Search results for 'Florence Finch Kelly' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Florence Finch Kelly, Not a Decree, but a Prophecy.score: 290.0
    Have I made a mistake in my Anarchism, or has the editor of Liberty himself tripped? At any rate, I must challenge the Anarchism of one sentence in his otherwise masterful paper upon 'State Socialism and Anarchism.' If I am wrong, I stand open to conviction. It is this. 'They [Anarchists] look forward to a time...when the children born of these relations shall belong exclusively to the mothers until old enough to belong to themselves.'.
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  2. Kevin Kelly, Kevin Kelly, Oliver Schulte, Vincent Hendricks.score: 120.0
    Philosophical logicians proposing theories of rational belief revision have had little to say about whether their proposals assist or impede the agent's ability to reliably arrive at the truth as his beliefs change through time. On the other hand, reliability is the central concern of formal learning theory. In this paper we investigate the belief revision theory of Alchourron, Gardenfors and Makinson from a learning theoretic point of view.
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  3. George Armstrong Kelly (1979). A Reply From George Armstrong Kelly. The Owl of Minerva 10 (4):10-11.score: 120.0
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  4. Michael Kelly, Edgar Morin: Introduction (Special Issue Edited by Michael Kelly).score: 120.0
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  5. Kevin Kelly, Kevin T. Kelly and Oliver Schulte.score: 120.0
    We argue that uncomputability and classical scepticism are both re ections of inductive underdetermination, so that Church's thesis and Hume's problem ought to receive equal emphasis in a balanced approach to the philosophy of induction. As an illustration of such an approach, we investigate how uncomputable the predictions of a hypothesis can be if the hypothesis is to be reliably investigated by a computable scienti c method.
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  6. Mary Kelly (2007). 17 Mary Kelly. In Diarmuid Costello & Jonathan Vickery (eds.), Art: Key Contemporary Thinkers. Berg. 17.score: 120.0
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  7. Kevin T. Kelly, Julie Clague, Bernard Hoose & Gerard Mannion (eds.) (2008). Moral Theology for the Twenty-First Century: Essays in Celebration of Kevin Kelly. T & T Clark.score: 120.0
     
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  8. Sean D. Kelly (2001). The Relevance of Phenomenology to the Philosophy of Language and Mind. New York: Garland Publishing.score: 60.0
    Through discussion of phenomenological and analytic traditions such as the philosophical problems of perceptual content, the content of demonstrative thoughts and the unity of proposition, Kelly explains that these concepts are not as alien to one another as most people believe.
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  9. Michael Kelly (2003). Iconoclasm in Aesthetics. Cambridge University Press.score: 60.0
    Although philosophers have characteristically taken the view that art is a vehicle of some universal meaning or truth, art historians emphasize the concrete, historical location of the individual work of art. Is aesthetics capable of sustaining these two approaches? Or, as Michael Kelly argues: Is art actually determined by its historical particularity? His book covers the views of four philosophers--Heidegger, Adorno, Derrida, and Danto--ultimately iconoclasts, despite their significant philosophical engagement with the arts.
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  10. Kevin T. Kelly & Clark Glymour, Why Bayesian Confirmation Does Not Capture the Logic of Scientific Justification.score: 60.0
    Kevin T. Kelly and Clark Glymour. Why Bayesian Confirmation Does Not Capture the Logic of Scientific Justification.
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  11. Kevin T. Kelly & Clark Glymour (1992). Inductive Inference From Theory Laden Data. Journal of Philosophical Logic 21 (4):391 - 444.score: 60.0
    Kevin T. Kelly and Clark Glymour. Inductive Inference from Theory-Laden Data.
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  12. Michael Kelly, Post-Structuralism.score: 60.0
    Michael Kelly is the author of 68 entries altogether. The New Oxford Companion to Literature in French is far more than a simple revision of the original Oxford Companion to French Literature , published in 1959, and described by The Listener as the `standard work of reference for English-speaking enquirers into French literature'. As the change in title implies, this completely new work presents an authoritative guide not only to ten centuries of literature produced in the territory now called (...)
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  13. Conor Mayo-Wilson & Kevin Kelly, Ockham Efficiency Theorem for Stochastic Empirical Methods.score: 60.0
    Ockham’s razor is the principle that, all other things being equal, scientists ought to prefer simpler theories. In recent years, philosophers have argued that simpler theories make better predictions, possess theoretical virtues like explanatory power, and have other pragmatic virtues like computational tractability. However, such arguments fail to explain how and why a preference for simplicity can help one find true theories in scientific inquiry, unless one already assumes that the truth is simple. One new solution to that problem is (...)
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  14. Jamie Terence Kelly (2012). Framing Democracy: A Behavioral Approach to Democratic Theory. Princeton University Press.score: 60.0
    The past thirty years have seen a surge of empirical research into political decision making and the influence of framing effects--the phenomenon that occurs when different but equivalent presentations of a decision problem elicit different judgments or preferences. During the same period, political philosophers have become increasingly interested in democratic theory, particularly in deliberative theories of democracy. Unfortunately, the empirical and philosophical studies of democracy have largely proceeded in isolation from each other. As a result, philosophical treatments of democracy have (...)
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  15. Kevin T. Kelly, Cory Juhl & Clark Glymour, Reliability, Realism, and Relativism.score: 60.0
    Kevin T. Kelly, Cory Juhl and Clark Glymour. Reliability, Realism, and Relativism.
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  16. John Fitz-Herbert & Gerard Kelly (2011). Reflections on the Readings of Sundays and Feasts September - November. Australasian Catholic Record, The 88 (3):358.score: 60.0
    Fitz-Herbert, John; Kelly, Gerard The 'pastoral care of the sick' is one of the important responses to the gospel that occurs in almost every parish. Faithful Sunday parishioners visit other parishioners week-in and week-out. They put into deed the concern of the believing community for the one who is unable to gather with the Sunday community for eucharist. They bring holy communion as well as friendship and their pastoral concern to the person being visited. Sometimes it happens that this (...)
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  17. Michael Kelly, Philosophies of Marxism: Gramsci, Lukacs, Benjamin, Althusser.score: 60.0
    Table of contents : 1. The beginnings of phenomenology: Husserl and his predecessors Richard Cobb-Stevens, Boston College 2. Philosophy of existence 1: Heidegger Jacques Taminiaux, University of Louvain, Belgium 3. Philosophy of existence 2: Sartre Thomas Flynn, Emory University 4. Philosophy of existence 3: Merleau-Ponty Bernard Cullen, Queen's University, Belfast 5. Philosophies of religion: Jaspers, Marcel, Levinas William Desmond, Loyola College 6. Philosophies of science: Mach, Duhem, Bachelard Babette Babich, Fordham University 7. Philosophies of Marxism: Gramsci, Lukacs, Benjamin, Althusser Michael (...)
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  18. Clark Glymour, Richard Scheines, Peter Spirtes & Kevin T. Kelly, Discovering Causal Structure: Artifical Intelligence, Philosophy of Science and Statistical Modeling.score: 60.0
    Clark Glymour, Richard Scheines, Peter Spirtes and Kevin Kelly. Discovering Causal Structure: Artifical Intelligence, Philosophy of Science and Statistical Modeling.
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  19. Gerard Kelly (2014). The Impact of the Second Vatican Council. Australasian Catholic Record, The 91 (2):146.score: 60.0
    Kelly, Gerard There can be no doubting that the Second Vatican Council has had a remarkable impact on the Catholic Church and its people in Australia. Many would argue that the council's influence extends far beyond the Catholic Church and touches other churches.
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  20. Kevin T. Kelly, Version Spaces, Structural Descriptions and NP-Completeness.score: 60.0
    Kevin T. Kelly. Version Spaces, Structural Descriptions and NP-Completeness.
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  21. Clark Glymour & Kevin T. Kelly, Thoroughly Modern Meno.score: 60.0
    Clark Glymour and Kevin T. Kelly. Thoroughly Modern Meno.
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  22. Kevin T. Kelly, General Characteristics of Inductive Inference Over Arbitrary Sets of Data Representations.score: 60.0
    Kevin T. Kelly. General Characteristics of Inductive Inference Over Arbitrary Sets of Data Representations.
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  23. Michael Kelly, Humanism and National Unity: The Ideological Reconstruction of France.score: 60.0
    Contents: The Communist Party and the politics of cultural change in postwar Italy, 1945-50 / Stephen Gundle -- Writing and the real world : Italian narrative in the period of reconstruction / Michael Caesar -- The making and unmaking of Neorealism in postwar Italy / David Forgacs -- The place of Neorealism in Italian cinema from 1945 to 1954 / Christopher Wagstaff -- Tradition and social change in the French and Italian cinemas of the reconstruction / Pierre Sorlin -- Humanism (...)
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  24. Gerard Kelly (2011). Sunday Matters: Reflections on the Lectionary Readings for Year A [Book Review]. Australasian Catholic Record, The 88 (2):249.score: 60.0
    Kelly, Gerard Review(s) of: Sunday Matters: Reflections on the Lectionary Readings for Year A, by Mark O'Brien OP (Hindmarsh SA: ATF Press, 2010), pp.201, $34.95.
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  25. P. J. Kelly (1990). Utilitarianism and Distributive Justice: Jeremy Bentham and the Civil Law. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    Drawing extensively on Bentham's unpublished civil and distributive law writings, classical and recent Bentham scholarship, and contemporary work in moral and political philosophy, Kelly here presents the first full-length exposition and sympathetic defense of Bentham's unique utilitarian theory of justice. Kelly shows how Bentham developed a moderate welfare-state liberal theory of justice with egalitarian leanings, the aim of which was to secure the material and political conditions of each citizen's pursuit of the good life in cooperation with each (...)
     
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  26. Sean D. Kelly (2002). Merleau-Ponty on the Body: The Logic of Motor Intentional Activity. Ratio-New Series 15 (4):376-391.score: 30.0
  27. Sean D. Kelly (2005). Seeing Things in Merleau-Ponty. In C. Tarman (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Merleau-Ponty. Cambridge.score: 30.0
    The passage above comes from the opening pages of Merleau-Ponty’s essay on Edmund Husserl. It proposes a risky interpretive principle. The main feature of this principle is that the seminal aspects of a thinker’s work are so close to him that he is incapable of articulating them himself. Nevertheless, these aspects pervade the work, give it its style, its sense and its direction, and therefore belong to it essentially. As Martin Heidegger writes, in a passage quoted by Merleau-Ponty:
    The (...)
    The goal of Merleau-Ponty’s essay, he says, is “to evoke this un-thought-of element in Husserl’s thought”.3. (shrink)
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  28. Sean D. Kelly (2001). The Non-Conceptual Content of Perceptual Experience: Situation Dependence and Fineness of Grain. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 62 (3):601-608.score: 30.0
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  29. Sean D. Kelly (2005). The Puzzle of Temporal Experience. In Andrew Brook (ed.), Cognition and the Brain: The Philosophy and Neuroscience Movement. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 208--238.score: 30.0
    There you are at the opera house. The soprano has just hit her high note – a glassshattering high C that fills the hall – and she holds it. She holds it. She holds it. She holds it. She holds it. She holds the note for such a long time that after a while a funny thing happens: you no longer seem only to hear it, the note as it is currently sounding, that glass-shattering high C that is loud and (...)
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  30. Alicia Finch & Ted A. Warfield (1998). The Mind Argument and Libertarianism. Mind 107 (427):515-28.score: 30.0
    Many critics of libertarian freedom have charged that freedom is incompatible with indeterminism. We show that the strongest argument that has been provided for this claim is invalid. The invalidity of the argument in question, however, implies the invalidity of the standard Consequence argument for the incompatibility of freedom and determinism. We show how to repair the Consequence argument and argue that no similar improvement will revive the worry about the compatibility of indeterminism and freedom.
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  31. Sean D. Kelly (2001). Demonstrative Concepts and Experience. Philosophical Review 110 (3):397-420.score: 30.0
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  32. Donald Borrett, Sean D. Kelly & Hon Kwan (2000). Bridging Embodied Cognition and Brain Function: The Role of Phenomenology. Philosophical Psychology 13 (2):261-266.score: 30.0
    Both cognitive science and phenomenology accept the primacy of the organism-environment system and recognize that cognition should be understood in terms of an embodied agent situated in its environment. How embodiment is seen to shape our world, however, is fundamentally different in these two disciplines. Embodiment, as understood in cognitive science, reduces to a discussion of the consequences of having a body like ours interacting with our environment and the relationship is one of contingent causality. Embodiment, as understood phenomenologically, represents (...)
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  33. Hubert L. Dreyfus & Sean D. Kelly (2007). Heterophenomenology: Heavy-Handed Sleight-of-Hand. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 6 (1-2):45-55.score: 30.0
    We argue that heterophenomenology both over- and under-populates the intentional realm. For example, when one is involved in coping, one’s mind does not contain beliefs. Since the heterophenomenologist interprets all intentional commitment as belief, he necessarily overgenerates the belief contents of the mind. Since beliefs cannot capture the normative aspect of coping and perceiving, any method, such as heterophenomenology, that allows for only beliefs is guaranteed not only to overgenerate beliefs but also to undergenerate other kinds of intentional phenomena.
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  34. Sean D. Kelly (2004). Reference and Attention: A Difficult Connection. [REVIEW] Philosophical Studies 120 (1-3):277-86.score: 30.0
    I am very much in sympathy with the overall approach of John Campbell’s paper, “Reference as Attention”. My sympathy extends to a variety of its features. I think he is right to suppose, for instance, that neuropsychological cases provide important clues about how we should treat some traditional philosophical problems concerning perception and reference. I also think he is right to suppose that there are subtle but important relations between the phenomena of perception, action, consciousness, attention, and reference. I even (...)
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  35. Thomas Kelly (2002). The Rationality of Belief and Other Propositional Attitudes. Philosophical Studies 110 (2):163-96.score: 30.0
    In this paper, I explore the question of whether the expected consequences of holding a belief can affect the rationality of doing so. Special attention is given to various ways in which one might attempt to exert some measure of control over what one believes and the normative status of the beliefs that result from the successful execution of such projects. I argue that the lessons which emerge from thinking about the case ofbelief have important implications for the way we (...)
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  36. Kevin T. Kelly & Clark Glymour (1989). Convergence to the Truth and Nothing but the Truth. Philosophy of Science 56 (2):185-220.score: 30.0
    One construal of convergent realism is that for each clear question, scientific inquiry eventually answers it. In this paper we adapt the techniques of formal learning theory to determine in a precise manner the circumstances under which this ideal is achievable. In particular, we define two criteria of convergence to the truth on the basis of evidence. The first, which we call EA convergence, demands that the theorist converge to the complete truth "all at once". The second, which we call (...)
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  37. Eugene Kelly (2008). Material Value-Ethics: Max Scheler and Nicolai Hartmann. Philosophy Compass 3 (1):1-16.score: 30.0
  38. Erin Kelly & Lionel McPherson (2001). On Tolerating the Unreasonable. Journal of Political Philosophy 9 (1):38–55.score: 30.0
  39. Michael R. Kelly (2008). Husserl, Deleuzean Bergsonism and the Sense of the Past in General. Husserl Studies 24 (1):15-30.score: 30.0
    Those familiar with contemporary continental philosophy know well the defenses Husserlians have offered of Husserl’s theory of inner time-consciousness against post-modernism’s deconstructive criticisms. As post-modernism gives way to Deleuzean post-structuralism, Deleuze’s Le bergsonisme has grown into the movement of Bergsonism. This movement, designed to present an alternative to phenomenology, challenges Husserlian phenomenology by criticizing the most “important… of all phenomenological problems.” Arguing that Husserl’s theory of time-consciousness detailed a linear succession of iterable instants in which the now internal to consciousness (...)
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  40. Geoffrey O. Dean & Ivan W. Kelly (2003). Is Astrology Relevant to Consciousness and Psi? Journal of Consciousness Studies 10 (6):175-198.score: 30.0
    Abstract: Many astrologers attribute a successful birth-chart reading to what they call intuition or psychic ability,where the birth chart acts like a crystal ball. As in shamanism,they relate consciousness to a transcendent reality that,if true, might require are-assessment of present biological theories of consciousness.In Western countries roughly 1 person in 10,000 is practising or seriously studying astrology, so their total number is substantial. Many tests of astrologers have been made since the 1950s but only recently has a coherent review been (...)
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  41. Erin I. Kelly (2005). Ethical Disagreement in Theory and Practice. Journal of Social Philosophy 36 (3):382–387.score: 30.0
  42. Donald Borrett, Sean D. Kelly & Hon Kwan (2000). Phenomenology, Dynamical Neural Networks and Brain Function. Philosophical Psychology 13 (2):213-228.score: 30.0
    Current cognitive science models of perception and action assume that the objects that we move toward and perceive are represented as determinate in our experience of them. A proper phenomenology of perception and action, however, shows that we experience objects indeterminately when we are perceiving them or moving toward them. This indeterminacy, as it relates to simple movement and perception, is captured in the proposed phenomenologically based recurrent network models of brain function. These models provide a possible foundation from which (...)
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  43. Michael Kelly (1996). Public Art Controversy: The Serra and Lin Cases. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 54 (1):15-22.score: 30.0
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  44. Thomas Kelly (2007). Evidence and Normativity: Reply to Leite. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 75 (2):465–474.score: 30.0
    According to one view about the rationality of belief, such rationality is ultimately nothing other than the rationality that one exhibits in taking the means to one’s ends. On this view, epistemic rationality is really a species or special case of instrumental rationality. In particular, epistemic rationality is instrumental rationality in the service of one’s distinctively cognitive or epistemic goals (perhaps: one’s goal of holding true rather than false beliefs). In my (2003), I dubbed this view the instrumentalist conception of (...)
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  45. Christopher Mole & Sean D. Kelly (2006). On the Demonstration of Blindsight in Monkeys. Mind and Language 21 (4):475-483.score: 30.0
    The work of Alan Cowey and Petra Stoerig is often taken to have shown that, following lesions analogous to those that cause blindsight in humans, there is blindsight in monkeys. The present paper reveals a problem in Cowey and Stoerig's case for blindsight in monkeys. The problem is that Cowey and Stoerig's results would only provide good evidence for blindsight if there is no difference between their two experimental paradigms with regard to the sorts of stimuli that are likely to (...)
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  46. Erin I. Kelly & Lionel K. McPherson (2007). Prisoner's Mistrust. Ratio 20 (1):57–70.score: 30.0
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  47. John E. Kelly (2004). Solidarity and Subsidiarity: "Organizing Principles" for Corporate Moral Leadership in the New Global Economy. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 52 (3):283-295.score: 30.0
    One of the crucial intellectual and social challenges facing corporation leaders is to foster a new way of thinking about business and society which recognizes the multinational corporation as a key player in society's responsibility to support and maintain fairness in the global reorganization of markets. In order to establish a sound global social economy, we are in need of the organizing and directing principles of solidarity and subsidiarity. Both of these principles speak to the need of transforming our public (...)
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  48. Mark Wrathall & Sean Kelly (1996). Existential Phenomenology and Cognitive Science. Electronic Journal of Analytic Philosophy (4).score: 30.0
    [1] In _What Computers Can't Do_ (1972), Hubert Dreyfus identified several basic assumptions about the nature of human knowledge which grounded contemporary research in cognitive science. Contemporary artificial intelligence, he argued, relied on an unjustified belief that the mind functions like a digital computer using symbolic manipulations ("the psychological assumption") (Dreyfus 1992: 163ff), or at least that computer programs could be understood as formalizing human thought ("the epistemological assumption") (Dreyfus 1992: 189). In addition, the project depended upon an assumption about (...)
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  49. Chris Kelly (2008). The Impossibility of Incommensurable Values. Philosophical Studies 137 (3):369 - 382.score: 30.0
    Many recent attacks on consequentialism and several defenses of pluralism have relied on arguments for the incommensurability of value. Such arguments have, generally, turned on empirical appeals to aspects of our everyday experience of value conflict. My intention, largely, is to bypass these arguments and turn instead to a discussion of the conceptual apparatus needed to make the claim that values are incommensurable. After delineating what it would mean for values to be incommensurable, I give an a priori argument that (...)
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  50. Sean D. Kelly (1999). What Do We See (When We Do)? Philosophical Topics 27 (2):107-28.score: 30.0
    1. The philosophical problem of what we see My topic revolves around what is apparently a very basic question. Stripped of all additions and in its leanest, most economical form, this is the question: "What do we see?" But in this most basic form the question admits of at least three different interpretations. In the first place, one might understand it to be an epistemological question, perhaps one with skeptical overtones. "What do we see?", on this reading, is short for (...)
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