Search results for 'Feminist theory' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Linda J. Nicholson (ed.) (1997). The Second Wave: A Reader in Feminist Theory. Routledge.score: 270.0
    This volume collects many of the major essays of feminist theory of the past forty years. The essays included here are those which have made key contributions to feminist theory during this period and which have generated extensive discussion. The volume organizes these essays historically, so as to provide a sense of the major turning points in feminist theory. Beginning with those essays which have provoked widespread discussion in the early days of the second (...)
     
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  2. Chris Beasley (1999). What is Feminism?: An Introduction to Feminist Theory. Sage.score: 240.0
    So what is feminism anyway? Why are all the experts so reluctant to give us a clear definition? Is it possible to make sense of the complex and often contradictory debates? In this concise and accessible introduction to feminist theory, Chris Beasley provides clear explanations of the many types of feminism. She outlines the development of liberal, radical and Marxist//socialist feminism, and reviews the more contemporary influences of psychoanalysis, postmodernism, theories of the body, queer theory, and attends (...)
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  3. Judith Grant (1993). Fundamental Feminism: Contesting the Core Concepts of Feminist Theory. Routledge.score: 240.0
    What makes feminist theory feminist? How did so many different feminisms come to exist? In Fundamental Feminism, Judith Grant addresses these questions by offering a critical exploration of the evolution of feminist theory and the state of feminist thinking today. Grant provides a lively assessment of the major problems of contemporary feminist thought and identifies a set of common assumptions that link the wide variety of feminist theories in existence. Fundamental Feminism calls (...)
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  4. Josephine Donovan (2000). Feminist Theory: The Intellectual Traditions. Continuum.score: 240.0
    This first major study of feminist theory, which has been revised and completely reset, now takes the reader into the twenty-first century.
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  5. Amy Allen (1999). The Power of Feminist Theory: Domination, Resistance, Solidarity. Westview Press.score: 240.0
    Power is clearly a crucial concept for feminist theory. Insofar as feminists are interested in analyzing power, it is because they have an interest in understanding, critiquing, and ultimately challenging the multiple array of unjust power relations affecting women in contemporary Western societies, including sexism, racism, heterosexism, and class oppression.In The Power of Feminist Theory, Amy Allen diagnoses the inadequacies of previous feminist conceptions of power, and draws on the work of a diverse group of (...)
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  6. Carole R. McCann & Seung-Kyung Kim (eds.) (2003). Feminist Theory Reader: Local and Global Perspectives. Routledge.score: 240.0
    The "Feminist Theory Reader" provides a revolutionary new approach to anthologizing the important works in feminist theory by incorporating the voices of women ...
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  7. Mary Eagleton (ed.) (2003). A Concise Companion to Feminist Theory. Blackwell.score: 240.0
    A Concise Companion to Feminist Theory introduces readers to the broad scope of feminist theory over the past 35 years.
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  8. Chris Weedon (1999). Feminism, Theory, and the Politics of Difference. Blackwell Publishers.score: 240.0
    "Feminism, Theory and the Politics of Difference" looks at the question of difference across the full spectrum of feminist theory from liberal, radical, lesbian ...
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  9. Allison Weir (1996). Sacrificial Logics: Feminist Theory and the Critique of Identity. Routledge.score: 240.0
    Contemporary feminist theory is at an impasse: the project of reformulating concepts of self and social identity is thwarted by an association between identity and oppression and victimhood. In Sacrificial Logics, Allison Weir proposes a way out of this impasse through a concept of identity which depends on accepting difference. Weir argues that the equation of identity with repression and domination links "relational" feminists like Nancy Chodorow, who equate self-identity with the repression of connection to others, and poststructuralist (...)
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  10. Wendy K. Kolmar & Frances Bartkowski (eds.) (1999). Feminist Theory: A Reader. Mayfield Pub. Co..score: 240.0
    This comprehensive reader represents the history, intellectual breadth and diversity of feminist theory.
     
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  11. Vikki Bell (1999). Feminist Imagination: Genealogies in Feminist Theory. Sage.score: 240.0
    Reading feminist theory as a complex imaginative achievement, Feminist Imagination considers feminist commitment through the interrogation of its philosophical, political and affective connections with the past, and especially with the `race' trials of the twentieth century. The book looks at: the 'directionlessness' of contemporary feminist thought; the question of essentialism and embodiment; the racial tensions in the work of Simone de Beauvoir; the totalitarian character in Hannah Arendt; the 'mimetic Jew' and the concept of mimesis (...)
     
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  12. Judith Evans (1995). Feminist Theory Today: An Introduction to Second-Wave Feminism. Sage Publications.score: 240.0
    This authoritative and lively exploration of the theories of contemporary feminism covers all the major variants of feminist political thought from the "traditional" schools of the women's movement-particularly radical, liberal, and socialist-to today's postmodern texts. Feminist Theory Today examines the epistemological challenge from critical legal theory and postmodernist thought; the divergences within, as well as between, feminist schools; and the protests from women marginalized by the feminist movement, including those who are lesbian and those (...)
     
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  13. Sue Thornham (2000). Feminist Theory and Cultural Studies: Stories of Unsettled Relations. Arnold.score: 240.0
    Feminist theory is a central strand of cultural studies. This book explores the history of feminist cultural studies from the early work of Mary Wollstonecraft, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Virginia Woolf, Simone de Beauvoir, through the 1970s Women's Liberation Movement. It also provides a comprehensive introduction to the contemporary key approaches, theories and debates of feminist theory within cultural studies, offering a major re-mapping of the field. It will be an essential text for students taking courses (...)
     
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  14. Michèle Barrett & Anne Phillips (eds.) (1992). Destabilizing Theory: Contemporary Feminist Debates. Stanford University Press.score: 234.0
    In the past decade the central principles of western feminist theory have been dramatically challenged. many feminists have endorsed post-structuralism's rejection of essentialist theoretical categories, and have added a powerful gender dimension to contemporary critiques of modernity. Earlier 'women' have been radically undermined, and newer concerns with 'difference', 'identity', and 'power' have emerged. Destabilizing Theory explores these developments in a set of specially commissioned essays by feminist theorists. Does this change amount to a real shift within (...)
     
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  15. Rosi Braidotti (2011). Nomadic Subjects: Embodiment and Sexual Difference in Contemporary Feminist Theory. Columbia University Press.score: 234.0
    Introduction -- By way of nomadism -- Context and generations -- Sexual difference theory -- On the female feminist subject : from "she-self" to "she-other" -- Sexual difference as a nomadic political project -- Organs without bodies -- Images without imagination -- Mothers, monsters, and machines -- Discontinuous becomings : Deleuze and the becoming-woman of philosophy -- Envy and ingratitude: men in feminism -- Conclusion. Geometries of passion : a conversation.
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  16. Christine Sylvester (1994). Feminist Theory and International Relations in a Postmodern Era. Cambridge University Press.score: 224.0
    This book evaluates the major debates around which the discipline of international relations has developed in the light of contemporary feminist theories. The three debates (realist versus idealist, scientific versus traditional, modernist versus postmodernist) have been subject to feminist theorising since the earliest days of known feminist activities, with the current emphasis on feminist, empiricist standpoint and postmodernist ways of knowing. Christine Sylvester shows how feminist theorising could have affected our understanding of international relations had (...)
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  17. Sonya Andermahr (1997). A Glossary of Feminist Theory. Distributed Exclusively in the Usa by St. Martin's Press.score: 224.0
    This glossary is both an introduction to the key words of feminist critical theories and a guide to their origins. Acknowledging the variety of contemporary feminist theories, the glossary includes entries on black, post-colonial, Italian, and French feminisms, and draws on a wide range of fields including semiotics, psychoanalysis, structuralism, poststructuralism, and deconstruction.
     
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  18. Ericka Tucker (2013). Spinoza’s Hobbesian Naturalism and Its Promise for a Feminist Theory of Power. Revista Conatus - Filosofia de Spinoza 7 (13):11-23.score: 222.0
    This paper examines recent feminist work on Spinoza and identifies the elements of Spinoza’s philosophy that have been seen as promising for feminist naturalism. I argue that the elements of Spinoza’s work that feminist theorists have found so promising are precisely those concepts he derives from Hobbes. I argue that the misunderstanding of Hobbes as architect of the egoist model of human nature has effaced his contribution to Spinoza’s more praised conception of the human individual. Despite misconceptions, (...)
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  19. Sara Ahmed (1998). Differences That Matter: Feminist Theory and Postmodernism. Cambridge University Press.score: 216.0
    Differences That Matter challenges existing ways of theorising the relationship between feminism and postmodernism which ask 'is or should feminism be modern or postmodern?' Sara Ahmed suggests that postmodernism has been allowed to dictate feminist debates and calls instead for feminist theorists to speak (back) to postmodernism, rather than simply speak on (their relationship to) it. Such a 'speaking back' involves a refusal to position postmodernism as a generalisable condition of the world and requires closer readings of what (...)
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  20. Lorraine Code (1991). What Can She Know?: Feminist Theory and the Construction of Knowledge. Cornell University Press.score: 210.0
    CHAPTER ONE Is the Sex of the Knower Epistemologically Significant? The Question A question that focuses on the knower, as the title of this chapter does, ...
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  21. Brooke A. Ackerly (2000). Political Theory and Feminist Social Criticism. Cambridge University Press.score: 210.0
    In Political Theory and Feminist Social Criticism, Brooke Ackerly demonstrates the shortcomings of contemporary deliberative democratic theory, relativism and essentialism for guiding the practice of social criticism in the real, imperfect world. Drawing theoretical implications from the activism of Third World feminists who help bring to public audiences the voices of women silenced by coercion, Brooke Ackerly provides a practicable model of social criticism. She argues that feminist critics have managed to achieve in practice what other (...)
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  22. Sandra Kemp & Paola Bono (eds.) (1993). The Lonely Mirror: Italian Perspectives on Feminist Theory. Routledge.score: 210.0
    Introduction Without a leg to stand on Sandra Kemp and Paola Bono The project that became The Lonely Mirror had been to edit an international collection of ...
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  23. Robyn Bluhm, Anne Jaap Jacobson & Heidi Lene Maibom (eds.) (2012). Neurofeminism: Issues at the Intersection of Feminist Theory and Cognitive Science. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 210.0
  24. Ann E. Cudd & Robin O. Andreasen (eds.) (2005). Feminist Theory: A Philosophical Anthology. Blackwell Pub..score: 210.0
  25. Laurie Finke (1992). Feminist Theory, Women's Writing. Cornell University Press.score: 210.0
     
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  26. Ann Brooks (1997). Postfeminisms: Feminism, Cultural Theory, and Cultural Forms. Routledge.score: 210.0
    Once seen as synonymous with "anti-feminism" postfeminism is now understood as the theoretical meeting ground between feminism and anti-foundationalist movements such as postmodernism, post-structuralism and post-colonialsm. In this clear exposition of some of the major debates, theorists and practitioners, Ann Brooks shows how feminism is being redefined for the twenty first century. Individual chapters look at postfeminism in relation to feminist epistemology, Foucault, psychoanalytic theory and semiology, postmodernism and postcolonialism, cultural politics, popular culture, film and media, and sexuality (...)
     
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  27. Clare Hemmings (2011). Why Stories Matter: The Political Grammar of Feminist Theory. Duke University Press.score: 210.0
    Progress -- Loss -- Return -- Amenability -- Citation tactics -- Affective subjects.
     
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  28. Nancy J. Hirschmann & Christine Di Stefano (eds.) (1996). Revisioning the Political: Feminist Reconstructions of Traditional Concepts in Western Political Theory. Westview Press.score: 210.0
    Feminist scholars have been remaking the landscape in political theory, and in this important book some of the most important feminist political theorists provide reconstructions of those concepts most central to the tradition of political philosophy. The goal is nothing less than the construction of a blueprint for a positive feminist theory.Many of these papers are completely new; others are extensions of important earlier work; two are reprints of classic papers. The result is a progress (...)
     
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  29. Arthur Kroker & Marilouise Kroker (eds.) (1991). The Hysterical Male: New Feminist Theory. St. Martin's Press.score: 210.0
  30. Joan Nordquist (1990). French Feminist Theory: Luce Irigaray and Helene Cixous: A Bibliography. Reference and Research Services.score: 210.0
     
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  31. Joan Nordquist (1992). Feminist Theory: A Bibliography. Reference and Research Services.score: 210.0
  32. Valerie Bryson (2003). Feminist Political Theory: An Introduction. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 204.0
    Feminist Political Theory provides both a wide-ranging history of western feminist thought and a lucid analysis of contemporary debates. It offers an accessible and thought-provoking account of complex theories, which it relates to 'real-life' issues such as sexual violence, political representation and the family. This timely new edition has been thoroughly updated to incorporate the most recent developments in feminism and feminist scholarship throughout, in particular taking into account the impact of black and postmodern feminist (...)
     
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  33. Sandra G. Harding (ed.) (2004). The Feminist Standpoint Theory Reader: Intellectual and Political Controversies. Routledge.score: 204.0
    In the mid-1970s and early 1980s, several feminist theorists began developing alternatives to the traditional methods of scientific research. The result was a new theory, now recognized as Standpoint Theory, which caused heated debate and radically altered the way research is conducted. The Feminist Standpoint Theory Reader is the first anthology to collect the most important essays on the subject as well as more recent works that bring the topic up-to-date. Leading feminist scholar and (...)
     
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  34. Mary Lyndon Shanley & Uma Narayan (eds.) (1997). Reconstructing Political Theory: Feminist Perspectives. Pennsylvania State University Press.score: 204.0
    In this volume, a companion to Feminist Interpretations and Political Theory (Penn State, 1991) edited by Mary Lyndon Shanley and Carole Pateman, leading feminist theorists rethink the traditional concepts of political theory and expand the ...
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  35. Elizabeth Weed & Naomi Schor (eds.) (1997). Feminism Meets Queer Theory. Indiana University Press.score: 204.0
  36. Alia Al-Saji (2010). Bodies and Sensings: On the Uses of Husserlian Phenomenology for Feminist Theory. [REVIEW] Continental Philosophy Review 43 (1):13-37.score: 192.0
    What does Husserlian phenomenology have to offer feminist theory? More specifically, can we find resources within Husserl’s account of the living body ( Leib ) for the critical feminist project of rethinking embodiment beyond the dichotomies not only of mind/body but also of subject/object and activity/passivity? This essay begins by explicating the reasons for feminist hesitation with respect to Husserlian phenomenology. I then explore the resources that Husserl’s phenomenology of touch and his account of sensings hold (...)
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  37. Kristoffer Ahlstrom (2005). Incorporating Feminist Standpoint Theory. SATS 6 (2):79-92.score: 192.0
    As has been noted by Alvin Goldman, there are some very interesting similarities between his Veritistic Social Epistemology (VSE) and Sandra Harding's Feminist Standpoint Theory (FST). In the present paper, it is argued that these similarities are so significant as to motivate an incorporation of FST into VSE, considering that (i) a substantial common ground can be found; (ii) the claims that go beyond this common ground are logically compatible; and (iii) the generality of VSE not only does (...)
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  38. Gerald Doppelt (2002). Can Traditional Ethical Theory Meet the Challenges of Feminism, Multiculturalism, and Environmentalism? Journal of Ethics 6 (4):383-405.score: 192.0
    This paper aims to evaluate thechallenges posed to traditional ethical theoryby the ethics of feminism, multiculturalism,and environmentalism. I argue that JamesSterba, in his Three Challenges to Ethics,provides a distorted assessment by trying toassimilate feminism, multiculturalism, andenvironmentalism into traditional utilitarian,virtue, and Kantian/Rawlsian ethics – which hethus seeks to rescue from their alleged``biases.'''' In the cases of feminism andmulticulturalism, I provide an alternativeaccount on which these new critical discourseschallenge the whole paradigm or conception ofethical inquiry embodied in the tradition.They embrace different questions, (...)
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  39. Janice McLaughlin (2003). Feminist Social and Political Theory: Contemporary Debates and Dialogues. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 192.0
    This important text introduces students to both feminism and other social and political theories via an examination of the inter-relationship between different feminist positions and key contemporary debates. The book takes each debate in turn, outlines the main themes, discusses different feminist responses and evaluates the implications for real-life political and social issues. This user-friendly structure effectively redraws the map of contemporary feminist thought, offering a fresh and succinct summary of an extensive range of material and graphically (...)
     
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  40. Maya J. Goldenberg (2007). The Problem of Exclusion in Feminist Theory and Politics: A Metaphysical Investigation Into Constructing a Category of 'Woman'. Journal of Gender Studies 16 (2):139-153.score: 186.0
    The precondition of any feminist politics – a usable category of ‘woman’ – has proved to be difficult to construct, even proposed to be impossible, given the ‘problem of exclusion’. This is the inevitable exclusion of at least some women, as their lives or experiences do not fit into the necessary and sufficient condition(s) that denotes group membership. In this paper, I propose that the problem of exclusion arises not because of inappropriate category membership criteria, but because of the (...)
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  41. Beverley Skeggs (ed.) (1995). Feminist Cultural Theory: Process and Production. Distributed Exclusively in the Usa and Canada by St. Martin's Press.score: 186.0
    Introduction BEVERLEY SKEGGS By asking a group of feminist cultural theorists who have produced exemplary interdisciplinary scholarship in the to reflect ...
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  42. Nancy Tuana & Rosemarie Tong (eds.) (1995). Feminism and Philosophy: Essential Readings in Theory, Reinterpretation, and Application. Westview Press.score: 186.0
    The past twenty years have seen an explosion of work by feminist philosophers and several surveys of this work have documented the richness of the many different ways of doing feminist philosophy. But this major new anthology is the first broad and inclusive selection of the most important work in this field.There are many unanswered questions about the future of feminist philosophy. Which of the many varieties of feminist philosophy will last, and which will fade away? (...)
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  43. Debra Jackson & L. Ryan Musgrave (2005). Special Cluster on Feminist Critical Theory: Introduction. Apa Newsletter on Feminism and Philosophy 4 (2):2-3.score: 186.0
  44. Diane Richardson, Janice McLaughlin & Mark E. Casey (eds.) (2006). Intersections Between Feminist and Queer Theory. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 186.0
    The emergence of queer ideas has unsettled other forms of exploring gender and sexuality, in particular feminism. In response, feminists have been significant critics of queer ideas. This book, through the contribution of important US and UK writers, seeks to explore the debates between feminist and queer theorizing in order to seek out interconnections between the two; they identify new directions in thinking about sexuality and gender that may emerge out of and at the interface.
     
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  45. Lois McNay (2000). Gender and Agency: Reconfiguring the Subject in Feminist and Social Theory. Blackwell Publishers.score: 182.0
    This book reassesses theories of agency and gender identity against the backdrop of changing relations between men and women in contemporary societies.
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  46. Amy Allen (1999). Solidarity After Identity Politics: Hannah Arendt and the Power of Feminist Theory. Philosophy and Social Criticism 25 (1):97-118.score: 180.0
    This paper argues that Hannah Arendt's political theory offers key insights into the power that binds together the feminist movement - the power of solidarity. Second-wave feminist notions of solidarity were grounded in notions of shared identity; in recent years, as such conceptions of shared identity have come under attack for being exclusionary and repressive, feminists have been urged to give up the idea of solidarity altogether. However, the choice between (repressive) identity and (fragmented) non-identity is a (...)
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  47. Carol J. Adams (2000). The Sexual Politics of Meat: A Feminist-Vegetarian Critical Theory. Continuum.score: 180.0
    New Tenth Anniversary edition of this classic text with a new preface by the author, compares myths about meat-eating with myths about manliness, and seeks to ...
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  48. Ericka Tucker (2013). Feminist Political Theory. In Gibbons Michael (ed.), The Encyclopedia of Political Thought. New York: Wiley Blackwell. Blackwell.score: 180.0
  49. Susan Wendell (1989). Toward a Feminist Theory of Disability. Hypatia 4 (2):104 - 124.score: 180.0
    We need a feminist theory of disability, both because 16 percent of women are disabled, and because the oppression of disabled people is closely linked to the cultural oppression of the body. Disability is not a biological given; like gender, it is socially constructed from biologically reality. Our culture idealizes the body and demands that we control it. Thus, although most people will be disabled at some time in their lives, the disabled are made "the other," who symbolize (...)
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  50. Ofelia Schutte (1998). Cultural Alterity: Cross-Cultural Communication and Feminist Theory in North-South Contexts. Hypatia 13 (2):53 - 72.score: 180.0
    How to communicate with "the other" who is culturally different from oneself is one of the greatest challenges facing North-South relations. This paper builds on existential-phenomenological and poststructuralist concepts of alterity and difference to strengthen the position of Latina and other subaltern speakers in North-South dialogue. It defends a postcolonial approach to feminist theory as a basis for negotiating culturally differentiated feminist positions in this age of accelerated globalization, migration, and displacement.
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