pinnick (1994). Feminist Epistemology: Implications for Philosophy of Science. Philosophy of Science 61 (4):646-657.score: 180.0
    This article examines the best contemporary arguments for a feminist epistemology of scientific knowledge as found in recent works by S. Harding. I argue that no feminist epistemology of science is worthy of the name, because such an epistemology fails to escape well-known vicissitudes of epistemic relativism. But feminist epistemology merits attention from philosophers of science because it is part of a larger relativist turn in the social sciences and humanities that now aims (...)
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  14. Helen Longino (2010). Feminist Epistemology at Hypatia's 25th Anniversary. Hypatia 25 (4):733-741.score: 180.0
    This essay surveys twenty-five years of feminist epistemology in the pages of Hypatia. Feminist contributions have addressed the affective dimensions of knowledge; the natures of justification, rationality, and the cognitive agent; and the nature of truth. They reflect thinking from both analytic and continental philosophical traditions and offer a rich tapestry of ideas from which to continue challenging tradition and forging analytical tools for the problems ahead.
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  15. Lynn Hankinson Nelson (1995). The Very Idea of Feminist Epistemology. Hypatia 10 (3):31 - 49.score: 180.0
    The juxtaposition encompassed in the phrase "feminist epistemology" strikes some feminist theorists and mainstream epistemologists as incongruous. To others, the phrase signals the view that epistemology and the philosophy of science are not what some of their practitioners and advocates have wanted or claimed them to be-but also are not "dead," as some of their critics proclaim. This essay explores the grounds for and implications of each view and recommends the second.
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  16. Louise M. Antony (2000). Situating Feminist Epistemology. The Proceedings of the Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy 2000:31-40.score: 180.0
    I understand feminist epistemology to be epistemology put at the service of feminist politics. That is, a feminist epistemology is dedicated to answering the many questions about knowledge that arise in the course of feminist efforts to understand and transform patriarchal structures, questions such as: Why have so many intellectual traditions denigrated the cognitive capacities of women? Are there gender differences in epistemic capacities or strategies, and what would be the implications for (...) if there were? I argue here that such questions situate feminist epistemology much more in mainstream epistemological discussion than probably most feminists would admit, finding that, at least for issues in these areas, the naturalistic approach to the study of knowledge advocated by W. V. Quine has been extremely useful. (shrink)
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  17. Zhenhua Yu (2007). Feminist Epistemology in a Polanyian Perspective. Tradition and Discovery 34 (1):49-53.score: 180.0
    In her elaboration of the distinction between connected knowing and separate knowing, Professor Clinchy addresses some conceptual relations that are central to Polanyi’s epistemology. I believe Polanyi would be happy to see the strong echoes ofhis thoughts in feminist epistemology, and the feminists will find substantial support from Polanyi’s philosophy.
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  18. Jane Duran (2008). Global Bioethics and Feminist Epistemology. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 22 (2):303-310.score: 180.0
    Lines of argument to support the notion that global bioethics can use work from feminist epistemology are set out, and much of the support for such contentions comes from specific cases of ethical issues in indigenous cultures. Theorists such as Kuhse, Arizpe, Egnor and Bumiller are cited, and it is concluded that local feminist epistemologies often conflict with standard ethical views, but that the failure to incorporate feminist thought undercuts hopes to establish a viable bioethics on (...)
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  19. Mary Jean Walker & Wendy Rogers (2014). What Can Feminist Epistemology Do for Surgery? Hypatia 29 (2):404-421.score: 180.0
    Surgery is an important part of contemporary health care, but currently much of surgery lacks a strong evidence base. Uptake of evidence-based medicine (EBM) methods within surgical research and among practitioners has been slow compared with other areas of medicine. Although this is often viewed as arising from practical and cultural barriers, it also reflects a lack of epistemic fit between EBM research methods and surgical practice. In this paper we discuss some epistemic challenges in surgery relating to this lack (...)
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  20. Louise Racine (2009). Examining the Conflation of Multiculturalism, Sexism, and Religious Fundamentalism Through Taylor and Bakhtin: Expanding Post-Colonial Feminist Epistemology. Nursing Philosophy 10 (1):14-25.score: 174.0
    In this post-9/11 era marked by religious and ethnic conflicts and the rise of cultural intolerance, ambiguities arising from the conflation of multiculturalism, sexism, and religious fundamentalism jeopardize the delivery of culturally safe nursing care to non-Western populations. This new social reality requires nurses to develop a heightened awareness of health issues pertaining to racism and ethnocentrism to provide culturally safe care to non-Western immigrants or refugees. Through the lens of post-colonial feminism, this paper explores the challenge of providing culturally (...)
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  21. Mary Magada-Ward (2010). Feminist Epistemology and American Pragmatism: Dewey and Quine (Review). Journal of Speculative Philosophy 24 (2):197-200.score: 174.0
    Alexandra Shuford's book is primarily designed to address the following question: "What can Deweyan pragmatism contribute to a feminist empiricist epistemology?" (viii). Her answer is Dewey's conception of habit, and in her final chapter, she illustrates the utility of this conception by comparing what she labels the "medicalized" model of labor and birth to that employed by practitioners of midwifery. Before looking at Shuford's reading of this contrast more closely, however, it needs to be noted at the outset (...)
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  22. Laura Sells (1993). Review: Feminist Epistemology: Rethinking the Dualisms of Atomic Knowledge. [REVIEW] Hypatia 8 (3):202 - 210.score: 174.0
    Feminist epistemologists who attempt to refigure epistemology must wrestle with a number of dualisms. This essay examines the ways Lorraine Code, Sandra Harding, and Susan Hekman reconceptualize the relationship between self/other, nature/culture, and subject/object as they struggle to reformulate objectivity and knowledge.
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  23. Mark Owen Webb (1995). Feminist Epistemology and the Extent of the Social. Hypatia 10 (3):85 - 98.score: 174.0
    Many feminist epistemologists have been inclined to embrace socialized epistemology. There are, however, many different theses that go by that name. Sandra Harding, Lynn Hankinson Nelson, and Elizabeth Potter hold various of these theses, but their reasons for holding those theses, while they do support less ambitious theses, do not support the theses they are offered to support.
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  24. Kirsten Campbell (2004). Jacques Lacan and Feminist Epistemology. Routledge.score: 168.0
    In this ground breaking new book, Kirsten Campbell takes up the debate, but instead of asking what feminist politics is or should be, she examines how feminism changes the ways we understand ourselves and others. Using Lacanian psychoanalysis as a starting point, Campbell examines contemporary feminism's turn to accounts of feminist "knowing" to create new conceptions of the political, before going on to develop a theory of that feminist knowing as political practice in itself.
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  25. Susan Haack (1985). Discovering Reality: Feminist Perspectives on Epistemology, Metaphysics, Methodology and Philosophy of Science Edited by S. Harding and M. B. Hintikka Dordrecht: Reidel, 1983, 322 Pp. [REVIEW] Philosophy 60 (232):265-.score: 168.0
  26. Alison M. Jaggar (2000). Ethics Naturalized: Feminism's Contribution to Moral Epistemology. Metaphilosophy 31 (5):452-468.score: 168.0
  27. Laura Ruetsche (2004). Virtue and Contingent History: Possibilities for Feminist Epistemology. Hypatia 19 (1):73-101.score: 164.0
    : Some feminist epistemologists make the radical claim that there are varieties of epistemically valid warrant that agents access only through having lived particular types of contingent history, varieties of epistemic warrant to which, moreover, the confirmation-theoretic accounts of warrant favored by some traditional epistemologists are inapplicable. I offer Aristotelian virtue as a model for warrant of this sort, and use loosely Aristotelian vocabulary to express, and begin to evaluate, a range of feminist epistemological positions.
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  28. Kathleen Lennon & Margaret Whitford (eds.) (1994). Knowing the Difference: Feminist Perspectives in Epistemology. Routledge.score: 162.0
    This collection is one of the first to offer feminist perspectives on epistemology from thinkers outside North America. It presents essays from an international group of contributors, including Rosi Braidotti, Gemma Corradi Fiumara, Anna Yeatman, Sabina Lovibond and Liz Stanley. Using approaches and methods from both analytic and continental philosophy, the contributors engage with questions of traditional epistemology and with issues raised by postmodernist critiques. The essays deal with the central question of difference: the difference which a (...)
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  29. Nancy McHugh (2006). On the Very Idea of a Feminist Epistemology for Science: Review Symposium for Sharyn Clough's Beyond Epistemology: A Pragmatist Approach to Feminist Science Studies. Metascience 15 (1):15-21.score: 162.0
  30. Pieranna Garavaso & Nicla Vassallo (2003). On the Virtues and Plausibility of Feminist Epistemologies. Epistemologia, Rivista Italiana di Filosofia Della Scienza (1):99-131.score: 160.0
    In this paper, we examine some issues debated in mainstream epistemology for which the social features of knowledge are relevant, such as the epistemic relevance of social contexts, the nature of practical knowledge, and the epistemic role of testimony. In the first part of the paper, we show how feminist epistemologies have usefully stressed the social character of knowledge in many central areas of debate within mainstream epistemology. We call these the virtues of feminist epistemology: (...)
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  31. Letitia Meynell (2008). Pictures, Pluralism, and Feminist Epistemology: Lessons From “Coming to Understand”. Hypatia 23 (4):pp. 1-29.score: 156.0
    Meynell’s contention is that feminists should attend to pictures in science as distinctive bearers of epistemic content that cannot be reduced to propositions. Remarks on the practice and function of medical illustration—specifically, images Nancy Tuana used in her discussion of the construction of ignorance of women’s sexual function (2004)—show pictures to be complex and powerful epistemic devices. Their affinity with perennial feminist concerns, the relation between epistemic subject and object, and the nature of social knowledge, are of particular interest.
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  32. Karen C. Adkins (2002). The Real Dirt: Gossip and Feminist Epistemology. Social Epistemology 16 (3):215 – 232.score: 156.0
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  33. Sharyn Clough (1998). A Hasty Retreat From Evidence: The Recalcitrance of Relativism in Feminist Epistemology. Hypatia 13 (4):88 - 111.score: 156.0
    While feminist epistemologists have made important contributions to the deconstruction of the traditional representationalist model, some elements of the Cartesian legacy remain. For example, relativism continues to play a role in the underdetermination thesis used by Longino and Keller. Both argue that because scientific theories are underdetermined by evidence, theory choice must be relative to interpretive frameworks. Utilizing Davidson's philosophy of language, I offer a nonrepresentationalist alternative to suggest how relativism can be more fully avoided.
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  34. Lisa A. Bergin (2002). Testimony, Epistemic Difference, and Privilege: How Feminist Epistemology Can Improve Our Understanding of the Communication of Knowledge. Social Epistemology 16 (3):197 – 213.score: 156.0
  35. Cassandra L. Pinnick (2000). Veritistic Epistemology and Feminist Epistemology: A-Rational Epistemics? Social Epistemology 14 (4):281 – 291.score: 156.0
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  36. Uma Narayan (1989). The Project of Feminist Epistemology: Perspectives From a Nonwestern Feminist. In Alison M. Jaggar & Susan Bordo (eds.), Gender/Body/Knowledge: Feminist Reconstructions of Being and Knowing. Rutgers University Press. 256--69.score: 156.0
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  37. Linda Martín Alcoff (2003). Gadamer's Feminist Epistemology. In Lorraine Code (ed.), Feminist Interpretations of Hans-Georg Gadamer. Pennsylvania State University Press.score: 156.0
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  38. H. E. Grasswick (2001). Forwarding the Cause of Feminist Epistemology. Social Epistemology 15 (4):388-392.score: 156.0
     
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  39. E. Heidi (2002). Grasswick, Mark Owen Webb, Feminist Epistemology as Social Epistemology. Social Epistemology 16 (3).score: 156.0
     
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  40. Rose Hilary (1986). Beyond Masculinist Realities: A Feminist Epistemology for the Science. In Ruth Bleier (ed.), Feminist Approaches to Science. Pergamon Press. 57--76.score: 156.0
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  41. Kathleen Lennon (2004). Feminist Epistemology. In. In M. Sintonen, J. Wolenski & I. Niiniluoto (eds.), Handbook of Epistemology. Kluwer. 1013--1026.score: 156.0
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  42. E. Michelson (1996). Auctoritee'andexperience': Feminist Epistemology and the Assessment of Experiential Learning. Feminist Studies 22 (3):627-655.score: 156.0
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  43. Ilkka Niiniluoto (1996). The Relativism Question in Feminist Epistemology. In. In Lynn Hankinson Nelson & Jack Nelson (eds.), Feminism, Science, and the Philosophy of Science. 139--157.score: 156.0
  44. Elizabeth Potter (2007). Feminist Epistemology and Philosophy of Science. In Linda Alcoff & Eva Feder Kittay (eds.), The Blackwell Guide to Feminist Philosophy. Blackwell Pub..score: 156.0
  45. Hilary Rose (1986). Beyond Masculinist Realities: A Feminist Epistemology for the Sciences. In Ruth Bleier (ed.), Feminist Approaches to Science. Pergamon Press. 57--76.score: 156.0
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  46. Alison M. Jaggar (1989). Love and Knowledge: Emotion in Feminist Epistemology. Inquiry 32 (2):151 – 176.score: 150.0
  47. Elizabeth Anderson (1995). Knowledge, Human Interests, and Objectivity in Feminist Epistemology. Philosophical Topics 23 (2):27-58.score: 150.0
  48. Helen E. Longino (1997). Feminist Epistemology as a Local Epistemology: Helen E. Longino. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 71 (1):19–36.score: 150.0
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  49. A. Hattiangadi (2000). Credibility@Feminist.Epistemology. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 31 (4):647-657.score: 150.0
  50. Antony Eagle, Feminist Epistemology.score: 150.0
    true (but not conversely); if someone is lucky in truly believing \x{D835}\x{DC5D}, their belief is not knowledge; if someone truly believes that \x{D835}\x{DC5D}, but cannot justify their belief with evidence, it is not knowledge; and so on.
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