Search results for 'Food supply. [from old catalog' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. J. R. Bellerby (1965). Farm Animal Welfare and World Food. London, One World Publications.score: 855.0
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  2. David Burch, Jane Dixon & Geoffrey Lawrence (2013). Introduction to Symposium on the Changing Role of Supermarkets in Global Supply Chains: From Seedling to Supermarket: Agri-Food Supply Chains in Transition. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 30 (2):215-224.score: 423.0
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  3. Cheryl Lyn Dybas (2009). Report From the 2009 AIBS Annual Meeting: Ensuring a Food Supply in a World That's Hot, Packed, and Starving. BioScience 59 (8):640-646.score: 423.0
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  4. Cheryl Lyn Dybas (2009). Report From the 2009 AIBS Annual Meeting: Ensuring a Food Supply in a World That's Hot, Packed, and Starving. BioScience 59 (8):640-646.score: 423.0
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  5. John Lindberg (forthcoming). Food Supply Under a Program of Freedom From Want. Social Research.score: 423.0
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  6. Michael J. Maloni & Michael E. Brown (2006). Corporate Social Responsibility in the Supply Chain: An Application in the Food Industry. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 68 (1):35 - 52.score: 336.6
    The food industry faces many significant risks from public criticism of corporate social responsibility (CSR) issues in the supply chain. This paper draws upon previous research and emerging industry trends to develop a comprehensive framework of supply chain CSR in the industry. The framework details unique CSR applications in the food supply chain including animal welfare, biotechnology, environment, fair trade, health and safety, and labor and human rights. General supply chain CSR issues such as community and procurement are (...)
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  7. David Barling (2007). Food Supply Chain Governance and Public Health Externalities: Upstream Policy Interventions and the UK State. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 20 (3):285-300.score: 300.6
    Contemporary food supply chains are generating externalities with high economic and social costs, notably in public health terms through the rise in diet-related non-communicable disease. The UK State is developing policy strategies to tackle these public health problems alongside intergovernmental responses. However, the governance of food supply chains is conducted by, and across, both private and public spheres and within a multilevel framework. The realities of contemporary food governance are that private interests are key drivers of (...) supply chains and have institutionalized a great deal of standards-setting and quality, notably from their locations in the downstream and midstream sectors. The UK State is designing some downstream and some midstream interventions to ameliorate the public health impacts of current food consumption patterns in England. The UK State has not addressed upstream interventions towards public health diet at the primary food production and processing stages, although traditionally it has shaped agricultural policy. Within the realities of contemporary multilevel governance, the UK State must act within the contexts set by the international regimes of the Common Agricultural Policy and the World Trade Organization agreements, notably on agriculture. The potential for further upstream agricultural policy reform is considered as part of a wider policy approach to address the public health externalities issuing from contemporary food supply chains within this multilevel governance context. (shrink)
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  8. Lyndal-Joy Thompson & Stewart Lockie (2013). Private Standards, Grower Networks, and Power in a Food Supply System. Agriculture and Human Values 30 (3):379-388.score: 282.6
    The role of private food standards in agriculture is increasingly raising questions of legitimacy, particularly in light of the impacts such standards may have on food producers. While much work has been carried out at a macro policy level for developing countries, there have been relatively few empirical case studies that focus on particular food supply chains, and even fewer studies still of the impact of private standards on developed countries such as Australia. This study seeks to (...)
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  9. Roberta Sebastiani, Francesca Montagnini & Daniele Dalli (2013). Ethical Consumption and New Business Models in the Food Industry. Evidence From the Eataly Case. Journal of Business Ethics 114 (3):473-488.score: 279.0
    Individual and collective ethical stances regarding ethical consumption and related outcomes are usually seen as both a form of concern about extant market offerings and as opportunities to develop new offerings. In this sense, demand and supply are traditionally portrayed as interacting dialectically on the basis of extant business models. In general, this perspective implicitly assumes the juxtaposition of demand side ethical stances and supply side corporate initiatives. The Eataly story describes, however, a different approach to market transformation; in this (...)
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  10. H. D. Westlake (1948). Athenian Food Supplies From Euboea. The Classical Review 62 (01):2-5.score: 232.0
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  11. Patricia Allen & Julie Guthman (2006). From “Old School” to “Farm-to-School”: Neoliberalization From the Ground Up. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 23 (4):401-415.score: 225.0
    Farm-to-school (FTS) programs have garnered the attentions and energies of people in a diverse array of social locations in the food system and are serving as a sort of touchstone for many in the alternative agrifood movement. Yet, unlike other alternative agrifood initiatives, FTS programs intersect directly with the long-established institution of the welfare state, including its vestiges of New Deal farm programs and public entitlement. This paper explores how FTS is navigating the liminal terrain of public and private (...)
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  12. M. Y. Rady & J. L. Verheijde (2012). Distress From Voluntary Refusal of Food and Fluids to Hasten Death: What is the Role of Continuous Deep Sedation? Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (8):510-512.score: 216.0
    In assisted dying, the end-of-life trajectory is shortened to relieve unbearable suffering. Unbearable suffering is defined broadly enough to include cognitive (early dementia), psychosocial or existential distress. It can include old-age afflictions that are neither life-threatening nor fatal in the “vulnerable elderly”. The voluntary refusal of food and fluids (VRFF) combined with continuous deep sedation (CDS) for assisted dying is legal. Scientific understanding of awareness of internal and external nociceptive stimuli under CDS is rudimentary. CDS may blunt the wakefulness (...)
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  13. Dirk Roep & Johannes Wiskerke (2012). On Governance, Embedding and Marketing: Reflections on the Construction of Alternative Sustainable Food Networks. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 25 (2):205-221.score: 208.8
    Based on the reconstruction of the development of 14 food supply chain initiatives in 7 European countries, we developed a conceptual framework that demonstrates that the process of increasing the sustainability of food supply chains is rooted in strategic choices regarding governance , embedding, and marketing and in the coordination of these three dimensions that are inextricably interrelated. The framework also shows that when seeking to further develop an initiative (e.g., through scaling up or product diversification) these interrelations (...)
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  14. Franck L. B. Meijboom, Tatjana Visak & Frans W. A. Brom (2006). From Trust to Trustworthiness: Why Information is Not Enough in the Food Sector. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 19 (5):427-442.score: 156.0
    The many well-publicized food scandals in recent years have resulted in a general state of vulnerable trust. As a result, building consumer trust has become an important goal in agri-food policy. In their efforts to protect trust in the agricultural and food sector, governments and industries have tended to consider the problem of trust as merely a matter of informing consumers on risks. In this article, we argue that the food sector better addresses the problem of (...)
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  15. David J. Doorey (2011). The Transparent Supply Chain: From Resistance to Implementation at Nike and Levi-Strauss. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 103 (4):587-603.score: 156.0
    Information disclosure is a common regulatory tool designed to influence business behavior. A belief is that transparency can provoke learning and also positive institutional change by empowering private watchdogs to monitor and pressure business leaders to alter harmful behavior. Beginning in the late 1990s, a private movement emerged that pressured corporations to disclose the identify of their global supplier factories. These activists believed that factory disclosure would lead to greater accountability by corporations for the working conditions under which their products (...)
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  16. Ian Werkheiser & Samantha Noll (2014). From Food Justice to a Tool of the Status Quo: Three Sub-Movements Within Local Food. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 27 (2):201-210.score: 156.0
    The local food movement has been touted by some as a profoundly effective way to make our food system become more healthy, just, and sustainable. Others have criticized the movement as being less a challenge to the status quo and more an easily co-opted support offering just another set of choices for affluent consumers. In this paper, we analyze three distinct sub-movements within the local food movement, the individual-focused sub-movement, the systems-focused sub-movement, and the community-focused sub-movement. These (...)
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  17. Hugh Campbell (2009). Breaking New Ground in Food Regime Theory: Corporate Environmentalism, Ecological Feedbacks and the 'Food From Somewhere' Regime? [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 26 (4):309-319.score: 156.0
    Early food regimes literature tended to concentrate on the global scale analysis of implicitly negative trends in global food relations. In recent years, early food regimes authors like Harriet Friedmann and Philip McMichael have begun to consider the sites of resistance, difference and opportunity that have been emerging around, and into contestation with, new food regime relations. This paper examines the emerging global-scale governance mechanism of environmental food auditing—particularly those being promoted by supermarkets and other (...)
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  18. Daniel R. Block, Noel Chávez, Erika Allen & Dinah Ramirez (2012). Food Sovereignty, Urban Food Access, and Food Activism: Contemplating the Connections Through Examples From Chicago. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 29 (2):203-215.score: 156.0
    The idea of food sovereignty has its roots primarily in the response of small producers in developing countries to decreasing levels of control over land, production practices, and food access. While the concerns of urban Chicagoans struggling with low food access may seem far from these issues, the authors believe that the ideas associated with food sovereignty will lead to the construction of solutions to what is often called the “food desert” issue that serve and (...)
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  19. Gail Feenstra (2002). Creating Space for Sustainable Food Systems: Lessons From the Field. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 19 (2):99-106.score: 156.0
    In response to growing trendsin the current food system toward globalintegration, economic consolidation, andenvironmental degradation, communities haveinitiated alternative, more sustainable foodand agricultural systems. Lessons may now belearned about the development and maintenanceof local, sustainable food systems projects –those that attempt to integrate theenvironmental, economic, and social health oftheir food systems in particular places. Fourkinds of space need to be created and protected– social space, political space, intellectualspace, and economic space. Three importantthemes emerge from these community spaces:public participation, (...)
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  20. Suk Shin Kim (2014). The Mini-Cup Jelly Court Cases: A Comparative Analysis From a Food Ethics Perspective. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 27 (5):735-748.score: 156.0
    This study compares and analyzes separate court rulings in three countries on “mini-cup jelly” (a firm jelly containing konjac and packaged in bite-sized plastic cups) from a food ethics perspective. While the Korean and US courts decided that the mini-cup jelly was defective, and that the manufacturers or importers were liable for damages in these cases, the Japanese court took an opposing stance in favor of the manufacturer. However, from an absolute and fundamental viewpoint, the jelly was unacceptable, ethically (...)
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  21. Bill Pritchard (2009). The Long Hangover From the Second Food Regime: A World-Historical Interpretation of the Collapse of the WTO Doha Round. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 26 (4):297-307.score: 156.0
    A benchmark question in contemporary food regimes scholarship is how to theorize agriculture’s incorporation into the WTO. For the most part, it has been theorized as an institutional mechanism that facilitates the ushering in of a new, so-called ‘third food regime’, in which food–society relations are governed by the overarching politics of the market. The collapse of the Doha Round negotiations in July 2008 makes it possible, for the first time, to offer a conclusive assessment as to (...)
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  22. Andy Thorpe & Catherine Robinson (2004). When Goliaths Clash: US and EU Differences Over the Labeling of Food Products Derived From Genetically Modified Organisms. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 21 (4):287-298.score: 156.0
    There is a fundamental divergence of opinion between the EU and the US over how food products derived from genetically modified organisms should be labeled. This has less to do with safety, as moves towards the international harmonization of safety standards continue apace, and rather more to do with the consumers' right to know about the origins of the food they are consuming. This paper uses a framework drawn from the global public goods (GPG) literature of economics and (...)
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  23. Jane Dixon (2009). From the Imperial to the Empty Calorie: How Nutrition Relations Underpin Food Regime Transitions. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 26 (4):321-333.score: 156.0
    This article works in a recursive manner by using the tools of a food regime approach to reinterpret the nutrition transition that has been underway internationally for 100 years, and then describing the contributions of nutrition science to the 1st and 2nd Food Regimes and the passages between Food Regimes. The resulting history—from the ‘imperial calorie’ through the ‘protective’ vitamin to the ‘empty calorie’—illuminates a neglected dimension to food regime theorising: the role of socio-technical systems in (...)
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  24. Libby Hattersley (2013). Agri-Food System Transformations and Diet-Related Chronic Disease in Australia: A Nutrition-Oriented Value Chain Approach. Agriculture and Human Values 30 (2):299-309.score: 153.0
    Attention has become increasingly focused in recent years on the role agri-food system transformations have played in driving the global diet-related chronic disease burden. Identifying the role played by the food-consuming industries (predominantly large manufacturers, processors, distributors, and retailers) in particular, and identifying possibilities to facilitate healthier diets through intervening in these industries, have been identified as a research priority. This paper explores the potential for one promising analytic framework—the nutrition-oriented value chain approach—to contribute to this area, drawing (...)
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  25. Chery Smith, Jamie Butterfass & Rickelle Richards (2010). Environment Influences Food Access and Resulting Shopping and Dietary Behaviors Among Homeless Minnesotans Living in Food Deserts. Agriculture and Human Values 27 (2):141-161.score: 147.6
    Qualitative and quantitative methods were used to investigate how shopping behaviors and environment influence dietary intake and weight status among homeless Minnesotans living in food deserts. Seven focus groups (n = 53) and a quantitative survey (n = 255), using the social cognitive theory as the theoretical framework, were conducted at two homeless shelters (S1 and S2) in the Twin Cities area. Heights, weights, and 24-h dietary recalls were also collected. Food stores within a five-block radius of the (...)
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  26. Barbara Seed, Tim Lang, Martin Caraher & Aleck Ostry (2013). Integrating Food Security Into Public Health and Provincial Government Departments in British Columbia, Canada. Agriculture and Human Values 30 (3):457-470.score: 147.6
    Food security policy, programs, and infrastructure have been incorporated into Public Health and other areas of the Provincial Government in British Columbia, including the adoption of food security as a Public Health Core Program. A policy analysis of the integration into Public Health is completed by merging findings from 48 key informant interviews conducted with government, civil society, and food supply chain representatives involved in the initiatives along with relevant documents and participant/direct observations. The paper then examines (...)
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  27. David Burch & Geoffrey Lawrence (2009). Towards a Third Food Regime: Behind the Transformation. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 26 (4):267-279.score: 147.6
    Food regime theory focuses upon the dynamics, and agents, of change in capitalist food and farming systems. Its exponents have been able to identify relatively stable periods of capital accumulation in the agri-food industries, along with the periods of transition. Recently, scholars have argued that—following a first food regime based upon colonial trade in bulk commodities like wheat and sugar, and a second food regime typified by industrial agriculture and manufactured foods—there is an emerging third (...)
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  28. Quentin Farmar-Bowers (2014). Food Security: One of a Number of ‘Securities’ We Need for a Full Life: An Australian Perspective. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 27 (5):811-829.score: 147.6
    Although agriculture in Australia is very productive, the current food supply systems in Australia fail to deliver healthy diets to all Australians and fail to protect the natural resources on which they depend. The operation of the food systems creates ‘collateral damage’ to the natural environment including biodiversity loss. In coming decades, Australia’s food supply systems will be increasingly challenged by resource price inflation and climate change. Australia exports more than half of its current agricultural production. Government (...)
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  29. Jerome R. Ravetz (2002). Food Safety, Quality, and Ethics – a Post-Normal Perspective. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 15 (3):255-265.score: 144.0
    I argue that the issues of foodquality, in the most general sense includingpurity, safety, and ethics, can no longer beresolved through ``normal'' science andregulation. The reliance on reductionistscience as the basis for policy andimplementation has shown itself to beinadequate. I use several borderline examplesbetween drugs and foods, particularly coffeeand sucrose, to show that ``quality'' is now acomplex attribute. For in those cases thesubstance is either a pure drug, or a bad foodwith drug-like properties; both are marketed asif they were foods. (...)
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  30. Ben Mepham (2013). Food Ethics. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 10 (2):249-251.score: 144.0
    None of us can avoid being interested in food. Our very existence depends on the supply of safe, nutritious foods. It is then hardly surprising that food has become the focus of a wide range of ethical concerns: Is the food we buy safe? Is it produced by means which respect the welfare of animals and sustain the land? Are modern biotechnologies employed in food production immoral? This book addresses such issues by applying ethical principles to (...)
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  31. Valerie Tarasuk & Joan M. Eakin (2005). Food Assistance Through “Surplus” Food: Insights From an Ethnographic Study of Food Bank Work. Agriculture and Human Values 22 (2):177-186.score: 144.0
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  32. Rainbow A. Vogt & Lucia L. Kaiser (2008). Still a Time to Act: A Review of Institutional Marketing of Regionally-Grown Food. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 25 (2):241-255.score: 144.0
    Regional institutional marketing supports sustainable farming by bringing wholesome, nutritious food to members of the community. Schools, in particular, can benefit greatly from this arrangement in comprehensive efforts to address childhood obesity. Nineteen previous publications examined issues around supply of and/or demand for regional food procurement by institutions across the United States, including levels of interest, perceived benefits, and barriers to this arrangement. Food service directors, farmers, and/or distributors participated in surveys, interviews, workshops/forums, case studies, and one (...)
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  33. Emiko Konishi, Anne J. Davis & Toshiaki Aiba (2002). The Ethics of Withdrawing Artificial Food and Fluid From Terminally Ill Patients: An End-of-Life Dilemma for Japanese Nurses and Families. Nursing Ethics 9 (1):7-19.score: 144.0
    End-of-life issues have become an urgent problem in Japan, where people are among the longest lived in the world and most of them die while connected to high-technology medical equipment. This study examines a sensitive end-of-life ethical issue that concerns patients, families and nurses: the withdrawal of artificial food and fluid from terminally ill patients. A sample of 160 Japanese nurses, who completed a questionnaire that included forced-choice and open-ended questions, supported this act under only two specific conditions: if (...)
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  34. A. Whitney Sanford (2011). Growing Stories From India: Religion and the Fate of Agriculture. University Press of Kentucky.score: 133.2
    The ecological imagination: from paradigm to practice -- Narratives of agriculture: how did we get here? -- Balaram and the Yamuna River: entitlement and presumptions of control -- Borrowing Balaram: alternative narratives -- The festival of Holi: celebrating agricultural and social health -- The land in between: constructing nature, wilderness, and agriculture -- Restoration, reciprocity, and repair: revising the ecological imagination.
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  35. Jennifer L. Wilkins (2005). Eating Right Here: Moving From Consumer to Food Citizen. Agriculture and Human Values 22 (3):269-273.score: 132.0
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  36. Daniel L. Childers, Jessica Corman, Mark Edwards & James J. Elser (2011). Sustainability Challenges of Phosphorus and Food: Solutions From Closing the Human Phosphorus Cycle. BioScience 61 (2):117-124.score: 132.0
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  37. Zachary B. Herrnstadt (forthcoming). Neil Reid, Jay D. Gatrell and Paula S. Ross (Eds): Local Food Systems in Old Industrial Regions: Concepts, Spatial Context, and Local Practices. Agriculture and Human Values.score: 132.0
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  38. Corinne Valdivia (2001). Gender, Livestock Assets, Resource Management, and Food Security: Lessons From the SR-CRSP. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 18 (1):27-39.score: 132.0
    North Sumatra and West Java in Indonesia, the Andes of Bolivia and Peru, Western Province, the Coast and Machakos in Kenya, were Small Ruminant Collaborative Research Support Program (SR-CRSP) sites in which the role of small ruminants was studied and where technological interventions were designed. In all cases the target groups were poor rural households that could maintain sheep, goats, or South American camelids. The objective was to increase the welfare of families through the use of small ruminant technologies. Access (...)
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  39. Ileana F. Szymanski (2009). Choices in Food and Happiness Seen From the Perspective of Aristotle's Notion of Habit. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 16 (2):12-21.score: 126.0
    In our daily life we develop habits that, being constantly practiced, become part of who we are. Two areas in which we develop habits are the evaluation of sources of food, and the evaluation of sources of happiness. It is my contention that the habits developed in those areas could affect one another. Thus, acquiring good habits in one area is of utmost importance to develop the other one. Conversely, if we develop the bad habit of picky eating this (...)
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  40. Lawrence Busch (2011). The Private Governance of Food: Equitable Exchange or Bizarre Bazaar? [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 28 (3):345-352.score: 126.0
    In recent years, we have witnessed three parallel and intertwined trends: First, food retail and processing firms have embraced private standards, usually with some form of third party certification employed to verify adherence to those standards. Second, firms have increasingly aligned themselves with, as opposed to fighting off, environmental, fair trade, and other NGOs. Third, firms have embraced supply chain management as a strategy for increasing profits and market share. Together, these trends are part and parcel of the neoliberal (...)
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  41. André Sobczak (2006). Are Codes of Conduct in Global Supply Chains Really Voluntary? From Soft Law Regulation of Labour Relations to Consumer Law. Business Ethics Quarterly 16 (2):167-184.score: 126.0
    Abstract: Labour and employment law no longer has a monopoly on regulating labour relations and is facing a crisis as its effectiveness is questioned. Codes of conduct adopted by companies to recognise their social responsibility for the global supply chain are instruments that can usefully complement labour and employment law. The aim of this paper is to analyse in depth the legal nature of codes of conduct and their impact on labour and employment law. Will the use of codes of (...)
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  42. Bin Jiang (2009). Implementing Supplier Codes of Conduct in Global Supply Chains: Process Explanations From Theoretic and Empirical Perspectives. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 85 (1):77 - 92.score: 126.0
    Western buying companies impose Supplier Codes of Conduct (SCC) on their suppliers in developing countries; however, many suppliers cannot fully comply with SCC and some of them even cheat in SCC. In this research, we link contract characteristics - price pressure, production complexity, contract duration - to the likelihood of supplier's commitment to SCC through a mediating process: how the buying companies govern their suppliers. Our structural equation model analysis shows that the hierarchy/relational norms governance is a perfect mediator of (...)
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  43. Richard Sosis (2004). Insights From Ifaluk: Food Sharing Among Cooperative Fishers. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (4):568-569.score: 126.0
    The fish-sharing patterns on Ifaluk Atoll underscore several limitations of the explanations of food sharing offered by Gurven and suggest that non-foraging labor activities may provide insights into reciprocity and punishment relevant for understanding food-sharing patterns. I also argue that future food-sharing studies should focus on signaling rather than resource holding potential (RHP).
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  44. Filiep Vanhonacker & Wim Verbeke (2014). Public and Consumer Policies for Higher Welfare Food Products: Challenges and Opportunities. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 27 (1):153-171.score: 126.0
    Farm animal welfare in livestock production is a topical and important issue attracting growing interest of policy makers, consumers, stakeholders in the supply chain and others. While there is much public interest in the issue this is not reflected in the supply and market shares of animal food products that are produced under welfare standards that exceed legislative requirements. Given the obstacles to devising stricter legislative standards, higher welfare animal food products are mostly made available through market-based approaches. (...)
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  45. Howard Harris (2007). Lessons in Corporate Culture From the Oil-For-Food Scandal. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 18:45-49.score: 126.0
    Australia’s monopoly grain exporter, AWB, was the largest provider of kickbacks to Saddam Hussein’s regime under the United Nations Oil-for-Food program.The full extent of AWB’s complicity and the failure of its corporate culture became apparent as a result of two inquiries, commissioned by the United Nations and the Australian Government, both of which operated with almost complete transparency. The paper examines the nature of transparency – as virtue, duty, technique and outcome – and uses the Oil-for-Food inquiries as (...)
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  46. Juliet B. Schor & Margaret Ford (2007). From Tastes Great to Cool: Children's Food Marketing and the Rise of the Symbolic. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 35 (1):10-21.score: 120.0
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  47. James W. Garrison & Bruce W. Watson (2005). Food From Thought. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 19 (4):242-256.score: 120.0
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  48. Mika Lavaque-Manty (2001). Food, Functioning and Justice: From Famines to Eating Disorders. Journal of Political Philosophy 9 (2):150–167.score: 120.0
  49. Stanley J. Ulijaszek (2012). Food Chains, Geographies and Eating Right. Three Books on Food Systems. In Defence of Food. The Myth of Nutrition and the Pleasures of Eating. By Michael Pollan. Pp. 256.(Penguin Books, London, 2009.)£ 9.99, ISBN 9780141034720, Paperback. Hungry City. How Food Shapes Our Lives. By Carolyn Steel. Pp. 400.(Vintage Books, 2009.)£ 9.99, ISBN 9780099531685, Paperback. Stuffed & Starved. From Farm to Fork, the Hidden Battle for the World Food System. By Raj Patel. Pp. 448.(Portobello Books, London, 2008.)£ 8.99, ISBN 9781846270116, Paperback. [REVIEW] Journal of Biosocial Science 44 (4):509-511.score: 120.0
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  50. Michael D. Bayles (1983). Criminal Law, The General Part: Liability and Defences Law Reform Commission of Canada Working Paper 29 Ottawa: Minister of Supply and Services Canada, 1982. Pp. Vii, 204. Free From LRCC. [REVIEW] Dialogue 22 (03):553-555.score: 120.0
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