Search results for 'Fourth dimension' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  31
    Gregory J. Feist (2013). The Nature and Nurture of Expertise: A Fourth Dimension. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 12 (2):275-288.
    One formative idea behind the workshop on expertise in Berkeley in August of 2010 was to develop a viable “trading zone” of ideas, which is defined as a location “in which communities with a deep problem of communication manage to communicate” (Collins et al. 2010, p. 8). In the current case, the goal is to have a trading zone between philosophers, sociologists, and psychologists who communicate their ideas on expertise such that productive interdisciplinary collaboration results. In this paper, I review (...)
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  2. J. A. Richardson (1969). Cubism and the Fourth Dimension: A Myth in Modern Criticism. Diogenes 17 (65):99-109.
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  3.  92
    C. T. K. Chari (1949). On Representations of Time as "the Fourth Dimension" and Their Metaphysical Inadequacy. Mind 58 (230):218-221.
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  4.  58
    James van Cleve (1987). Right, Left, and the Fourth Dimension. Philosophical Review 96 (1):33-68.
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  5.  29
    David W. Shoemaker (2005). Embryos, Souls, and the Fourth Dimension. Social Theory and Practice 31 (1):51-75.
    This paper defends the permissibility of stem cell research against a theological objector who objects to it by appealing to "souls.".
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  6.  64
    Laurence J. Lafleur (1940). Time as a Fourth Dimension. Journal of Philosophy 37 (7):169-178.
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  7. Lenore Langsdorf (2002). Reconstructing the Fourth Dimension: A Deweyan Critique of Habermas's Conception of Communicative Action. In Mitchell Aboulafia, Myra Orbach Bookman & Cathy Kemp (eds.), Habermas and Pragmatism. Routledge 141--164.
     
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  8.  22
    Stephen H. Kellert (1994). Space Perception and the Fourth Dimension. Man and World 27 (2):161-180.
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  9.  11
    H. M. Kingery (1910). Magic in the Fourth Dimension. The Monist 20 (2):309-320.
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  10.  35
    Tom H. Gibbons (1981). Cubism and 'the Fourth Dimension' in the Context of the Late Nineteenth-Century and Early Twentieth-Century Revival of Occult Idealism. Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 44:130-147.
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  11.  6
    Jonathan Joseph (2001). Hegemony in the Fourth Dimension. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 31 (3):261–277.
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  12.  8
    Hermann Schubert (1893). The Fourth Dimension. The Monist 3 (3):402-449.
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  13.  7
    Marianna Forleo (2007). The Fourth Dimension Dimensional Jumps and New Perspectives in a Geometric Utopia. Epistemologia 30 (2):265-280.
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  14.  15
    James Van Cleve (1987). Right, Left, and the Fourth Dimension. Philosophical Review 96 (1):33 - 68.
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  15.  10
    Robin Small (1994). Nietzsche, Zöllner, and the Fourth Dimension. Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 76 (3):278-301.
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  16.  2
    Malgorzata Zurakowska (2003). The Fourth Dimension of Art. Analecta Husserliana 78:219-226.
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  17. William J. Friedman (1990). About Time: Inventing the Fourth Dimension. Cambridge: MIT Press.
  18.  7
    James H. Hyslop (1896). The Fourth Dimension of Space. Philosophical Review 5 (4):352-370.
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  19.  2
    Martin Gardner (1991). The Fourth Dimension. In James Van~Cleve & Robert E. Frederick (eds.), The Philosophy of Right and Left. Kluwer 61--74.
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  20.  1
    Arthur J. Nonneman (1979). Time: A Fourth Dimension for the Hippocampal Cognitive Map. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (4):511.
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  21.  1
    Nancy Bentley (2009). The Fourth Dimension: Kinlessness and African American Narrative. Critical Inquiry 35 (2):270-292.
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  22. Alfred M. Bork (1964). The Fourth Dimension in Nineteenth-Century Physics. Isis 55 (3):326-338.
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  23. J. F. Dashiell (1940). A Neglected Fourth Dimension to Psychological Research. Psychological Review 47 (4):289-305.
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  24. J. DeBrizzi (1978). Piccone's Fourth Dimension. Télos 1978 (37):144-147.
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  25. Richard Ericksen (1926). Consciousness, Life and the Fourth Dimension: A Study in Natural Philosophy. Philosophical Review 35 (1):74-78.
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  26. C. H. Hinton (1905). The Fourth Dimension. The Monist 15:310.
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  27. Joost Abraham Maurits Meerloo (1970). Along the Fourth Dimension. New York,John Day Co..
     
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  28. Hermann Schubert (1892). Fourth Dimension, The. The Monist 3:402.
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  29. Skuli Sigurdsson (1989). The Fourth Dimension and Non-Euclidean Geometry in Modern ArtLinda Dalrymple Henderson. Isis 80 (4):737-738.
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  30. Gerd-Helge Vogel (2005). Mobility: The Fourth Dimension in the Fine Arts and Architecture. Contemporary Aesthetics 1.
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  31. Robert Wallis (1968). Time, Fourth Dimension of the Mind. New York, Harcourt, Brace and World.
     
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  32. P. D. Uspenskiĭ (1934). A New Model of the Universe. New York, A.A. Knopf.
    Introduction.--Esotericism and modern thought.--The fourth dimension.--Superman.--Christianity and the New Testament.--The symbolism of the Tarot.--What is yoga?--On the study of dreams and on hypnotism.--Experimental mysticism.--In search of the miraculous.--A new model of the universe.--Eternal recurrence and the laws of Manu.--Sex and evolution.
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  33.  31
    Hud Hudson (2005). The Metaphysics of Hyperspace. Oxford University Press.
    Hud Hudson offers a fascinating examination of philosophical reasons to believe in hyperspace. He explores non-theistic reasons in the first chapter and theistic ones towards the end; in the intervening sections he inquires into a variety of puzzles in the metaphysics of material objects that are either generated by the hypothesis of hyperspace or else informed by it, with discussions of receptacles, boundaries, contact, occupation, and superluminal motion. Anyone engaged with contemporary metaphysics, and many philosophers of religion, will find much (...)
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  34.  59
    Mark Heller (1990). The Ontology of Physical Objects: Four-Dimensional Hunks of Matter. Cambridge University Press.
    This provocative new book attempts to resolve traditional problems of identity over time. It seeks to answer such questions as "How is it that an object can survive change?" and "How much change can an object undergo without being destroyed?" To answer these questions Professor Heller presents a completely new theory about the nature of physical objects and about the relationship between our language and the physical world. According to his theory, the only actually existing physical entities are what the (...)
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  35. Nathan Field (1996). Breakdown and Breakthrough: Psychotherapy in a New Dimension. Routledge.
    Breakdown and Breakthrough examines the essential role of regression in the patient's recovery from mental illness. In light of this Nathan Field reassesses the role of the therapist tracing psychotherapy back to its earliest spiritual roots and comparing modern analytic methods with ancient practices of healing and exorcism. The author uses vivid examples from his psychotherapeutic practice to show how, with the apparent breakdown of the therapeutic method itself, patients can break through to a new level of functioning. The book (...)
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  36. Maurice Maeterlinck (1928). La Vie de L'Espace. E. Fasquelle.
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  37. Garabed Hagop Paelian (1936). Relativity and Reality. New York, Macoy Pub. Co..
     
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  38. Charles Ray Salmon (1972). The Book of Purpose. Santa Maria, Calif.,Cronus College Press.
     
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  39. P. D. Uspenskiĭ (1931). A New Model of the Universe: Principles of the Psychological Method in its Application to Problems of Science, Religion, and Art. Kegan Paul, Trench, Trubner & Co..
  40. P. D. Uspenskiĭ (1950). Tertium Organum. New York,Vintage Books.
     
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  41. P. D. Uspenskii (1982). Tertium Organum: The Third Canon of Thought: A Key to the Enigmas of the World. Vintage Books.
    The revised translation of the world famous Russian philosopher's work about attempting to understand man and his place in creation.
     
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  42. P. D. Uspenskiĭ (1981). Tertium Organum: The Third Canon of Thought, a Key to the Enigmas of the World. Distributed by Random House.
     
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  43.  3
    Anthony Vincent Fernandez (2014). Reconsidering the Affective Dimension of Depression and Mania: Towards a Phenomenological Dissolution of the Paradox of Mixed States. Journal of Psychopathology 20 (4):414-422.
    In this paper, I examine recent phenomenological research on both depressive and manic episodes, with the intention of showing how phenomenologically oriented studies can help us overcome the apparently paradoxical nature of mixed states. First, I argue that some of the symptoms included in the diagnostic criteria for depressive and manic episodes in the DSM-5 are not actually essential features of these episodes. Second, I reconsider the category of major depressive disorder (MDD) from the perspective of phenomenological psychopathology, arguing that (...)
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  44.  12
    Meinolf Dierkes & Klaus Zimmerman (1994). The Institutional Dimension of Business Ethics: An Agenda for Reflection Research and Action. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 13 (7):533 - 541.
    The current discussion of business ethics is nothing new. In fact it has been a topic of common interest to both researchers and top managers since the mid fifties; the focus adjusting to issues and problems of the times. The authors of the article list four themes they believe to be of relevance for future discussion. First, ethics as an instrument of business behavior is entering a new dimension due to negative side effects of economic activities, which are even (...)
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  45.  2
    Charles Devellennes (2013). Fourth Musketeer of Social Contract Theory. History of Political Thought 34 (3):459-478.
    Holbach's famous materialistic and atheistic philosophy is less known for its political dimension. Yet the author proposed an original theory of the social contract in his works of the 1770s. This article details the main features of his political thought and of his social contract, notably his proposal of an 'Ethocracy' grounded in utility and justice. This Ethocracy paves the way for a pluralist republicanism that has original features in the history of ideas. Holbach was a reader of Hobbes (...)
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  46. Stan Klein (2016). Autonoetic Consciousness: Re-Considering the Role of Episodic Memory in Future-Oriented Self-Projection. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology 69 (2):381-401.
    Following the seminal work of Ingvar (1985. “Memory for the future”: An essay on the temporal organization of conscious awareness. Human Neurobiology, 4, 127–136), Suddendorf (1994. The discovery of the fourth dimension: Mental time travel and human evolution. Master’s thesis. University of Waikato, Hamilton, New Zealand), and Tulving (1985. Memory and consciousness. Canadian Psychology/Psychologie Canadienne, 26, 1–12), exploration of the ability to anticipate and prepare for future contingencies that cannot be known with certainty has grown into a thriving (...)
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  47. Craig Reeves (2013). Freedom, Dialectic and Philosophical Anthropology. Journal of Critical Realism 12 (1):13-44.
    In this article I present an original interpretation of Roy Bhaskar’s project in Dialectic: The Pulse of Freedom. His major move is to separate an ontological dialectic from a critical dialectic, which in Hegel are laminated together. The ontological dialectic, which in Hegel is the self-unfolding of spirit, becomes a realist and relational philosophical anthropology. The critical dialectic, which in Hegel is confined to retracing the steps of spirit, now becomes an active force, dialectical critique, which interposes into the ontological (...)
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  48. Mark Heller (1984). Temporal Parts of Four Dimensional Objects. Philosophical Studies 46 (3):323 - 334.
    I offer a clear conception of a temporal part that does not make the existence of temporal parts implausible. This can be done if (and only if) we think of physical objects as four dimensional, The fourth dimension being time. Unless we are willing to deny the existence of most spatial parts, Or willing to accept the possibility of coincident entities, Or accept something even more implausible, We should accept the existence of temporal parts.
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  49.  69
    Baptiste Le Bihan (2015). The Unrealities of Time. Dialogue 54 (1):25-44.
    Is time flowing? A-theorists say yes, B-theorists say no. But both take time to be real. It means that B-theorists accept that time might be real, even if lacking a property usually ascribed to it. In this paper, I want to ask what are the different properties usually ascribed to time in order to draw the list of different possible kinds of realism and anti-realism about time. As we will see, there are three main kinds of anti-realism. I will claim (...)
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  50.  5
    Ray Scott Percival (2000). Bergson: Challenger to Einstein's Theory of Time. [REVIEW] Times Higher Education:1 - 2.
    Henri Bergson is perhaps most remembered for his bold challenge to Einstein's theory of the relativity of simultaneity. Bergson maintained that Einstein's theory did not cope with our intuition of time, which is an intuition of duration. Einstein retorted that there may be psychological time, but there is no special philosopher's time. For Einstein, time forms the fourth dimension of a so-called Parmenidean "block universe". I argue that we must be on our guard not to read into the (...)
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