Search results for 'Fertilization in Vitro legislation' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Edward W. Keyserlingk (1981). Artificial Insemination and in Vitro Fertilization. Bioethics Quarterly 3 (1):35-49.score: 513.0
    This paper explores some of the ethical (and legal) implications of artificial insemination and in vitro fertilization. In both cases the emphasis is on the interests of the potential child. It concludes that in neither case is great optimism or great pessimism appropriate. About AID, much of the legal and ethical concern has been other than child-centered, and has focused mainly on the interests of parents and donors. Three aspects expecially remain troubling: donor selection, record-keeping and disclosure and (...)
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  2. L. Perla (2001). Is In-Vitro Fertilization for Older Women Ethical? A Personal Perspective. Nursing Ethics 8 (2):152-158.score: 513.0
    Fertility treatments raise a range of social and ethical issues regarding self-identity for family, sexual intimacy, and the interests and welfare of potential children. Eggs and sperm are combined to produce fertilized eggs. These eggs are then implanted as embryos and grow into viable fetuses, which are carried by the original mother or a surrogate mother. This artificial form of conception can challenge religious values and family structures. In-vitro fertilization (IVF) can be considered either as a medical miracle (...)
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  3. Judith Lorber (1989). Choice, Gift, or Patriarchal Bargain? Women's Consent to in Vitro Fertilization in Male Infertility. Hypatia 4 (3):23 - 36.score: 513.0
    This paper explores the reasons why women who are themselves fertile might consent to undergo in vitro fertilization (IVF) with an infertile male partner. The reasons often given are desire to have that particular man's child, or altruism, giving a gift to the partner. Although ethically, the decision should be completely woman's prerogative, because IVF programs usually treat the couple as a unit, she may be offered few other options by the medical staff. In social terms, whether the (...)
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  4. Uwe Koerner (1989). Policy Positions on in Vitro Fertilization and Embryo Transfer in Human Individuals (German Democratic Republic, 1985). Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 14 (3):355-358.score: 513.0
    Recommandations have been formulated in 1985 with reference to socialist morality and law and as a result of interdisciplinary discussion by the IAME (Interdisciplinary Working Party on Medical Ethics at the GDR Academy of Postgraduate Medical Education) for clinical application of in vitro fertilization and for the use of human oocytes and early embryonic stages.
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  5. Aaron L. Mackler (1997). An Expanded Partnership with God? In Vitro Fertilization in Jewish Ethics. Journal of Religious Ethics 25 (2):277 - 304.score: 513.0
    Judaism has understood procreation as representing a partnership between God and humans, calling for both human reverence and action. The development of in vitro fertilization raises questions about the implications of this partnership and applications of this technology. A holistic approach to Jewish ethics, drawing on traditional sources, suggests that it can be appropriate for an infertile couple to utilize IVF using their own sperm and egg to have a child. The use of donated sperm, eggs, and embryos (...)
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  6. C. Richie (2012). Applying Catholic Responsibility to In Vitro Fertilization: Obligations to the Spouse, the Body, and the Common Good. Christian Bioethics 18 (3):271-286.score: 513.0
    After the typical theological and bioethical questions about in vitro fertilization (IVF) are vetted, there remains a three-dimensional understanding of responsibility that is not typically considered in Christian bioethics. This paper will explore responsibility to the spouses’ loving union, their bodies, and society in order to ascertain the morality of IVF. In a marriage partnership, the spouses’ primary responsibility is to each other. Although in matrimony physical union is essential to marriage, children are not. The second dimension of (...)
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  7. John Harris (1983). In Vitro Fertilization: The Ethical Issues (I). Philosophical Quarterly 33 (132):217-237.score: 468.0
    In vitro embryology not only makes possible the growing of human tissue to remedy infertility but also for many other experimental purposes. This paper examines the ethical issues involved in such work and outlines the circumstances in which such work is morally permissible and those in which it is not.
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  8. Prudence Talbot (1983). Fertilization in Vitro In Vitro Fertilization and Embryo Transfer E. S. E. Hafez K. Semm. Bioscience 33 (9):600-600.score: 438.8
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  9. Richard M. Hare (forthcoming). In Vitro Fertilization and the Warnock Report. Essays in Bioethics, Clarendon, Oxford.score: 436.5
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  10. Laura Purdy (2013). In Vitro Fertilization Should Be an Option for Women. In Arthur L. Caplan & Robert Arp (eds.), Contemporary Debates in Bioethics. John Wiley and Sons.score: 436.5
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  11. Suzanne Uniacke (1987). In Vitro Fertilization and the Right to Reproduce. Bioethics 1 (3):241–254.score: 427.5
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  12. Mary Warnock (1983). In Vitro Fertilization: The Ethical Issues (II). Philosophical Quarterly 33 (132):238-249.score: 427.5
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  13. Bruce N. Waller (1995). Abortion and in Vitro Fertilization. Journal of Social Philosophy 26 (1):119-128.score: 427.5
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  14. Christine Overall (1991). Access to In Vitro Fertilization: Costs, Care and Consent. Dialogue 30 (03):383-397.score: 427.5
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  15. Lisa Handwerker (1995). Social and Ethical Implications of In Vitro Fertilization in Contemporary China. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 4 (03):355-.score: 427.5
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  16. Urban Wiesing (1993). In Vitro Fertilization: Regulations in Germany. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 2 (03):321-.score: 427.5
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  17. Linda LeMoncheck (1996). Philosophy, Gender Politics, and in Vitro Fertilization: A Feminist Ethics of Reproductive Healthcare. Journal of Clinical Ethics 7 (2):160.score: 427.5
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  18. A. E. Hinkley (2012). In Vitro Fertilization, Double Effect, and Stem Cell Research: An Introduction. Christian Bioethics 18 (3):231-234.score: 427.5
  19. Richard A. McCormick (1979). The EAB and In Vitro Fertilization. Hastings Center Report 9 (6):4-4.score: 427.5
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  20. Jan Tesarik & Carmen Mendoza (1999). In Vitro Fertilization by Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection. Bioessays 21 (9):791-801.score: 427.5
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  21. Robin Marantz Henig (1978). In Vitro Fertilization: A Cautious Move Ahead. Bioscience 28 (11):685-688.score: 427.5
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  22. Frank H. Marsh & Donnie J. Self (1980). In Vitro Fertilization: Moving From Theory to Therapy. Hastings Center Report 10 (3):5-6.score: 427.5
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  23. Kevin D. O'Rourke (2010). Catholic Principles and In Vitro Fertilization. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 10 (4):709-722.score: 427.5
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  24. John A. Robertson & Theodore J. Schneyer (1997). Professional Self-Regulation and Shared-Risk Programs for In Vitro Fertilization. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 25 (4):283-291.score: 427.5
  25. Stephen Toulmin (1978). In Vitro Fertilization: Answering the Ethical Objections. Hastings Center Report 8 (5):9-11.score: 427.5
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  26. Elizabeth M. Alder, David T. Baird, Martin M. Lees, Dennis W. Lincoln, Nancy B. Loudon & Allan A. Templeton (1986). Attitudes of Women of Reproductive Age to in Vitro Fertilization and Embryo Research. Journal of Biosocial Science 18 (2).score: 427.5
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  27. P. Badham (1987). Christian Belief and the Ethics of in Vitro Fertilization and Abortion. Bioethics News 6 (2):7-18.score: 427.5
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  28. W. Daniel (1986). In Vitro Fertilization: Two Problem Areas'. Australasian Catholic Record 63:21-31.score: 427.5
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  29. Jennifer Gunning, Veronica English & Max Charlesworth (1996). Human In Vitro Fertilization: A Case Study in the Regulation of Medical Innovation. Bioethics-Oxford 10 (2):156-157.score: 427.5
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  30. Claude Ranoux & Machelle M. Seibel (1989). Taking in Vitro Out of Fertilization. Hastings Center Report 19 (5):4-4.score: 427.5
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  31. Margery W. Shaw (1980). In Vitro Fertilization: For Infertile Married Couples Only? Hastings Center Report 10 (5):4-4.score: 427.5
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  32. Margaret O'brien Steinfels (1979). In Vitro Fertilization: 'Ethically Acceptable' Research. Hastings Center Report 9 (3):5-8.score: 427.5
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  33. Colin J. H. Thomson (1984). Australia: In Vitro Fertilization and More. Hastings Center Report 14 (6):14-15.score: 427.5
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  34. Varien R. Tilton & Sandra H. Russell (1984). Applications of in Vitro Pollination/Fertilization Technology. Bioscience 34 (4):239-242.score: 427.5
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  35. Leroy Walters (1979). Human In Vitro Fertilization: A Review of the Ethical Literature. [REVIEW] Hastings Center Report 9 (4):23-43.score: 427.5
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  36. Linda S. Williams (1989). No Relief Until the End: The Physical and Emotional Costs of In Vitro Fertilization. In Christine Overall (ed.), The Future of Human Reproduction. Women's Press. 120--137.score: 427.5
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  37. Zelman Cowen (1985/1986). Reflections on Medicine, Biotechnology, and the Law. Distributed by the University of Nebraska Press.score: 408.0
     
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  38. Albin Eser, Hans-Georg Koch & Carola Seith (eds.) (2007). Internationale Perspektiven Zu Status Und Schutz des Extrakorporalen Embryos: Rechtliche Regelungen Und Stand der Debatte Im Ausland = International Perspectives on the Status and Protection of the Extracorporeal Embryo. Nomos.score: 402.0
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  39. Ana Cláudia Brandão de Barros Correia Ferraz (2009). Reprodução Humana Assistida E Suas Consequências Nas Relações de Família: A Filiação E a Origem Genética Sob a Perspectiva da Repersonalização. Juruá Editora.score: 402.0
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  40. Brigitte Feuillet-Liger (ed.) (2008). Procréation Médicalement Assistée Et Anonymat, Panorama International. Bruylant.score: 402.0
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  41. Andrés Ollero (2006). Bioderecho: Entre la Vida y la Muerte. Thomson/Aranzadi.score: 402.0
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  42. Carola Seith (2007). Status Und Schutz des Extrakorporalen Embryos: Eine Rechtsvergleichende Studie. Nomos.score: 402.0
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  43. Jan Stepan (ed.) (1990). International Survey of Laws on Assisted Procreation. Schulthess Polygraphischer Verlag.score: 402.0
  44. B. Ingemar B. Lindahl (1988). Medical Ethics in Sweden. Theoretical Medicine 9 (3):309-335.score: 336.0
    In this article a brief overview is given of the field of medical ethics in Sweden in recent years. The presentation concentrates on the occurrence of official ethical norms for physicians, current ethical committees, the educational situation, legislation in force, and some essential features of the ethical debate on a few central issues.
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  45. Pierre Mallia (2010). Problems Faced with Legislating for IVF Technology in a Roman Catholic Country. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 13 (1):77-87.score: 318.0
    Malta traditionally enjoys a Roman Catholic Society, with the official religion of the country being cited in the second article of the constitution. Recently the government proposed to legislate to regulate human reproductive technology, in particular In Vitro Fertilization, which has been practiced for over two decades without controlling legislation. A Parliamentary Committee for social affairs was set up to study the situation inviting most stakeholders. The arguments gravitated mostly on issues of the status of the embryo (...)
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  46. Pierre Mallia (2013). Developments in IVF Legislation in a Catholic Country. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (3):385-390.score: 306.0
    Some time ago an article was published in this journal relating the difficulties of legislating for InVitro Fertilization in a Catholic country and the issues and side issues which had to be faced. Since then one has approached closer to having a law which regulates this technology. However several issues continue to challenge the country. The main concern, other than IVF not being a natural method of having children is the status of the embryo. The normative values of the (...)
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  47. Carolyn Mcleod & Françoise Baylis (2007). Donating Fresh Versus Frozen Embryos to Stem Cell Research: In Whose Interests? Bioethics 21 (9):465–477.score: 301.5
    Some stem cell researchers believe that it is easier to derive human embryonic stem cells from fresh rather than frozen embryos and they have had in vitro fertilization (IVF) clinicians invite their infertility patients to donate their fresh embryos for research use. These embryos include those that are deemed 'suitable for transfer' (i.e. to the woman's uterus) and those deemed unsuitable in this regard. This paper focuses on fresh embryos deemed suitable for transfer - hereafter 'fresh embryos'- which (...)
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  48. Mircea Leabu (2012). Christianity and Bioethics. Seeking Arguments for Stem Cell Research in Genesis. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 11 (31):72-87.score: 301.5
    Many Christian scholars, if not all of them, consider Genesis to be foundational texts of the Bible and the spring for all the other doctrines of the Scripture. Therefore, I'm considering the attempt to search and find arguments for cell therapy ethical issues in the fundamental text of Genesis as a challenging and educative task. Moreover, this could be the first step in analyzing the relationships between Christian religions and bioethics, in terms of finding reasonable decisions for ethical challenges, raised (...)
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  49. Kristien Hens (2013). To Transfer or Not to Transfer: The Case of Comprehensive Chromosome Screening of the In Vitro Embryo. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis:1-10.score: 288.0
    The screening of in vitro embryos resulting from in vitro fertilization (IVF) treatment for chromosomal abnormalities (aneuploidies) has as a primary aim to help patients achieve a successful pregnancy. Most IVF centers will not transfer aneuploid embryos, as they have an enhanced risk of leading to implantation failure and miscarriage. However, some aneuploidies, such as trisomy-21, can lead to viable pregnancies and to children with a variable health prognosis, and some prospective parents may request transfer of such (...)
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  50. Sandra Reineke (2008). In Vitro Veritas: New Reproductive and Genetic Technologies and Women's Rights in Contemporary France. International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 1 (1):91 - 125.score: 288.0
    This study examines recent French bioethics laws governing the uses of new reproductive and genetic technologies (NRGTs)—including in-vitro fertilization, surrogate motherhood, prenatal diagnostics, sex selection, and cloning—in light of feminist claims to women's rights, especially a woman's right to reproductive freedom. To this end, the study explores two interrelated questions: First, to what extent have French feminists supported NRGT development and treatment? Second, to what extent do French national bioethics debates, laws, and policies reflect feminist reactions to NRGTs? (...)
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