Search results for 'Feminist economics' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Feminist Economics (2001). What is Objectivity? In Stephen Cullenberg, Jack Amariglio & David F. Ruccio (eds.), Postmodernism, Economics and Knowledge. Routledge. 286.score: 300.0
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  2. Deriving Methodology From Ontology & A. Decade of Feminist Economics (2005). Models Back in the Bunk. Journal of Economic Methodology 12 (4).score: 260.0
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  3. Drucilla K. Barker & Edith Kuiper (eds.) (2003). Toward a Feminist Philosophy of Economics. Routledge.score: 186.0
    Feminist economists have demonstrated that interrogating hierarchies based on gender, ethnicity, class and nation results in an economics that is biased and more faithful to empirical evidence than are mainstream accounts. This rigorous and comprehensive book examines many of the central philosophical questions and themes in feminist economics including: · History of economics · Feminist science studies · Identity and agency · Caring labor · Postcolonialism and postmodernism With contributions from such leading figures as (...)
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  4. Edith Kuiper & Jolande Sap (eds.) (1995). Out of the Margin: Feminist Perspectives on Economics. Routledge.score: 156.0
    Out of the Margin is the first book to consider feminist concerns across the whole domain of economics. In recent years there has been a tremendous increase in interest on the relation between gender and economics. Feminists have found much of concern in the way the economics has written women out of its history, built its theories around masculinist values, failed to take proper account of women and their work when measuring the economy and ignored most (...)
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  5. Alice Belcher (2000). A Feminist Perspective on Contract Theories From Law and Economics. Feminist Legal Studies 8 (1):29-46.score: 150.0
    This article offers a feminist perspective on contract theories in law,economics and law-and-economics. It identifies masculine traits presentcontract theories in all three disciplines. It then describes andassesses some developments that appear to be ‘feminising’: Therecognition of the importance of social norms in contract theory andtheories of contract as relationship. The article's main claim is that amasculine model of decision-making persists even within the less overtlymasculine models of contract. The problem of sexually transmitted debtresulting from a surety contract (...)
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  6. Julie A. Nelson (2004). Clocks, Creation and Clarity: Insights on Ethics and Economics From a Feminist Perspective. [REVIEW] Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 7 (4):381 - 398.score: 144.0
    This essay discusses the origins, biases, and effects on contemporary discussions of economics and ethics of the unexamined use of the metaphor an economy is a machine. Both neoliberal economics and many critiques of capitalist systems take this metaphor as their starting point. The belief that economies run according to universal laws of motion, however, is shown to be based on a variety of rationalist thinking that – while widely held – is inadequate for explaining lived human experience. (...)
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  7. Steven Horwitz (1995). Feminist Economics: An Austrian Perspective. Journal of Economic Methodology 2 (2):259-280.score: 122.0
    This paper attempts to assess the recent literature on feminist economics from the perspective of modern Austrian economics. Feminists and Austrians share many epistemological and methodological criticisms of neoclassical theory, although Austrians have never linked those criticisms to gender. Both groups argue that the attempt to mimic the methods of the natural sciences has been a particular source of trouble for neoclassicism. The paper suggests that these common points of criticism can serve as a starting point for (...)
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  8. Martha MacDonald (1995). The Empirical Challenges of Feminist Economics. In Edith Kuiper & Jolande Sap (eds.), Out of the Margin: Feminist Perspectives on Economics. Routledge. 175--97.score: 114.0
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  9. Susan Himmelweit (2003). 16 An Evolutionary Approach to Feminist Economics. In Drucilla K. Barker & Edith Kuiper (eds.), Toward a Feminist Philosophy of Economics. Routledge. 247.score: 114.0
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  10. Irene van Staveren (2003). 4 Feminist Fiction and Feminist Economics. In Drucilla K. Barker & Edith Kuiper (eds.), Toward a Feminist Philosophy of Economics. Routledge.score: 114.0
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  11. Eiman Zein-Elabdin (2003). 20 The Difficulty of a Feminist Economics'. In Drucilla K. Barker & Edith Kuiper (eds.), Toward a Feminist Philosophy of Economics. Routledge. 321.score: 114.0
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  12. Julie A. Nelson, Economists, Value Judgments, and Climate Change: A View From Feminist Economics.score: 102.0
    A number of recent discussions about ethical issues in climate change, as engaged in by economists, have focused on the value of the parameter representing the rate of time preference within models of optimal growth. This essay examines many economists' antipathy to serious discussion of ethical matters, and suggests that the avoidance of questions of intergenerational equity is related to another set of value judgments concerning the quality and objectivity of economic practice. Using insights from feminist philosophy of science (...)
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  13. Drucilla K. Barker (2004). 11 From Feminist Empiricism to Feminist Poststructuralism: Philosophical Questions in Feminist Economics. In John Bryan Davis & Alain Marciano (eds.), The Elgar Companion to Economics and Philosophy. Edward Elgar Pub.. 213.score: 96.0
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  14. Joyce RJacohien (2003). Some Implications of the Feminist Project in Economics for Empirical Methodology1. In Drucilla K. Barker & Edith Kuiper (eds.), Toward a Feminist Philosophy of Economics. Routledge. 89.score: 96.0
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  15. Ingrid Robeyns (2005). A Decade of Feminist Economics. Journal of Economic Methodology 12 (4):613-617.score: 92.0
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  16. Susan Hawthorne (2002). Wild Politics: Feminism, Globalisation, Bio/Diversity. Spinifex.score: 84.0
    The personal and the political, the local and the global—divergent perspectives are synthesized in this visionary examination of globalization and how it affects individual lives. Personal stories of urban and rural living reveal the many varieties of experience and how Western culture has created both immense wealth and poverty. Discussions of primary production, neoclassical economics, and international trade agreements accompany writing about nature and how rural life is deeply connected to land.
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  17. Kristina Rolin (2012). Feminist Philosophy of Economics. In Uskali Mäki, Dov M. Gabbay, Paul Thagard & John Woods (eds.), Philosophy of Economics. North Holland. 199.score: 78.0
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  18. Julie A. Nelson (2001). Value as Relationality: Feminist, Pragmatist, and Process Thought Meet Economics. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 15 (2):137-151.score: 72.0
  19. Ann E. Cudd (1995). Beyond Economic Man: Feminist Theory and Economics. History of European Ideas 21 (1):137-138.score: 72.0
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  20. Barbara E. Hopkins (1995). A Feminist Redefinition of Privatization and Economic Reform. In Edith Kuiper & Jolande Sap (eds.), Out of the Margin: Feminist Perspectives on Economics. Routledge. 181.score: 60.0
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  21. Deborah Walker, Jerry W. Dauterive, Elyssa Schultz & Walter Block (2004). The Feminist Competition/Cooperation Dichotomy. Journal of Business Ethics 55 (3):243 - 254.score: 54.0
    Feminist literature sometimes posits that competition and cooperation are opposites. This dichotomy is important in that it is often invoked in order to explain why mainstream economics has focused on market activity to the exclusion of non-market activity, and why this fascination or focus is sexist. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate that the competition/cooperation dichotomy is false. Once the dichotomy is dissolved, those activities which are seen as competitive (masculine) and those which are seen as (...)
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  22. Abigail J. Stewart (ed.) (2001). Theorizing Feminism: Parallel Trends in the Humanities and Social Sciences. Westview Press.score: 54.0
    In the past three decades, feminist scholars have produced an extraordinary rich body of theoretical writing in humanities and social science disciplines. This revised and updated second edition of Theorizing Feminism: Parallel Trends in the Humanities and Social Sciences, is a genuinely interdisciplinary anthology of significant contributions to feminist theory.This timely reader is creatively edited, and contains insightful introductory material. It illuminates the historical development of feminist theory as well as the current state of the field. Emphasizing (...)
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  23. Anne Herrmann & Abigail J. Stewart (eds.) (1994). Theorizing Feminism: Parallel Trends in the Humanities and Social Sciences. Westview Press.score: 54.0
    In the past two decades, feminist scholars have produced an abundance of theoretical writing in humanities and social science disciplines. The result is a body of work that is extraordinarily rich, hard to keep up with, and extremely difficult to teach.With the appearance of Theorizing Feminism: Parallel Trends in the Humanities and Social Sciences, the first genuinely interdisciplinary anthology of significant contributions to feminist theory, teachers will finally have a volume that does justice to their topic. Creatively edited, (...)
     
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  24. Alison Jaggar & Scott Wisor (2013). Feminist Methodology in Practice: Lessons From a Research Program. In , Just Methods: An Interdisciplinary Reader. Paradigm.score: 54.0
    This article reflects critically on the methodology of one feminist research project which is ongoing as we write. The project is titled “Assessing Development: Designing Better Indices of Poverty and Gender Equity” and its aim is to develop a better standard or metric for measuring poverty across the world. The authors of this article are among several philosophers on the research team, which also includes scholars from the disciplines of anthropology, sociology and economics. This article begin by explaining (...)
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  25. David Howarth (2000). On the Question, “What is Law?”. Res Publica 6 (3):259-283.score: 48.0
    Re-framing discussion of the question, “What is law?“ in terms of the contexts in which the whole question makes sense allows us to see that jurisprudence is about boundary disputes concerning law – that is about what should count as law – and about responses to attacks on the value of law. Concern for these two issues constitutes the boundary challenge perspective. The boundary challenge perspective not only allows us fully to escape essentialism about law, it also provides us with (...)
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  26. Wendy Olsen (2007). Pluralist Methodology for Development Economics: The Example of Moral Economy of Indian Labour Markets. Journal of Economic Methodology 14 (1):57-82.score: 44.0
    This paper adds a moral angle to the pluralist approach to development economics, exploring the normative assumptions found in all the five main schools of thought that have analysed India's rural labour markets (neoclassical, new institutionalist, Marxist political economy, formalized political economy and feminist). The theorizations that are used by each have normative overtones, which are distinguished here from normative undertones (i.e. elements of meaning that have an affect component). Regression analysis in this literature is used to illustrate (...)
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  27. Julie A. Nelson, Sociology, Economics, and Gender: Can Knowledge of the Past Contribute to a Better Future?score: 42.0
    This essay explores the profoundly gendered nature of the split between the disciplines of economics and sociology which took place in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, emphasizing implications for the relatively new field of economic sociology. Drawing on historical documents and feminist studies of science, it investigates the gendered processes underlying the divergence of the disciplines in definition, method, and degree of engagement with social problems. Economic sociology has the potential to heal this disciplinary split, but (...)
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  28. Brian P. Cooper (2003). 11 Social Classifications, Social Statistics, and the “Facts” of “Difference” in Economics. In Drucilla K. Barker & Edith Kuiper (eds.), Toward a Feminist Philosophy of Economics. Routledge. 161.score: 42.0
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  29. Farrell & James P. Sterba (2008). Does Feminism Discriminate Against Men?: A Debate. OUP USA.score: 42.0
    Does feminism give a much-needed voice to women in a patriarchal world? Or is the world not really patriarchal? Has feminism begun to level the playing field in a world in which women are more often paid less at work and abused at home? Or are women paid equally for the same work and not abused more at home? Does feminism support equality in education and in the military, or does it discriminate against men by ignoring such issues as male-only (...)
     
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  30. Susan F. Feiner (2003). 12 Reading Neoclassical Economics. In Drucilla K. Barker & Edith Kuiper (eds.), Toward a Feminist Philosophy of Economics. Routledge. 180.score: 42.0
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  31. Susan F. Feiner (1995). Reading Neoclassical Economics'. In Edith Kuiper & Jolande Sap (eds.), Out of the Margin: Feminist Perspectives on Economics. Routledge. 153.score: 42.0
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  32. Lee Levin (1995). Toward a Feminist, Post-Keynesian Theory of Investment. In Edith Kuiper & Jolande Sap (eds.), Out of the Margin: Feminist Perspectives on Economics. Routledge.score: 42.0
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  33. Solomon W. Polachek (1995). Human Capital and the Gender Earnings Gap: A Response to Feminist Critiques. In Edith Kuiper & Jolande Sap (eds.), Out of the Margin: Feminist Perspectives on Economics. Routledge. 61--79.score: 42.0
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  34. Marilyn Power, Ellen Mutari & Deborah M. Figart (2003). Beyond Markets. Wage Setting and the Methodology of Feminist Political Economy. In Drucilla K. Barker & Edith Kuiper (eds.), Toward a Feminist Philosophy of Economics. Routledge. 17--34.score: 42.0
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  35. Iulie Aslaksen (2002). Gender Constructions and the Possibility of a Generous Economic Actor. Hypatia 17 (2):118-132.score: 36.0
    : In this paper I discuss various approaches to human motivation, considering how the image of economic actors as motivated by narrow self-interest and greed may be changed to one of self-interest combined with generosity and social responsibility. I draw inspiration from feminist economics as well as from psychological, anthropological and mythological material. As an example, I consider the role of self-interest and generosity as motivating forces for ethical investment.
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  36. Janice Richardson (2007). On Not Making Ourselves the Prey of Others: Jean Hampton's Feminist Contractarianism. [REVIEW] Feminist Legal Studies 15 (1):33-55.score: 34.0
    This article assesses Jean Hampton’s feminist contractarianism by considering the way in which she draws together the contradictory positions of Hobbes and Kant to produce a test for exploitation in personal relationships. The ways in which this work fits with her other analysis of retribution, gratitude and self-worth are examined. Hampton’s work is evaluated in the context of Carole Pateman’s argument that moral theories distract from the political analysis of who has a voice in relationships. Hampton’s work presumes the (...)
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  37. Claire Young & Susan Boyd (2006). Losing the Feminist Voice? Debates on The Legal Recognition of Same Sex Partnerships in Canada. Feminist Legal Studies 14 (2):213-240.score: 34.0
    Over the last decade, legal recognition of same-sex relationships in Canada has accelerated. By and large, same-sex cohabitants are now recognised in the same manner as opposite-sex cohabitants, and same-sex marriage was legalised in 2005. Without diminishing the struggle that lesbians and gay men have endured to secure this somewhat revolutionary legal recognition, this article troubles its narrative of progress. In particular, we investigate the terms on which recent legal struggles have advanced, as well as the ways in which resistance (...)
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  38. Siobhan Austen & Therese Jefferson (2006). Comparing Responses to Critical Realism. Journal of Economic Methodology 13 (2):257-282.score: 32.0
    This article is a study of the response of two heterodox schools of economic thought to ?new? philosophical ideas. Specifically, it considers the response within Post Keynesian and feminist economics to Tony Lawson's recent call for economists to pay greater attention to ontology and for economists to adopt research methods consistent with critical realism. Lawson's arguments were formally introduced to these schools over the space of a few years and continue to generate considerable discussion within their ranks. The (...)
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  39. Susan Moller Okin (2005). ‘Forty Acres and a Mule’ for Women: Rawls and Feminism. Politics, Philosophy and Economics 4 (2):233-248.score: 30.0
    This article assesses the development of Rawls’s thinking in response to a generation of feminist critique. Two principle criticisms are sustainable throughout his work: first, that the family, as a basic institution of society, must be subject to the principles of justice if its members are to be free and equal members of society; and, second, that without such social and political equality, justice as fairness is as meaningful to women as the unrealized promise of ‘Forty acres and a (...)
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  40. Lynda Lange (2009). Globalization and the Conceptual Effects of Boundaries Between Western Political Philosophy and Economic Theory. Social Philosophy Today 25:31-45.score: 30.0
    This paper analyzes the historical and cultural genealogy of the presumed separation between ethics and economic theory, taking publicly supported care for children of working mothers (or parents) as a case that illuminates problems for thinking about gender justice that arise because of these disciplinary boundaries and the particular concept of “the human individual” that is implicit in them. Care for children of working mothers is an issue that has been important in the West since the inception of “second wave” (...)
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  41. Allessandra Gillis-Drage (2010). The Number One Question About Feminism: The Third Wave and the Next Half-Century. Journal of Macrodynamic Analysis 5.score: 30.0
    From its earliest beginnings, the women’s movement has evolved into a complex enterprise combining social, political, economic and academic organizations around the globe. The move into the academic scene (women’s studies, gender studies, etc.), in the past forty or so years, has given rise to debate about the purpose of feminism: what is feminism’s raison d’etre ? Should feminism primarily be an advocate for political and social change, as it was in its early days, or should it focus on theoretical (...)
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  42. Cynthia A. Wood (2003). 19 Economic Marginalia. In Drucilla K. Barker & Edith Kuiper (eds.), Toward a Feminist Philosophy of Economics. Routledge. 304.score: 30.0
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  43. Bina Agarwal (1995). Bridging a Critical Gap in Economic Analysis and Policy1. In Edith Kuiper & Jolande Sap (eds.), Out of the Margin: Feminist Perspectives on Economics. Routledge. 192.score: 30.0
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  44. Nancy C. M. Hartsock (1998). The Feminist Standpoint Revisited and Other Essays. Westview Press.score: 30.0
    For over twenty years Nancy Hartsock has been a powerful voice in the effort to forge a feminism sophisticated and strong enough to make a difference in the real world of powerful political and economic forces. This volume collects her most important writings, offering her current thinking about this period in the development of feminist political economy and presenting an important new paper, “The Feminist Standpoint Revisited.”Central themes recur throughout the volume: in particular, the relationships between theory and (...)
     
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  45. Maren A. Jochimsen (2003). Integrating Vulnerability: On the Impact of Caring on Economic Theorizing. In Drucilla K. Barker & Edith Kuiper (eds.), Toward a Feminist Philosophy of Economics. Routledge. 231--46.score: 30.0
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  46. Nitasha Kaul (2003). The Anxious Identities We Inhabit... Post'isms and Economic Understandings. In Drucilla K. Barker & Edith Kuiper (eds.), Toward a Feminist Philosophy of Economics. Routledge. 194--210.score: 30.0
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  47. Julie A. Nelson (2003). 9 How Did “the Moral” Get Split From “the Economic”? In Drucilla K. Barker & Edith Kuiper (eds.), Toward a Feminist Philosophy of Economics. Routledge. 134.score: 30.0
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  48. Jennifer Beard (2006). The Political Economy of Desire: International Law, Development and the Nation State. Routledge-Cavendish.score: 28.0
    This book offers an intelligent and thought-provoking analysis of the genealogy of Western capitalist 'development'. Jennifer Beard departs from the common position that development and underdevelopment are conceptual outcomes of the Imperialist Era and positions the genealogy of development within early Christian writings in which the western theological concepts of sin, salvation, and redemption are expounded. In doing so, she links the early Christian writings of theologians such as Augustine and , Anselm and Abelard to the processes of modern identity (...)
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  49. Julie A. Nelson (2001). Economic Methodology and Feminist Critiques. Journal of Economic Methodology 8 (1):93-97.score: 26.0
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  50. Julie A. Nelson (2009). Ethics, Evidence and International Debt. Journal of Economic Methodology 16 (2):175-189.score: 26.0
    The assumption that contracts are largely impersonal, rational, voluntary agreements drawn up between self-interested individual agents is a convenient fiction, necessary for analysis using conventional economic methods. Papers prepared for a recent conference on ethics and international debt were shaped by just such an assumption. The adequacy of this approach is, however, challenged by evidence about who is affected by international debt, how contracts are actually made and followed, the behavior of actors in financial markets, and the motivations of scholars (...)
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