Search results for 'Fourrures Commerce' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Richard C. Hoffmann (1982). Le Commerce des Fourrures En Occident À la Fin du Moyen 'Ge Robert Delort. Speculum 57 (2):365-367.
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  2. Alan Herscovici (1985). Second Nature: The Animal-Rights Controversy. Stoddart.
     
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  3.  10
    Jane Jacobs (1994). Systems of Survival: A Dialogue on the Moral Foundations of Commerce and Politics. Vintage Books.
    The author of The Death and Life of Great American Cities looks at business fraud and criminal enterprise, overextended government farm subsidies and zealous transit police, to show what happens when the moral systems of commerce collide with those of politics.
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  4.  5
    David Bevan & Patricia Werhane (2015). The Inexorable Sociality of Commerce: The Individual and Others in Adam Smith. Journal of Business Ethics 127 (2):327-335.
    In this paper we reconsider Adam Smith’s ethics, what he means by self-interest and the role this plays in the famous “invisible hand.” Our efforts focus in part on the misreading of “the invisible hand” by certain economists with a view to legitimizing their neoclassical economic paradigm. Through exegesis and by reference to notions that are developed in Smith’s two major works, we deconstruct Smith’s ideas of conscience, justice, self-interest, and the invisible hand. We amplify Smith’s insistence, through his notions (...)
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  5.  10
    André Azevedo Alves & José Manuel Moreira (2013). Virtue and Commerce in Domingo de Soto's Thought: Commercial Practices, Character, and the Common Good. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 113 (4):627-638.
    This paper draws from the work of sixteenth century theologian, philosopher, and ethicist Domingo de Soto and considers his virtue-based approach to the ethical evaluation of commerce within an Aristotelian–Thomistic framework for the articulation of business and the common good. Particular attention is given to the fundamental emphasis placed by Soto in distinguishing between commerce as an activity and the specific conduct of persons engaging in commercial activity. The distinction between the material and the formal parts of the (...)
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  6.  25
    Charles P. Koerber (2009). Corporate Responsibility Standards: Current Implications and Future Possibilities for Peace Through Commerce. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 89 (4):461 - 480.
    Calls for greater corporate responsibility have resulted in the creation of various extralegal mechanisms to shape corporate behavior. The number and popularity of corporate responsibility standards has grown tremendously in the last three decades. Current estimates suggest there may be over 300 standards that address various aspects of corporate behavior and responsibility (e. g., working conditions, human rights, protection of the natural environment, transparency, bribery). However, little is known about how these standards relate directly to the notion of peace through (...)
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  7.  20
    Marc Lavine (2009). From Scholarly Dialogue to Social Movement: Considerations and Implications for Peace Through Commerce. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 89 (4):603 - 615.
    While Peace through Commerce (PTC) started as a conversation among a small group of scholars it has grown into an increasingly robust movement, giving rise to conferences, books, journal articles, and dialogue between scholars, managers, practitioners, government officials, and civil society actors, all of whom share an interest in the potential of commerce to foster greater peace. Because social movement scholarship explores the ability of collective interests to achieve social change it provides a useful lens through which to (...)
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  8.  15
    Michelle Westermann-Behaylo (2009). Institutionalizing Peace Through Commerce: Engagement or Divestment in South African and Sudan. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 89 (4):417 - 434.
    Peace through Commerce literature has discussed how business can engage in more responsible behavior in order to mitigate conflict risk and promote conflict resolution. However, in many conflict situations, the question arises at what point does it become impossible for a firm to remain engaged on the ground and still function as an ethical business? This article discusses the role of divestment activist groups in changing institutional norms among MNCs operating in conflict situations. Institutional norms shift from firms conducting (...)
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  9.  5
    Nelson Oly Ndubisi (2007). Evaluating Non-Business E-Commerce Adoption Decision Processes and Gender Roles. AI and Society 21 (3):287-302.
    Non-business e-commerce adoption refers to the use of e-commerce by not-for profit organizations such as religious organizations, government agencies and academic institutions to reduce their expenses or to improve their operations and customer service. Being a new research niche in the field of e-commerce, non-business e-commerce has received very little or no research attention. This has resulted in a very poor understanding of this niche, especially with regards to its adoption facilitators and inhibitors. Based on this (...)
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  10.  14
    John Forrer (2009). Locating Peace Through Commerce in Good Global Governance. Journal of Business Ethics 89 (4):449 - 460.
    Peace Through Commerce (PTC) is expanding its influence on the formulation of business strategies for responding to challenges found in conflict and post-conflict zones. A review of practical guidance available on successful PTC business practices shows it is more general than particular and short on detailed recommendations. In addition, such recommendations say little about how globalization is transforming the forms and processes of global governance and their implications for PTC strategies. An assessment of the changing landscape of global governance (...)
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  11.  11
    Ginger Smith, Andrea Cahn & Sybil Ford (2009). Sports Commerce and Peace: The Special Case of the Special Olympics. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 89 (4):587 - 602.
    Today's sports commerce not only expands the number of international mega-sports events but also increases their value in effecting social change and promoting world peace. As athletes and spectators come together in ever-larger numbers, governments must collaborate with non-governmental, private, and non-profit sectors to develop and implement the business of sports commerce benefiting host nations and local communities. This research identifies the relationship between sports commerce and peace as worthy of greater study. This article examines the role (...)
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  12.  2
    Maxime Rovere (2007). Avoir commerce : Spinoza et les modes de l'échange. Astérion 5.
    Spinoza n’a pas élaboré de grande pensée sur le commerce, mais il l’a activement pratiqué. Le présent article mesure l’impact de cette pratique sur sa philosophie politique, en prenant en compte la manière dont l’histoire des idées s’articule à l’histoire de l’auteur, et en suivant comment l’élaboration d’une métaphysique du commerce le conduit à évacuer le négoce de son anthropologie.
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  13.  12
    Mary D. Maury & Deborah S. Kleiner (2002). E-Commerce, Ethical Commerce? Journal of Business Ethics 36 (1-2):21 - 31.
    In this paper, we look at the new frontier of e-commerce, the ethical challenges it is facing and discuss some of the problems encountered and some of the solutions that are evolving. The areas of concern include the impact on other businesses, investors and consumers. Problems regarding financial reporting, intellectual property and privacy are discussed.
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  14.  14
    Beverly Kracher & Cynthia L. Corritore (2004). Is There a Special E-Commerce Ethics? Business Ethics Quarterly 14 (1):71-94.
    The speed and degree to which e- commerce is infiltrating the very fabric of our society, faster and more pervasively than any other entity in history, makes an examination of its ethical dimensions critical. Though ethical lag has heretofore hindered ourexplorations of e- commerce ethics, it is now time to identify and confront them. In this paper we define e- commerce and describe thecharacteristics that set it apart from traditional brick and-mortar business. We then examine the ethical (...)
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  15. Marc A. Rodwin (2007). Medical Commerce, Physician Entrepreneurialism, and Conflicts of Interest. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 16 (4):387.
    Is medical commerce a recent phenomenon? Does it distort the patient–physician relationship? Are investor-owned firms the main source of medical commercialism? I contend that medicine has generally been commerce in the United States, that medical commerce is a problem when it creates or worsens physicians' conflicts of interest, and that these conflicts thrive in nonprofit organizations as well as in investor-owned firms. I provide a historical sketch to show that physician entrepreneurialism, rather than commerce generally, is (...)
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  16.  43
    L. Brace (2013). Inhuman Commerce: Anti-Slavery and the Ownership of Freedom. European Journal of Political Theory 12 (4):466-482.
    This article explores the British anti-slavery writings of the mid- to late 18th century, and the meanings which they gave to the idea of owning a property in the person. It addresses the construction of a particular moral and political landscape where freedom was understood as both a kind of property and as non-domination, and slavery was constructed as a form of theft, and as the exercise of arbitrary power. This created a complex moral space, where possession, commerce, savagery, (...)
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  17.  9
    Thomas Hoeren (2005). Law, Ethics and Electronic Commerce. International Review of Information Ethics 3:06.
    Unlike the Internet community had expected electronic commerce does not lead to an anarchic dissolution of law. In the context of electronic trade, problems arising between users and providers can be solved, for instance by applying traditional principles of contract law. And yet, the legal dispute of Internet related facts and circumstances gives rise to a number of interesting topoi. Even though these subjects have already been considered in the past , they only now show their specific explosive effect (...)
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  18.  7
    Tamotsu Nishizawa (1996). Tokuzo Fukuda and Lujo Brentano: The Impact of the German Historical School on the Making of the Commerce University in Japan. The European Legacy 1 (2):791-795.
    (1996). Tokuzo Fukuda and Lujo Brentano: The impact of the German historical school on the making of the commerce university in Japan. The European Legacy: Vol. 1, Fourth International Conference of the International Society for the study of European Ideas, pp. 791-795.
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  19.  10
    J. Salter (1992). Adam Smith on Feudalism, Commerce and Slavery. History of Political Thought 13 (2):219.
    I will argue in what follows that the reading of Smith which attributes to him a theory of the transition from feudalism to capitalism, and the implications which follow from it, are unfounded. There are three key aspects of the interpretation which I will challenge. First, that Smith's account of the destruction of feudal power by the progress of commerce is related to an explanation of the transition to the commercial stage; second, that the decline in baronial power incorporates (...)
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  20.  4
    Laurent Erbs (2010). Cachez ce commerce que je ne saurais voir! Prostitution et société messine. Clio 1 (31):267-286.
    Au début des années 1930, la ville de Metz entreprend un projet de rénovation urbaine qui menace l’existence des maisons de tolérance. La gestion municipale de la prostitution en maisons closes semble bien souvent soumise aux pressions des notables alors que les rapports entre la société locale et la prostitution restent plus ambigus, comme en témoignent les lettres conservées dans les archives administratives qui font état de demandes de maintien de l’activité prostitutionnelle. Si les filles sont réprimées au quotidien, la (...)
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  21.  3
    D. A. Desserud (1991). Virtue, Commerce and Moderation in the 'Tale of the Troglodytes': Montesquieu's "Persian Letters". History of Political Thought 12 (4):605.
    Recent scholarship has stressed Montesquieu's theory of moderate politics, suggesting that these contradictions exist only when we assume that Montesquieu was extolling the merits of a specific species of government (democracy, aristocratic republic, or monarchy) rather than a type of government (moderate). But unresolved is the point at which Montesquieu became enamoured with moderate regimes. Without entering directly into this debate, I am proposing that an examination of the �Tale of the Troglodytes� reveals that Montesquieu's interest in moderate government extends (...)
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  22.  22
    M. Ali Khan (2004). Self-Interest, Self-Deception and the Ethics of Commerce. Journal of Business Ethics 52 (2):189-206.
    On taking the common distinction between the legal and the ethical as a point of departure, and in an effort to understand Marshall's approach to self-interest, and thereby to his conception of an ethics of commerce, I read three of his essays in the light of some non-technical writings of Frank Hahn and three other Cambridge intellectuals. My larger project connects self-interest and self-deception to a possible ethics of theorizing in economics, and thereby to the ethics of the relationship (...)
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  23.  22
    Stuart E. Levy & Donald E. Hawkins (2009). Peace Through Tourism: Commerce Based Principles and Practices. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 89 (4):569 - 585.
    While tourism's positive contributions to societies have long been debated, commerce based tourism activities can strengthen peaceful societies by adhering to sustainable tourism principles. This study utilizes content analysis to examine 136 tourism practices from four major awards programs for their contributions to sustainability and peace. Specific practices which illuminate each of these contributions are highlighted. The findings reveal the most common initiatives focus on environmental quality, economic development, and community nourishment efforts, with substantially less focus on initiatives to (...)
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  24.  6
    Michael A. Helfand & Barak D. Richman, The Challenge of Co-Religionist Commerce.
    This Article addresses the rise of "co-religionist commerce" in the United States—that is, the explosion of commercial dealings that take place between co-religionists who intend their transactions to achieve both commercial and religious objectives. To remain viable, coreligionist commerce requires all the legal support necessary to sustain all other commercial relationships. Contracts must be enforced, parties must be protected against torts, and disputes must be reliably adjudicated. Under current constitutional doctrine, co-religionist commercial agreements must be translated into secular (...)
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  25.  16
    Ryu Susato (2009). David Hume's Political Theory: Law, Commerce, and the Constitution of Government (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 47 (1):pp. 146-147.
    As its title suggests, this work provides a wide-ranging discussion and interpretation of David Hume’s political philosophy. McArthur’s main arguments are threefold. First, the watershed between civilized and barbarous societies for Hume lies in the establishment of the rule of law. According to the author, what Hume called a “civilized monarchy,” though falling short of the ideal republic, can be regarded as a civilized form of government. This is because Hume believed that, with the exception of the monarch him- or (...)
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  26.  16
    Jessica Litman (1999). Electronic Commerce and Free Speech. Ethics and Information Technology 1 (3):213-225.
    For commercial purveyors of digital speech, information and entertainment, the biggest threat posed by the Internet isn''t the threat of piracy, but the threat posed by free speech -- speech that doesn''t cost any money. Free speech has the potential to squeeze out expensive speech. A glut of high quality free stuff has the potential to run companies in the business of selling speech out of business. We haven''t had to worry about this before, because speaking in a meaningful way (...)
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  27.  17
    Patrick Giddy (2007). Does Character Matter? Guardian Values in an Age of Commerce. Theoria 54 (113):53-75.
    Standards of excellence in the sphere of work are often taken to be at odds with our ethical obligations in general. In an age of commerce little attention is paid to how the manner in which things are done impacts on the agent's character. Jane Jacobs' phenomenology of our moral intuitions about the public world of work reveal two frameworks, the 'commercial moral syndrome' stressing fairness, and the 'guardian moral syndrome' emphasizing loyalty. In the latter set of values we (...)
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  28.  5
    Emma Rothschild (2004). Global Commerce and the Question of Sovereignty in the Eighteenth-Century Provinces. Modern Intellectual History 1 (1):3-25.
    The paper is concerned with disputes over sovereignty and global commerce in the 1760s and 1770s. The eighteenth-century revolution in economic science has been identified with agricultural reforms, and with the definition of national economies. The economists of the time, including Turgot, Mirabeau, Dupont de Nemours, Baudeau and Adam Smith, were also intensely interested in the merchant sovereigns of the French, English and Dutch East India companies, and in the new colonial ventures of the post-Seven Years War period. Their (...)
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  29.  5
    Steven Skultety (2006). Currency, Trade, and Commerce in Plato's Laws. History of Political Thought 27 (2):189-205.
    This article examines the grounds for Plato's negative attitude towards trade, commerce and currency in the Laws. The author shows that commerce and trade are condemned because they are fundamentally private, and demonstrates that Plato rejects gold and silver currency because its use encourages a kind of cosmopolitanism. Rather than condemning the competitiveness or licentiousness of the economic sphere, Plato critiques it for turning the citizens' attention away from civic life.
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  30.  2
    Karine Douplitzky (2009). Le commerce du moi, modèle économique du profilage. Hermes 53:113.
    On n'a pas attendu le Net pour établir un commerce profitable des données personnelles. Depuis la vente par correspondance jusqu'aux cartes de fidélité, des milliers de fichiers sont venus grossir les bases de données des grandes marques qui stockent, nettoient et monnayent leurs informations clientèle. Dans le monde réel donc, il semble presque consensuel d'être fichés et démarchés par des enseignes. En revanche, sur le Net, les internautes semblent davantage inquiets du devenir des traces qu'ils laissent en ligne. Qu'est-ce (...)
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  31.  3
    Dominique Weber (2007). Le « commerce d'amour-propre » selon Pierre Nicole. Astérion 5.
    La notion de « commerce d’amour-propre » telle qu’elle a été élaborée par Pierre Nicole constitue-t-elle une sorte de préfiguration de l’utilitarisme moderne ? Il est commun de le penser. Mais c’est peut-être là faire trop peu de cas du soubassement théologique augustinien de la doctrine de Nicole. Pour analyser le problème, il convient de confronter la pensée de Nicole à celles de Pascal, de Hobbes et de saint Augustin lui-même.
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  32.  7
    Andrew Youpa (2006). Leibniz and China: A Commerce of Light (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 44 (1):125-126.
    Andrew Youpa - Leibniz and China: A Commerce of Light - Journal of the History of Philosophy 44:1 Journal of the History of Philosophy 44.1 125-126 Franklin Perkins. Leibniz and China: A Commerce of Light. Cambridge-New York: Cambridge University Press, 2004. Pp. xvi + 224. Cloth, $65.00. In his Leibniz and China, Franklin Perkins undertakes two main tasks. The first is historical: to illuminate Leibniz's nearly lifelong interest in China within the context of early modern Europe as well (...)
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  33.  3
    Steven Yates (2006). Capitalism and Commerce. [REVIEW] Journal of Ayn Rand Studies 7 (2):459 - 471.
    Edward W. Younkins's book, Capitalism and Commerce: Conceptual Inundations of Free Enterprise, develops a systematic case for a free enterprise model that restricts state activity to a few clearly enumerated functions. He sets out the ideas of individual rights and property ownership, moving from here to freedom of transaction under the rule of law. He considers entrepreneurship and progress. Finally he discusses the various opponents of free enterprise and responds, concluding with a meditation on the prospects of bringing about (...)
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  34.  7
    James G. Hodge, Erin C. Fuse Brown, Daniel G. Orenstein & Sarah O'Keefe (2011). Congress, Courts, and Commerce: Upholding the Individual Mandate to Protect the Public's Health. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 39 (3):394-400.
    Among multiple legal challenges to the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) is the premise that PPACA's “individual mandate” (requiring all individuals to obtain health insurance by 2014 or face civil penalties) is inviolate of Congress' interstate commerce powers because Congress lacks the power to regulate commercial “inactivity.” Several courts initially considering this argument have rejected it, but federal district courts in Virginia and Florida have concurred, leading to numerous appeals and prospective review of the United States Supreme (...)
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  35.  1
    Elisabetta Bucolo (2003). Le Commerce Équitable. Hermes 36:109.
    Les pratiques du commerce équitable, décrites dans cet article, montrent comment a pu se développer, tout au long de ses quarante années d'existence, un mouvement capable de relier autour des mêmes préoccupations, des citoyens du nord et du sud du monde. De ce fait, on peut affirmer que, en dépit des clivages et des divergences, le commerce équitable participe à la définition d'un espace public d'envergure internationale autour des questions de la consommation et des modes d'organisation du (...) international. La première partie a pour but de clarifier la démarche technique et les valeurs qui animent le mouvement. La deuxième partie pose la question de savoir dans quelle mesure les impacts générés à la fois sur le marché conventionnel et sur le développement du sud du monde ont du sens pour l'avenir.The practices of fair trade described in this article show how this movement has been able to create links between citizens with shared concerns in the southern and northern hemispheres in the 40 years it has existed. In this way, we are able to affirm that despite certain differences and divisions, fair trade has contributed towards the definition of international public discussion on question such as consumption and the organization of international trade. The first part of this article aims to clarify the technical process and the values underpinning this civic movement through a description of its practices. The second part aims to assess the extent to which the impact fair trade has had on conventional trade and on local development in the southern hemisphere indicates a direction for the future. (shrink)
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  36. Jeremy Bentham (1995). Colonies, Commerce, and Constitutional Law: The Collected Works of Jeremy Bentham. Oxford University Press Uk.
    Colonies, Commerce, and Constitutional Law is a major theoretical analysis of the harmful effects of colonies on commerce and constitiutional democracy, and is one of the most important studies of colonialism written in the nineteenth century. Of the four essays collected in this voloume, three have been edited directly from the original manuscript sources. The only essay to have appeared in print, `Observations on the Restrictive and Prohibitory Commercial System', is generally regarded as an early classic statement of (...)
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  37. Michael D. Chan (2006). Aristotle and Hamilton on Commerce and Statesmanship. University of Missouri.
    Although America’s founders may have been inspired by the political thought of ancient Greece and Rome, the United States is more often characterized by its devotion to the pursuit of commerce. Some have even said that a modern commercial republic such as the United States unavoidably lowers its moral horizon to little more than a concern with securing peace and prosperity so that commerce can flourish. Michael Chan reconsiders this view of America through close readings of Aristotle and (...)
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  38. J. E. Crowley (1992). Commerce and the Philadelphia Constitution: Neo-Mercantalism in Federalist and Anti-Federalist Political Economy. History of Political Thought 13 (1):73.
    This article shows how attention to a third political discourse -- mercantilist thought -- provides a direct understanding of the issues of commerce and market relations in the framing and ratification of the constitution drafted at the Philadelphia convention in 1787. Mercantilist political discourse was readily employable alongside the republican, liberal and other political languages already studied at greater length. In contrast to the vagueness of classical republican references to �commerce�, which made it a metaphor for entire social (...)
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  39. Neil Mcarthur (2004). Hume's Indissoluble Chain: Law, Commerce, and Sociability in David Hume's Political Theory. Dissertation, University of Southern California
    This dissertation offers an interpretation of David Hume's political and economic theory that challenges an accepted view this theory. According to this accepted view, Hume offers no positive criteria that maybe used to criticize existing institutions. Against this view, it is argued that Hume thinks that the best society will be one that promotes three distinct human ends---ends he calls industry, knowledge, and humanity. These are, respectively, the active pursuit of intellectual or sensual gratification, the cultivation of the arts and (...)
     
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  40.  1
    Jean-Luc Nancy (2009). On the Commerce of Thinking: Of Books and Bookstores. Fordham University Press.
    Jean-Luc Nancy'sOn the Commerce of Thinkingconcerns the particular communication of thoughts that takes place by means of the business of writing, producing, and selling books. His reflection is born out of his relation to the bookstore, in the first place his neighborhood one, but beyond that any such "perfumery, rotisserie, patisserie," as he calls them, dispensaries "of scents and flavors through which something like a fragrance or bouquet of the book is divined, presumed, sensed."On the Commerce of Thinking (...)
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  41.  3
    Mary-Antoinette Smith (ed.) (2010). Thomas Clarkson and Ottobah Cugoano: Essays on the Slavery and Commerce of the Human Species. Broadview Press.
    When abolitionists Thomas Clarkson and Ottobah Cugoano published their essays on slavery in the late eighteenth century, they became key participants in one of the most important human rights campaigns in history. British abolitionism sought to expose the realities of transatlantic slavery in addition to asking politicians to help dehumanized Africans in the New World, and this edition brings together two major essays of the 1780s that were influential in the spread of the early abolitionist movement: Clarkson's An Essay on (...)
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  42. Mary-Antoinette Smith (ed.) (2010). Thomas Clarkson and Ottobah Cugoano: Essays on the Slavery and Commerce of the Human Species. Broadview Press.
    When abolitionists Thomas Clarkson and Ottobah Cugoano published their essays on slavery in the late eighteenth century, they became key participants in one of the most important human rights campaigns in history. British abolitionism sought to expose the realities of transatlantic slavery in addition to asking politicians to help dehumanized Africans in the New World, and this edition brings together two major essays of the 1780s that were influential in the spread of the early abolitionist movement: Clarkson’s _An Essay on (...)
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  43. Mary-Antoinette Smith (ed.) (2010). Thomas Clarkson and Ottobah Cugoano: Essays on the Slavery and Commerce of the Human Species. Broadview Press.
    When abolitionists Thomas Clarkson and Ottobah Cugoano published their essays on slavery in the late eighteenth century, they became key participants in one of the most important human rights campaigns in history. British abolitionism sought to expose the realities of transatlantic slavery in addition to asking politicians to help dehumanized Africans in the New World, and this edition brings together two major essays of the 1780s that were influential in the spread of the early abolitionist movement: Clarkson’s _An Essay on (...)
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  44. Deirdre N. McCloskey (2006). The Bourgeois Virtues: Ethics for an Age of Commerce. University of Chicago Press.
    For a century and a half, the artists and intellectuals of Europe have scorned the bourgeoisie. And for a millennium and a half, the philosophers and theologians of Europe have scorned the marketplace. The bourgeois life, capitalism, Mencken’s “booboisie” and David Brooks’s “bobos”—all have been, and still are, framed as being responsible for everything from financial to moral poverty, world wars, and spiritual desuetude. Countering these centuries of assumptions and unexamined thinking is Deirdre McCloskey’s _The Bourgeois Virtues_, a magnum opus (...)
     
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  45.  95
    Dewey D. Wallace (forthcoming). Book Review: Heavenly Merchandize: How Religion Shaped Commerce in Puritan America. [REVIEW] Interpretation 65 (2):190-192.
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  46. Samuel J. Kerstein (2009). Kantian Condemnation of Commerce in Organs. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 19 (2):pp. 147-169.
  47.  25
    Vivienne Brown (1994). Adam Smith's Discourse: Canonicity, Commerce, and Conscience. Routledge.
    Adam Smith's name has become synonymous with free market economics. Recent scholarship has given us a richer, more nuanced figure, steeped in the intricacies of enlightenment social and political philosophy. Adam Smith's Discourse develops this literature and gives it a radical new dimension. The first book on Adam Smith to deal with recent debates in literary theory, this interdisciplinary work examines Smith's major texts and places them within the context of enlightenment thought. It considers Smith's major writings--the Lectures on Jurisprudence (...)
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  48.  2
    Mauricio S. Featherman & Nick Hajli (forthcoming). Self-Service Technologies and E-Services Risks in Social Commerce Era. Journal of Business Ethics.
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  49.  11
    A. J. Walsh, Sport, Commerce and the Market.
    Over the past 50 years, we have witnessed a revolution in the organisation and social understanding of elite sport. Elite sport has been commercialised. Top-level athletes have become professionals who often receive remarkable levels of income and sporting events, such as the World Cup, are multi-billion dollar exercises that attract enormous levels of sponsorship. Many sports, such as cricket, have been substantially revamped in order to make them more appealing to mass audiences and, accordingly, more beneficial to sponsors and many (...)
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  50.  25
    Evan Selinger & Timothy Engström (2008). A Moratorium on Cyborgs: Computation, Cognition, and Commerce. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 7 (3):327-341.
    By examining the contingent alliance that has emerged between the computational theory of mind and cyborg theory, we discern some questionable ways in which the literalization of technological metaphors and the over-extension of the “computational” have functioned, not only to influence conceptions of cognition, but also by becoming normative perspectives on how minds and bodies should be transformed, such that they can capitalize on technology’s capacity to enhance cognition and thus amend our sense of what it is to be “human”. (...)
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