Search results for 'Feminist theory History' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Ann-Louise Shapiro (forthcoming). Introduction: History and Feminist Theory, or Talking Back to the Beadle. History and Theory.score: 471.0
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  2. Genevieve Lloyd (ed.) (2002). Feminism and History of Philosophy. Oxford University Press.score: 420.0
    This new collection of essays by leading feminist critics highlights the fresh perspectives that feminism can offer to the discussion of past philosophers. Rather than defining itself through opposition to a "male" philosophical tradition, feminist philosophy emerges not only as an exciting new contribution to the history of philosophy, but also as a source of cultural self-understanding in the present.
     
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  3. Ericka Tucker (2013). Spinoza’s Hobbesian Naturalism and Its Promise for a Feminist Theory of Power. Revista Conatus - Filosofia de Spinoza 7 (13):11-23.score: 408.0
    This paper examines recent feminist work on Spinoza and identifies the elements of Spinoza’s philosophy that have been seen as promising for feminist naturalism. I argue that the elements of Spinoza’s work that feminist theorists have found so promising are precisely those concepts he derives from Hobbes. I argue that the misunderstanding of Hobbes as architect of the egoist model of human nature has effaced his contribution to Spinoza’s more praised conception of the human individual. Despite misconceptions, (...)
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  4. Lilli Alanen & Charlotte Witt (eds.) (2004). Feminist Reflections on the History of Philosophy. Kluwer Academic Publishers.score: 390.0
    Feminist work in the history of philosophy has come of age as an innovative field in the history of philosophy. This volume marks that accomplishment with original essays by leading feminist scholars who ask basic questions: What is distinctive of feminist work in the history of philosophy? Is there a method that is distinctive of feminist historical work? How can women philosophers be meaningfully included in the history of the discipline? Who counts (...)
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  5. Wendy K. Kolmar & Frances Bartkowski (eds.) (1999). Feminist Theory: A Reader. Mayfield Pub. Co..score: 381.0
    This comprehensive reader represents the history, intellectual breadth and diversity of feminist theory.
     
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  6. Sue Thornham (2000). Feminist Theory and Cultural Studies: Stories of Unsettled Relations. Arnold.score: 381.0
    Feminist theory is a central strand of cultural studies. This book explores the history of feminist cultural studies from the early work of Mary Wollstonecraft, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Virginia Woolf, Simone de Beauvoir, through the 1970s Women's Liberation Movement. It also provides a comprehensive introduction to the contemporary key approaches, theories and debates of feminist theory within cultural studies, offering a major re-mapping of the field. It will be an essential text for students taking (...)
     
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  7. Ericka Tucker (2013). Feminist Political Theory. In Gibbons Michael (ed.), The Encyclopedia of Political Thought. New York: Wiley Blackwell. Blackwell.score: 354.0
  8. Andrea Nye (1990). Words of Power: A Feminist Reading of the History of Logic. Routledge.score: 354.0
    Is logic masculine? Is women's lack of interest in the "hard core" philosophical disciplines of formal logic and semantics symptomatic of an inadequacy linked to sex? Is the failure of women to excel in pure mathematics and mathematical science a function of their inability to think rationally? Andrea Nye undermines the assumptions that inform these questions, assumptions such as: logic is unitary, logic is independenet of concrete human relations, and logic transcends historical circumstances as well as gender. In a series (...)
     
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  9. Valerie Bryson (2003). Feminist Political Theory: An Introduction. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 345.0
    Feminist Political Theory provides both a wide-ranging history of western feminist thought and a lucid analysis of contemporary debates. It offers an accessible and thought-provoking account of complex theories, which it relates to 'real-life' issues such as sexual violence, political representation and the family. This timely new edition has been thoroughly updated to incorporate the most recent developments in feminism and feminist scholarship throughout, in particular taking into account the impact of black and postmodern (...) thought on feminist political theory. (shrink)
     
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  10. Beth A. Boehm (1992). Review: Feminist Histories: Theory Meets Practice. [REVIEW] Hypatia 7 (2):202 - 214.score: 342.0
    Fox-Genovese, Kaminer, and Riley all write the history of feminism as a history of conflict between feminists who desire to deny difference in favor of equality and those who desire to celebrate difference. And they all ask what this contradiction lying at the heart of feminist theory implies for the practice of feminist politics. These works reveal the need for feminists who engage this debate to be self-conscious in their formulations.
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  11. Helene Bowen Raddeker (2007). Sceptical History: Feminist and Postmodern Approaches in Practice. Routledge.score: 333.0
    A highly original work in history and theory, this survey considers major themes including identity, class and sexual difference, weaves them into debates on the nature and point of history, and arrives at new ways of doing history that – very unusually – consider non-Western history and feminist approaches. Using wide range of historical and cultural contexts, the study draws extensively on feminist scholarship, both feminist history and postcolonial feminism.
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  12. Penelope Deutscher (1997). Yielding Gender: Feminism, Deconstruction, and the History of Philosophy. Routledge.score: 300.0
    Yielding Gender explores and reconsiders the tensions that deconstruction poses for feminist philosophy. Emphasizing the important role of deconstruction in revealing the ambiguity and unstable nature of gender, Penelope Deutscher asks the crucial question: does the very instability of gender mean that we can no longer talk of a man or a woman of reason in the history of philosophy? Using the work of Judith Butler, Jacques Derrida and Luce Irigaray, Deutscher explores this question by examining the issue (...)
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  13. Daniel Whistler (2014). Howie's Between Feminism and Materialism and the Critical History of Religions. Sophia 53 (2):183-192.score: 279.0
    This essay traces the notion of abstraction through the works of Gillian Howie as a means of thinking through the nature of critique within philosophy of religion. In particular, it argues that Howie’s recovery of a more productive conception of abstraction in her late Between Feminism and Materialism is closely linked to the resurgence of real abstraction in recent Marxist theory. From these shifts, one can derive both an enriched conception of religion as real abstraction and a method of (...)
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  14. Jan Campbell (2000). Arguing with the Phallus: Feminist, Queer, and Postcolonial Theory: A Psychoanalytic Contribution. Distributed in the Usa Exclusively by St. Martin's Press.score: 279.0
    What can psychoanalysis offer contemporary arguments in the fields of Feminism, Queer Theory and Post-Colonialism? Jan Campbell introduces and analyses the way that psychoanalysis has developed and made problematic models of subjectivity linked to issues of sexuality, ethnicity, gender, and history. Via discussions of such influential and diverse figures as Lacan, Irigaray, Kristeva, Dollimore, Bhabha, Toni Morrison, and Alice Walker, Campbell uses psychoanalysis as a mediatory tool in a range of debates across the human sciences, while also arguing (...)
     
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  15. Shira Tarrant (2006). When Sex Became Gender. Routledge.score: 267.0
    This book is a study of post World War II feminist theory from the viewpoint of intellectual history. The key theme is that the social construction of gender has its origins in the feminist theorists of this period. This paradigm is a key foundational element to both second and third wave feminist thought. It will focus on the five key scholars of the period: Komarovsky, de Beauvoir, Mead, Klein and Herschberger. This has been a somewhat (...)
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  16. Imelda Whelehan (1995). Modern Feminist Thought: From the Second Wave to "Post-Feminism". New York University Press.score: 261.0
    From the historical roots of second-wave feminism to current debates about feminist theory and politics. This introduction to Anglo-American feminist thought provides a critical and panoramic survey of dominant trends in feminism since 1968. Feminism is too often considered a monolithic movement, consisting of an enormous range of women and ideologies, with both similar and different perspectives and approaches. The book is divided into two parts, the first of which takes a close look at the most influential (...)
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  17. Jim Jose (2004). No More Like Pallas Athena: Displacing Patrilineal Accounts of Modern Feminist Political Theory. Hypatia 19 (4):1-22.score: 261.0
    : The history of modern feminist political theories is often framed in terms of the already existing theories of a number of radical nineteenth-century men philosophers such as James Mill, John Stuart Mill, Charles Fourier, Karl Marx, and Friedrich Engels. My argument takes issue with this way of framing feminist political theory by demonstrating that it rests on a derivation that remains squarely within the logic of malestream political theory. Each of these philosophers made use (...)
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  18. Steven M. Cahn & Peter J. Markie (eds.) (2009). Ethics: History, Theory, and, Contemporary Issues. Oxford University Press.score: 261.0
    The most comprehensive collection of its kind, Ethics: History, Theory, and Contemporary Issues, Third Edition, is organized into three parts, providing instructors with flexibility in designing and teaching a variety of courses in moral philosophy. The first part, Historical Sources, moves from classical thought (Plato, Aristotle, Epicurus, and Epictetus) through medieval views (Augustine and Aquinas) to modern theories (Hobbes, Butler, Hume, Kant, Bentham, and Mill), culminating with leading nineteenth- and twentieth-century thinkers (Nietzsche, James, Dewey, Camus, and Sartre). The (...)
     
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  19. Kathleen Canning (forthcoming). Feminist History After the Linguistic Turn: Historicizing Discourse and Experience. History and Theory: Feminist Research, Debates, Contestations.score: 261.0
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  20. Linda J. Nicholson (ed.) (1997). The Second Wave: A Reader in Feminist Theory. Routledge.score: 252.0
    This volume collects many of the major essays of feminist theory of the past forty years. The essays included here are those which have made key contributions to feminist theory during this period and which have generated extensive discussion. The volume organizes these essays historically, so as to provide a sense of the major turning points in feminist theory. Beginning with those essays which have provoked widespread discussion in the early days of the second (...)
     
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  21. Regina Morantz-Sanchez (forthcoming). Feminist Theory and Historical Practice: Rereading Elizabeth Blackwell. History and Theory.score: 246.0
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  22. Louise M. Antony & Charlotte Witt (eds.) (2002). A Mind of One's Own: Feminist Essays on Reason and Objectivity. Westview Press.score: 228.0
    A book of tremendous influence when it first appeared, A Mind of One's Own reminded readers that the tradition of Western philosophy-- in particular, the ideals of reason and objectivity-- has come down to us from white males, nearly all of whom are demonstrably sexist, even misogynist. In this second edition, the original authors continue to ask, What are the implications of this fact for contemporary feminists working within this tradition? The second edition pursues this question about the value of (...)
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  23. Michèle Barrett & Anne Phillips (eds.) (1992). Destabilizing Theory: Contemporary Feminist Debates. Stanford University Press.score: 228.0
    In the past decade the central principles of western feminist theory have been dramatically challenged. many feminists have endorsed post-structuralism's rejection of essentialist theoretical categories, and have added a powerful gender dimension to contemporary critiques of modernity. Earlier 'women' have been radically undermined, and newer concerns with 'difference', 'identity', and 'power' have emerged. Destabilizing Theory explores these developments in a set of specially commissioned essays by feminist theorists. Does this change amount to a real shift within (...)
     
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  24. Mary Evans (ed.) (2001/2003). Feminism: Critical Concepts in Literary and Cultural Studies. Routledge.score: 228.0
    This set reprints a wide range of key articles exploring the role of feminists in the development of post-Enlightenment thought. Including groundbreaking work from the 1970s, 1980s and 1990s, with pieces by Sandra Harding, Julia Kristeva, Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak, Elizabeth Spelman, and other internationally-esteemed scholars, the collection features an original introduction and comprehensive index, making this an invaluable resource for women's studies students in a wide range of subject areas. For a full listing of contents, visit www.routledge-ny.com and type the (...)
     
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  25. Catherine Villanueva Gardner (2006). Historical Dictionary of Feminist Philosophy. Scarecrow Press.score: 225.0
  26. Chris Beasley (1999). What is Feminism?: An Introduction to Feminist Theory. Sage.score: 224.0
    So what is feminism anyway? Why are all the experts so reluctant to give us a clear definition? Is it possible to make sense of the complex and often contradictory debates? In this concise and accessible introduction to feminist theory, Chris Beasley provides clear explanations of the many types of feminism. She outlines the development of liberal, radical and Marxist//socialist feminism, and reviews the more contemporary influences of psychoanalysis, postmodernism, theories of the body, queer theory, and attends (...)
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  27. Judith Grant (1993). Fundamental Feminism: Contesting the Core Concepts of Feminist Theory. Routledge.score: 224.0
    What makes feminist theory feminist? How did so many different feminisms come to exist? In Fundamental Feminism, Judith Grant addresses these questions by offering a critical exploration of the evolution of feminist theory and the state of feminist thinking today. Grant provides a lively assessment of the major problems of contemporary feminist thought and identifies a set of common assumptions that link the wide variety of feminist theories in existence. Fundamental Feminism calls (...)
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  28. Josephine Donovan (2000). Feminist Theory: The Intellectual Traditions. Continuum.score: 224.0
    This first major study of feminist theory, which has been revised and completely reset, now takes the reader into the twenty-first century.
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  29. Amy Allen (1999). The Power of Feminist Theory: Domination, Resistance, Solidarity. Westview Press.score: 224.0
    Power is clearly a crucial concept for feminist theory. Insofar as feminists are interested in analyzing power, it is because they have an interest in understanding, critiquing, and ultimately challenging the multiple array of unjust power relations affecting women in contemporary Western societies, including sexism, racism, heterosexism, and class oppression.In The Power of Feminist Theory, Amy Allen diagnoses the inadequacies of previous feminist conceptions of power, and draws on the work of a diverse group of (...)
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  30. Carole R. McCann & Seung-Kyung Kim (eds.) (2003). Feminist Theory Reader: Local and Global Perspectives. Routledge.score: 224.0
    The "Feminist Theory Reader" provides a revolutionary new approach to anthologizing the important works in feminist theory by incorporating the voices of women ...
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  31. Mary Eagleton (ed.) (2003). A Concise Companion to Feminist Theory. Blackwell.score: 224.0
    A Concise Companion to Feminist Theory introduces readers to the broad scope of feminist theory over the past 35 years.
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  32. Chris Weedon (1999). Feminism, Theory, and the Politics of Difference. Blackwell Publishers.score: 224.0
    "Feminism, Theory and the Politics of Difference" looks at the question of difference across the full spectrum of feminist theory from liberal, radical, lesbian ...
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  33. Allison Weir (1996). Sacrificial Logics: Feminist Theory and the Critique of Identity. Routledge.score: 224.0
    Contemporary feminist theory is at an impasse: the project of reformulating concepts of self and social identity is thwarted by an association between identity and oppression and victimhood. In Sacrificial Logics, Allison Weir proposes a way out of this impasse through a concept of identity which depends on accepting difference. Weir argues that the equation of identity with repression and domination links "relational" feminists like Nancy Chodorow, who equate self-identity with the repression of connection to others, and poststructuralist (...)
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  34. Vikki Bell (1999). Feminist Imagination: Genealogies in Feminist Theory. Sage.score: 224.0
    Reading feminist theory as a complex imaginative achievement, Feminist Imagination considers feminist commitment through the interrogation of its philosophical, political and affective connections with the past, and especially with the `race' trials of the twentieth century. The book looks at: the 'directionlessness' of contemporary feminist thought; the question of essentialism and embodiment; the racial tensions in the work of Simone de Beauvoir; the totalitarian character in Hannah Arendt; the 'mimetic Jew' and the concept of mimesis (...)
     
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  35. Judith Evans (1995). Feminist Theory Today: An Introduction to Second-Wave Feminism. Sage Publications.score: 224.0
    This authoritative and lively exploration of the theories of contemporary feminism covers all the major variants of feminist political thought from the "traditional" schools of the women's movement-particularly radical, liberal, and socialist-to today's postmodern texts. Feminist Theory Today examines the epistemological challenge from critical legal theory and postmodernist thought; the divergences within, as well as between, feminist schools; and the protests from women marginalized by the feminist movement, including those who are lesbian and those (...)
     
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  36. Elsa Barkley Brown (1997). 'What Has Happened Here': The Politics of Difference in Women's History and Feminist Politics. In Linda J. Nicholson (ed.), The Second Wave: A Reader in Feminist Theory. Routledge.score: 222.0
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  37. Rosi Braidotti (2011). Nomadic Subjects: Embodiment and Sexual Difference in Contemporary Feminist Theory. Columbia University Press.score: 220.0
    Introduction -- By way of nomadism -- Context and generations -- Sexual difference theory -- On the female feminist subject : from "she-self" to "she-other" -- Sexual difference as a nomadic political project -- Organs without bodies -- Images without imagination -- Mothers, monsters, and machines -- Discontinuous becomings : Deleuze and the becoming-woman of philosophy -- Envy and ingratitude: men in feminism -- Conclusion. Geometries of passion : a conversation.
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  38. Jane Duran (2001). Worlds of Knowing: Global Feminist Epistemologies. Routledge.score: 219.0
    Jane Duran's Worlds of Knowing begins to fill an enormous gap in the literature of feminist epistemology: a wide-ranging, cross-cultural primer on worldviews and epistemologies of various cultures and their appropriations by indigenous feminist movements in those cultures. It is the much needed epistemological counterpart to work on cross-cultural feminist social and political philosophy. This project is absolutely breath-taking in scope, yet a manageable read for anyone with some background in feminist theory, history, or (...)
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  39. Linda Singer (1992). Erotic Welfare: Sexual Theory and Politics in the Age of Epidemic. Routledge.score: 219.0
    A trenchant critique of sexuality in an age of discipline, where bodies and pleasures have become sites of regulatory power.
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  40. Seyla Benhabib (1993). Feminist Theory and Hannah Arendt's Concept of Public Space. History of the Human Sciences 6 (2):97-114.score: 219.0
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  41. Joyce Senders Pedersen (1987). Education, Gender and Social Change in Victorian Liberal Feminist Theory. History of European Ideas 8 (4-5):503-519.score: 219.0
  42. Ann E. Cudd (1995). Beyond Economic Man: Feminist Theory and Economics. History of European Ideas 21 (1):137-138.score: 219.0
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  43. Alice E. Adams & Ann Dally (1997). Reproducing the Womb: Images of Childbirth in Science, Feminist Theory, and Literature. History of Science 35:113-114.score: 219.0
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  44. Andrea Nye (2004). Feminism and Modern Philosophy: An Introduction. Routledge.score: 216.0
    The history of modern philosophy is a major topic in philosophy and is crucial to an understanding of the advent of feminist philosophy. Feminism and Modern Philosophy introduces fundamental topics in modern philosophy from a feminist perspective. It takes the student through the subject step by step by looking at the main thinkers most usually examined on a course in modern philosophy and by examining the role of gender in studying classic philosophical texts. The book covers the (...)
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  45. Dena Goodman (1997). More Than Paradoxes to Offer: Feminist History as Critical Practice. History and Theory 36 (3):392–405.score: 216.0
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  46. Philip J. Kain (1993). Marx and Modern Political Theory: From Hobbes to Contemporary Feminism. Rowman & Littlefield.score: 216.0
    Hegel,. the. State,. and. Spirit. Hegel's political thought can best be understood if we understand its relationship to Rousseau's political theory and Kant's philosophy of history. In the first place, Hegel's conception of the modern state closely ...
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  47. Evelyn Fox Keller & Helen E. Longino (eds.) (1996). Feminism and Science. Oxford University Press.score: 216.0
    (Series copy) The new Oxford Readings in Feminism series maps the dramatic influence of feminist theory on every branch of academic knowledge. Offering feminist perspectives on disciplines from history to science, each book assembles the most important articles written on its field in the last ten to fifteen years. Old stereotypes are challenged and traditional attitudes upset in these lively-- and sometimes controversial--volumes, all of which are edited by feminists prominent in their particular field. Comprehensive, accessible, (...)
     
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  48. Beryl Satter (2006). Writing Gender History: What Does Feminism Have to Do with It? History and Theory 45 (3):436–447.score: 216.0
  49. Joan B. Landes (ed.) (1998). Feminism, the Public and the Private. Oxford University Press.score: 216.0
    This latest volume in the Oxford Readings in Feminism series presents the results of the multi-disciplinary feminist exploration of the distinction between public and private. Contributors demonstrate the significance of the distinction in feminist theory, its articulation in the modern and late modern public sphere, and its impact on identity politics within feminism in recent years. Feminism, the Public and the Private offers an essential perspective on feminist theory for students and teachers of women's and (...)
     
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  50. Abigail J. Stewart (ed.) (2001). Theorizing Feminism: Parallel Trends in the Humanities and Social Sciences. Westview Press.score: 216.0
    In the past three decades, feminist scholars have produced an extraordinary rich body of theoretical writing in humanities and social science disciplines. This revised and updated second edition of Theorizing Feminism: Parallel Trends in the Humanities and Social Sciences, is a genuinely interdisciplinary anthology of significant contributions to feminist theory.This timely reader is creatively edited, and contains insightful introductory material. It illuminates the historical development of feminist theory as well as the current state of the (...)
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