Search results for 'Financial crises' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Walden Bello (unknown). The Capitalist Conjuncture: Overaccumulation, Financial Crises, and the Retreat From Globalization. Philosophical Explorations:1-24.score: 156.0
    This article argues that the key crisis that has overtaken today’s global economy is the classical capitalist crisis of over-accumulation. Reaganism and structural adjustment were efforts to overcome this crisis in the 1980s, with little success, followed by globalization in the 1990s. The Clinton administration embraced globalization as the “Grand Strategy” of the United States, its two key prongs being the accelerated integration of markets and production by transnational corporations and the creation of a multilateral system of global governance, the (...)
     
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  2. Peter Rosenblum (2005). The World's Banker: A Story of Failed States, Financial Crises, and the Wealth and Poverty of Nations, Sebastian Mallaby (New York: Penguin Press, 2004), 400 Pp., $29.95 Cloth. [REVIEW] Ethics and International Affairs 19 (2):126-128.score: 150.0
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  3. Paul Crosthwaite (2010). Blood on the Trading Floor: Waste, Sacrifice, and Death in Financial Crises. Angelaki 15 (2):3-18.score: 150.0
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  4. A. Khrennikov (2010). Thermodynamic-Like Approach to Complexity of the Financial Market (in the Light of the Present Financial Crises). In Marisa Faggini, Concetto Paolo Vinci, Antonio Abatemarco, Rossella Aiello, F. T. Arecchi, Lucio Biggiero, Giovanna Bimonte, Sergio Bruno, Carl Chiarella, Maria Pia Di Gregorio, Giacomo Di Tollo, Simone Giansante, Jaime Gil Aluja, A. I͡U Khrennikov, Marianna Lyra, Riccardo Meucci, Guglielmo Monaco, Giancarlo Nota, Serena Sordi, Pietro Terna, Kumaraswamy Velupillai & Alessandro Vercelli (eds.), Decision Theory and Choices: A Complexity Approach. Springer Verlag Italia. 183--203.score: 150.0
  5. Thomas Ehrlich Reifer (2009). Lawyers, Guns and Money: Wall Street Lawyers, Investment Bankers and Global Financial Crises, Late 19th Early 21st Century. [REVIEW] Nexus 15:119.score: 150.0
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  6. Martin Gessmann (2012). On Crises, Disasters, and the Reawakening of the Story French Philosophy to Fukushima and the Financial Crisis. Philosophische Rundschau 59 (4):289 - 322.score: 120.0
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  7. Roger Berkowitz & Taun N. Toay (eds.) (2013). The Intellectual Origins of the Global Financial Crisis. Fordham University Press.score: 96.0
    The essays in this volume delve deeper into the cultural and intellectual foundations, philosophical ideas, political traditions, and economic movements that underlie the greatest financial crisis in nearly a century.
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  8. Ned Dobos, Christian Barry & Thomas Winfried Menko Pogge (eds.) (2011). Global Financial Crisis: The Ethical Issues. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 90.0
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  9. John E. Roemer (2012). Ideology, Social Ethos, and the Financial Crisis. Journal of Ethics 16 (3):273-303.score: 72.0
    The crisis of 2008–2009 has been viewed primarily as a financial one, which has spilled over into the economy more generally. I want to argue that there is a much deeper crisis, of which the present one is a result. The deeper crisis is political: more specifically, it is a crisis in the ideology and social ethos of the American people. I refer to what has happened to the thinking of United States citizens since the Second World War, and (...)
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  10. Leonid Grinin, Andrey Korotayev & Sergey Malkov (2010). A Mathematical Model of Juglar Cycles and the Current Global Crisis. In Leonid Grinin, Peter Herrmann, Andrey Korotayev & Arno Tausch (eds.), History & Mathematics: Processes and Models of Global Dynamics.score: 72.0
    The article presents a verbal and mathematical model of medium-term business cycles (with a characteristic period of 7–11 years) known as Juglar cycles. The model takes into account a number of approaches to the analysis of such cycles; in the meantime it also takes into account some of the authors' own generalizations and additions that are important for understanding the internal logic of the cycle, its variability and its peculiarities in the present-time conditions. The authors argue that the most important (...)
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  11. Appa Rao Korukonda & Chenchu Ramaiah T. Bathala (2004). Ethics, Equity, and Social Justice in the New Economic Order: Using Financial Information for Keeping Social Score. Journal of Business Ethics 54 (1):1-15.score: 72.0
    In the present world order unbridled forces of free market capitalism are frequently cited for much of the social injustice, inequity, and disparity of wealth between the rich and the poor. Although history''s verdict in favor of the free markets could hardly be harsher or clearer, it is clear that after the initial wave of triumph, the free market paradigm has developed some cracks in its façade. What marks the trail of such sustained and pronounced move toward free markets in (...)
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  12. David Lea (2014). The Future of the Humanities in Today's Financial Markets. Educational Theory 64 (3):261-283.score: 60.0
    In this essay David Lea approaches the decline in the study and teaching of the humanities within the university context from a financial perspective. As humanities departments are either closed down or have their curriculum attenuated, it is obvious that the revenue previously available to support such programs has not been forthcoming. This change is often explained as the result of cost cutting necessary during periods of financial crisis, but this justification is belied by the fact that while (...)
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  13. Douglas W. Arner, Financial Stability, Economic Growth, and the Role of Law.score: 60.0
    Financial crises have become an all-too-common occurrence over the past twenty years, largely as a result of changes in finance brought about by increasing internationalization and integration. As domestic financial systems and economies become more interlinked, weaknesses can significantly impact not only individual economies but also markets, financial intermediaries and economies around the world. This volume addresses the twin objectives of financial development in the context of financial stability and the role of law in (...)
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  14. Phillip Y. Lipscy & Hirofumi Takinami (2013). The Politics of Financial Crisis Response in Japan and the United States. Japanese Journal of Political Science 14 (3):321-353.score: 60.0
    We examine the politics of financial crisis response in Japan and the United States. Many existing accounts of Japan's of the 1990s have emphasized Japan-specific factors, such as structural problems, policy errors, and political dysfunction. We argue that Japan may have been subject to a form of first-mover disadvantage. Like innovation in the private sector, developing effective solutions to novel policy problems requires a messy process of discovery, experimentation, and repeated failure. Much as late-industrializing countries adapted the methods and (...)
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  15. Christopher J. Cowton & Yvonne Downs, Heated Debates and Cool Analysis: Thinking Well About Financial Ethics.score: 60.0
    Not for the first time, the banks and other financial institutions have got themselves – and the rest of us – into a mess, this time on an unprecedented financial and geographical scale. It is no surprise that opinions about causes, consequences and cures abound with ethical issues, as well as technical and economic concerns, a focus of attention. It is to be hoped that useful lessons for the future will be learned. In this chapter, however, we step (...)
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  16. Jukka M. Laitamaki, Raija Järvinen & Uolevi Lehtinen (2008). Irrational Consumer Behavior in Financial Services. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 19:16-22.score: 60.0
    Consumer driven and globally competitive financial markets are crucial for the future prosperity of the Finnish society (Laitamäki, Lehti and Paasio 1996). The largest transfer of wealth in history is currently taking place as Baby Boomers (born 1946-1964) prepare for their retirement and inherit the assets of the previous generation. Due to cognitive limitations and emotional biases these consumers don’t always make rational decisions with financial services. This conceptual study addresses irrational financial consumer behavior and its impact (...)
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  17. H. -P. Dürr (2011). Das Lebende Lebendiger Werden Lassen: Wie Uns Neues Denken Aus der Krise Führt. Oekom.score: 60.0
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  18. José María Méndez (2012). ¿Crisis Económica o Crisis de Valores?: Una Propuesta Axiológica. Sepha Edición y Diseño.score: 60.0
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  19. Matthias Rugel, Johannes Wallacher & Julia Blasch (eds.) (2011). Die Globale Finanzkrise Als Ethische Herausforderung. Kohlhammer.score: 60.0
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  20. Colin Fisher & Shishir Malde (2011). Moral Imagination or Heuristic Toolbox? Events and the Risk Assessment of Structured Financial Products in the Financial Bubble. Business Ethics 20 (2):148-158.score: 54.0
    The paper uses the example of the failure of bankers and financial managers to understand the risks of dealing in structured financial products, before the financial collapse, to investigate how people respond to crises. It focuses on whether crises cause people to challenge their habitual frames by the application of moral imagination. It is proposed that the structure of financial products and their markets triggered the use of heuristics that contributed to the underestimation of (...)
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  21. Bernhard Emunds (2003). The Integration of Developing Countries Into International Financial Markets. Business Ethics Quarterly 13 (3):337-359.score: 54.0
    In this paper the co-responsibility of the North for the development of the South, the chance of an authentic developmentand Rawls’s maximin rule are indicated as the ethical perspectives from which the financial integration of developing countries will beevaluated. It follows a brief economic analysis of possible problems of high inflows of portfolio investments for developing countries. They become more vulnerable to financial and monetary crises and their domestic banking systems are weakened by a higher risk of (...)
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  22. Wesley Cragg & Dirk Matten (2011). Ethics, Corporations, and Governance. Journal of Business Ethics 102 (S1):1-4.score: 42.0
    Corporate governance has resurfaced as a topic in the ongoing financial crises. This article frames the debate on corporate governance within the ongoing concerns about the corporate role in wider societal governance. It then maps out the context of the six scholarly contributions in this special issue by highlighting how the current debate moves towards a closer integration of governance at corporate and societal level.
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  23. Gerald Moore (2012). Crises of Derrida: Theodicy, Sacrifice and (Post-)Deconstruction. Derrida Today 5 (2):264-282.score: 36.0
    The last few years have seen the emergence of a more political, ‘post-Derridean’ generation, critical of the impotent messianism of the politics of deconstruction. As Žižek would have it: ‘Derrida's notion of ‘deconstruction as ethics’ seems to rely on a utopian hope which sustains the spectre of ‘infinite justice’, forever postponed, always to come’ (Žižek 2008: 225). The promise of redemption, it follows, would reside in an insubstantial promissory value, in the writing of irredeemable cheques that, if cashed in, could (...)
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  24. Nathalie Rachlin & Rosemarie Scullion (2014). Introduction: From Engagé to Indigné: French Cinema and the Crises of Globalization. Substance 43 (1):3-12.score: 36.0
    In 2010, two years after the global financial collapse that triggered the worst economic crisis since the Great Depression of the 1930s, the best-selling publication in France was not that year’s Prix Goncourt,1 Michel Houellebecq’s La carte et le territoire (The Map and the Territory), a novel published by Flammarion, one of Paris’s leading publishing houses. That honor went to Indignez-vous! (Time for Outrage!), a 32-page pamphlet authored by 93-year-old Stéphane Hessel, a former hero of the French Resistance, a (...)
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  25. Aaron James, The Hazards of Capital Liberalization.score: 30.0
    Financial crises are now commonplace in the global economy. It was not always so. For over two decades after World War II, under the Bretton Woods system of capital controls, financial crises were relatively rare.[1] Since the early 1970’s the number and frequency of financial crises (currency crises, banking crises, sovereign debt crises, or combinations thereof) increased dramatically, culminating in the enormously destructive global crisis of 2008-2009. (By one count, there were (...)
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  26. María G. Navarro (2011). Critical Notice of 'The Uses of Pessimism' by Roger Scruton. [REVIEW] Metapsychology. Online Reviews 15 (15).score: 30.0
    The thesis put forward by the British philosopher, Roger Scruton (born 1944) in The Uses of Pessimism seems simple: false hope together with an optimism that is unfounded and unscrupulous are the cause of the most harmful conflicts of our times. Political conflicts, institutional and financial crises, unjustified pedagogic notions, non-consensual town planning, etc., are some of the issues that the author analyses with the help of specific historical examples. Before referring to some of these issues, I shall (...)
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  27. Amit Saini & Kelly D. Martin (2009). Strategic Risk-Taking Propensity: The Role of Ethical Climate and Marketing Output Control. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 90 (4):593 - 606.score: 30.0
    In the wake of the current financial crises triggered by risky mortgage-backed securities, the question of ethics and risk-taking is once again at the front and center for both practitioners and academics. Although risk-taking is considered an integral part of strategic decision-making, sometimes firms could be propelled to take risks driven by reasons other than calculated strategic choices. The authors argue that a firm's risk-taking propensity is impacted by its ethical climate (egoistic or benevolent) and its emphasis on (...)
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  28. Geoff Moore (2012). The Virtue of Governance, the Governance of Virtue. Business Ethics Quarterly 22 (2):293-318.score: 30.0
    The current economic and preceding financial crises seem to provide evidence in favour of the self-destruction thesis of capitalism. Responses to the crisis have been polarised. Some suggest that regulatory changes are all that is needed. Others suggest the need to change the economic system by developing a new global economic ethic. The first is too limited, the second too utopian. This article suggests that a MacIntyrean virtue ethics approach provides both a more convincing diagnosis of the problem (...)
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  29. George Selgin (1993). The Rationalization of Central Banks. Critical Review 7 (2-3):335-354.score: 30.0
    Charles Goodhart's The Evolution of Central Banks represents a rare and welcome attempt to spell out those shortcomings of ?free banking? that supply a rationale for the establishment of central banks. However, one of Goodhart's principal arguments?that central banks are practically inevitable outgrowths of the ?natural? tendency for bank reserves to become concentrated in a dominant ?bankers? bank? ? understates the role legal restrictions have played in sponsoring the emergence of bankers? banks, including the Bank of England. Some of Goodhart's (...)
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  30. Joanna P. Ganning, Courtney G. Flint & Stephen Gasteyer (2012). A Case Study From the Post-New Deal State Agricultural Experiment Station System: A Life of Mixed Signals in Southern Illinois. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 29 (4):493-506.score: 30.0
    A wide literature in the sociology of agriculture has depicted the development of agricultural experiment stations at land grant colleges as part of a development project to improve agricultural productivity in particular commodities. Some experiment stations developed regional agricultural centers or stations to improve productivity and address local concerns, recognizing the importance of context in rural development. Through analysis of one such station, the Dixon Springs Agricultural Center in Southern Illinois, this paper describes how regional agricultural stations played a key (...)
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  31. Wang Yuzhu (2011). China, Economic Regionalism, and East Asian Integration. Japanese Journal of Political Science 12 (2):195-212.score: 30.0
    As a rising power, China has become actively involved in regional bilateral/multilateral arrangements in the post-Cold War, especially post-crisis (1997– 98 financial crises) era, and this has attracted much attention from within and outside East Asia. Diverse understandings of China's regional ambition have appeared, especially since the launch of the China-ASEAN free trade agreement (FTA). Aiming at deciphering the ideas behind China's regional thinking, this paper argues that China's perspective on regionalism is a broadened economic regionalism, which is (...)
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  32. Christian Barry & Matthew Peterson (2010). Dealing Fairly with the Costs to the Poor of the Global Financial Crisis. In Iain MacNeil & Justin O'Brien (eds.), The Future of Financial Regulation. Hart.score: 24.0
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  33. Clive R. Boddy (2011). The Corporate Psychopaths Theory of the Global Financial Crisis. Journal of Business Ethics 102 (2):255-259.score: 24.0
    This short theoretical paper elucidates a plausible theory about the Global Financial Crisis and the role of senior financial corporate directors in that crisis. The paper presents a theory of the Global Financial Crisis which argues that psychopaths working in corporations and in financial corporations, in particular, have had a major part in causing the crisis. This paper is thus a very short theoretical paper but is one that may be very important to the future of (...)
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  34. Nicholas Maxwell (2012). How Universities Can Help Humanity Learn How to Resolve the Crises of Our Times - From Knowledge to Wisdom: The University College London Experience. In G. Heam, T. Katlelle & D. Rooney (eds.), Handbook on the Knowledge Economy, vol. 2. Edward Elgar Publishing Ltd.score: 24.0
    We are in a state of impending crisis. And the fault lies in part with academia. For two centuries or so, academia has been devoted to the pursuit of knowledge and technological know-how. This has enormously increased our power to act which has, in turn, brought us both all the great benefits of the modern world and the crises we now face. Modern science and technology have made possible modern industry and agriculture, the explosive growth of the world’s population, (...)
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  35. W. Gary Simpson & Theodor Kohers (2002). The Link Between Corporate Social and Financial Performance: Evidence From the Banking Industry. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 35 (2):97 - 109.score: 24.0
    The purpose of this investigation is to extend earlier research on the relationship between corporate social and financial performance. The unique contribution of the study is the empirical analysis of a sample of companies from the banking industry and the use of Community Reinvestment Act ratings as a social performance measure. The empirical analysis solidly supports the hypothesis that the link between social and financial performance is positive.
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  36. Minna Halme & Juha Laurila (2009). Philanthropy, Integration or Innovation? Exploring the Financial and Societal Outcomes of Different Types of Corporate Responsibility. Journal of Business Ethics 84 (3):325 - 339.score: 24.0
    This article argues that previous research on the outcomes of corporate responsibility should be refined in two ways. First, although there is abundant research that addresses the link between corporate responsibility (CR) and financial performance, hardly any studies scrutinize whether the type of corporate responsibility makes a difference to this link. Second, while the majority of CR research conducted within business studies concentrates on the financial outcomes for the firm, the societal outcomes of CR are left largely unexplored. (...)
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  37. Pieter van Beurden & Tobias Gössling (2008). The Worth of Values – a Literature Review on the Relation Between Corporate Social and Financial Performance. Journal of Business Ethics 82 (2):407-424.score: 24.0
    One of the older questions in the debate about Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) is whether it is worthwhile for organizations to pay attention to societal demands. This debate was emotionally, normatively, and ideologically loaded. Up to the present, this question has been an important trigger for empirical research in CSR. However, the answer to the question has apparently not been found yet, at least that is what many researchers state. This apparent ambivalence in CSR consequences invites a literature study that (...)
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  38. Maria-Gaia Soana (2011). The Relationship Between Corporate Social Performance and Corporate Financial Performance in the Banking Sector. Journal of Business Ethics 104 (1):133-148.score: 24.0
    Since the 1970s, many Anglo-American studies have investigated the theme of corporate social responsibility (CSR) and its costs and benefits. Most studies have tried to test, largely in samples of multiple industries, the relationship between corporate social performance (CSP) and corporate financial performance (CFP). These analyses, however, have produced conflicting results and any attempt to give a generalized and coherent conclusion has proved inadequate. This article examines the ways CSP can be proxied and investigates the possible relationship between CSP (...)
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  39. Marc Orlitzky (2001). Does Firm Size Comfound the Relationship Between Corporate Social Performance and Firm Financial Performance? Journal of Business Ethics 33 (2):167 - 180.score: 24.0
    There has been some theoretical and empirical debate that the positive relationship between corporate social performance (CSP) and firm financial performance (FFP) is spurious and in fact caused by a third factor, namely large firm size. This study examines this question by integrating three meta-analyses of more than two decades of research on (1) CSP and FFP, (2) firm size and CSP, and (3) firm size and FFP into one path-analytic model. The present study does not confirm size as (...)
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  40. Réal Labelle, Rim Makni Gargouri & Claude Francoeur (2010). Ethics, Diversity Management, and Financial Reporting Quality. Journal of Business Ethics 93 (2):335 - 355.score: 24.0
    This article proposes and empirically tests a theoretical framework incorporating Reidenbach and Robin’s (J Bus Ethics 10(4):273–284, 1991 ) conceptual model of corporate moral development. The framework is used to examine the relation between governance and business ethics, as proxied by diversity management (DM), and financial reporting quality, as proxied by the magnitude of earnings management (EM). The level of DM and governance quality are measured in accordance with the ratings of Jantzi Research (JR), a leading provider of social (...)
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  41. Rim Makni, Claude Francoeur & François Bellavance (2009). Causality Between Corporate Social Performance and Financial Performance: Evidence From Canadian Firms. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 89 (3):409 - 422.score: 24.0
    This study assesses the causal relationship between corporate social performance (CSP) and financial performance (FP). We perform our empirical analyses on a sample of 179 publicly held Canadian firms and use the measures of CSP provided by Canadian Social Investment Database for the years 2004 and 2005. Using the “Granger causality” approach, we find no significant relationship between a composite measure of a firm’s CSP and FP, except for market returns. However, using individual measures of CSP, we find a (...)
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  42. Bernadette M. Ruf, Krishnamurty Muralidhar, Robert M. Brown, Jay J. Janney & Karen Paul (2001). An Empirical Investigation of the Relationship Between Change in Corporate Social Performance and Financial Performance: A Stakeholder Theory Perspective. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 32 (2):143 - 156.score: 24.0
    Stakeholder theory provides a framework for investigating the relationship between corporate social performance (CSP) and corporate financial performance. This relationship is investigated by examining how change in CSP is related to change in financial accounting measures. The findings provide some support for a tenet in stakeholder theory which asserts that the dominant stakeholder group, shareholders, financially benefit when management meets the demands of multiple stakeholders. Specifically, change in CSP was positively associated with growth in sales for the current (...)
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  43. Geoff Moore (2001). Corporate Social and Financial Performance: An Investigation in the U.K. Supermarket Industry. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 34 (3-4):299 - 315.score: 24.0
    The comparison of corporate social performance with corporate financial performance has been a popular field of study over the past 25 years. The results, while broadly conclusive of a positive relationship, are not entirely consistent. In addition, most of the previous studies have concentrated on large-scale cross-industry studies and often with a single variable for corporate social performance, in order to produce statistically significant results. This weakens the richness of understanding that might be obtained from a single industry study (...)
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  44. K. Gregory Jin, Ronald Drozdenko & Sara DeLoughy (2013). The Role of Corporate Value Clusters in Ethics, Social Responsibility, and Performance: A Study of Financial Professionals and Implications for the Financial Meltdown. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 112 (1):15-24.score: 24.0
    This article delves into a potential mindset that may be responsible for the recent financial meltdown. Research relating to this mindset from different perspectives is reviewed. The findings from this literature review are used to create a conceptual framework for the empirical, ethical, and corporate social responsibility study of financial professionals. Data were collected from a survey of the professional membership of a large national association of financial professionals. This article reports the results of the analysis of (...)
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  45. Thomas J. Frecka (2008). Ethical Issues in Financial Reporting: Is Intentional Structuring of Lease Contracts to Avoid Capitalization Unethical? [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 80 (1):45 - 59.score: 24.0
    Under present accounting rules, lessees frequently structure contracts for leased assets, in situations where they enjoy benefits similar to outright ownership, in a way that keeps both the leased assets and related liabilities off their books. This method of accounting creates off-balance sheet financing and is called operating lease accounting. The paper debates the ethicality of intentionally structuring lease contracts to avoid disclosing leased asset and liability amounts and describes the “slippery slope” of rule-based accounting for synthetic leases and special (...)
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  46. Yves Fassin & Derrick Gosselin (2011). The Collapse of a European Bank in the Financial Crisis: An Analysis From Stakeholder and Ethical Perspectives. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 102 (2):169-191.score: 24.0
    Fortis, the leading Benelux financial group, had been a success story of successive mergers of bank and insurance companies, with leadership in corporate social responsibility (CSR). One year after the acquisition of the major Dutch financial conglomerate ABN AMRO, the global financial crisis caused the collapse of the Fortis group. The purpose of this article is to use the case study of Fortis’s recent fall as a basis for reflective considerations on the financial crisis, from stakeholder (...)
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  47. James C. Gaa (2009). Corporate Governance and the Responsibility of the Board of Directors for Strategic Financial Reporting. Journal of Business Ethics 90 (2):179 - 197.score: 24.0
    One of the fundamental principles of good corporate governance is transparency, i.e., the disclosure of private information to external stakeholders, so that they may make judgments and decisions relating to the corporation. Equally important, but less discussed, is the competing value that corporations need to protect legitimate secrets. Corporations thus need a communication strategy for dealing with external stakeholders which addresses the conflict between disclosure and secrecy. This article focuses on an important element of that communication strategy in the context (...)
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  48. Donald F. Sacco, Samuel V. Bruton, Alen Hajnal & Chris J. N. Lustgraaf (forthcoming). The Influence of Disclosure and Ethics Education on Perceptions of Financial Conflicts of Interest. Science and Engineering Ethics:1-20.score: 24.0
    This study explored how disclosure of financial conflicts of interest (FCOI) influences naïve or “lay” individuals’ perceptions of the ethicality of researcher conduct. On a between-subjects basis, participants read ten scenarios in which researchers disclosed or failed to disclose relevant financial conflicts of interest. Participants evaluated the extent to which each vignette represented a FCOI, its possible influence on researcher objectivity, and the ethics of the financial relationship. Participants were then asked if they had completed a college-level (...)
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  49. Guido Palazzo & Lena Rethel (2008). Conflicts of Interest in Financial Intermediation. Journal of Business Ethics 81 (1):193 - 207.score: 24.0
    The last years have seen a surge of scandals in financial intermediation. This article argues that the agency structure inherent to most forms of financial intermediation gives rise to conflicts of interest. Though this does not excuse scandalous behavior it points out market imperfections. There are four types of conflicts of interest: personal-individual, personal-organizational, impersonal-individual, and finally, impersonal-organizational conflicts. Analyzing recent scandals we find that all four types of conflicts of interest prevail in financial intermediation.
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  50. Jyoti D. Mahadeo, Teerooven Soobaroyen & Vanisha Oogarah Hanuman (2012). Board Composition and Financial Performance: Uncovering the Effects of Diversity in an Emerging Economy. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 105 (3):375-388.score: 24.0
    We examine the key elements of board diversity (or heterogeneity) amongst listed companies operating in an emerging economy (Mauritius) and the extent to which these influence financial performance. Specifically, we ask whether there is evidence of tangible benefits in pursuing a strategy of board diversity in terms of gender-, age-, educational background and independence in a corporate context which has long been dominated by family-led and ‘closed’ boardrooms. In light of recent corporate governance developments which appear to foster greater (...)
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