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  1. Francesco Orilia (2006). Stati di cose, esemplificazione e regresso di Bradley. Rivista di Filosofia 97 (3):349-386.
    This paper examines the challenge that the argument known as "Bradley's regress" poses to the friends of states of affairs (facts), in its requesting an explanation of the existence of a fact as a unitary whole in addition to its constituents. All the main theoretical options, short of denying that there are facts, are considered. It is argued that only two of them are viable, namely a "Brute fact approach", according to which the existence of a fact cannot be explained (...)
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  2.  96
    Francesco Orilia (2009). Bradley's Regress and Ungrounded Dependence Chains: A Reply to Cameron. Dialectica 63 (3):333-341.
    A version of Bradley's regress can be endorsed in an effort to address the problem of the unity of states of affairs or facts, thereby arriving at a doctrine that I have called fact infinitism . A consequence of it is the denial of the thesis, WF, that all chains of ontological dependence are well-founded or grounded. Cameron has recently rejected fact infinitism by arguing that WF, albeit not necessarily true, is however contingently true. Here fact infinitism is supported by (...)
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  3.  5
    Francesco Orilia (2014). Positions, Ordering Relations and O‐Roles. Dialectica 68 (2):283-303.
    This paper first discusses how Russell and Hochberg have addressed some phenomena of relatedness, notably relational order, in a similarly ‘positionalist’ way, yet by appealing to different sorts of formal relations: “positions” in Russell's case and “ordering relations” in Hochberg's. After pointing out some shortcomings of both approaches, the paper then proposes an alternative view based on ‘o-roles’, which are, roughly speaking, ontological counterparts of the thematic roles postulated in linguistics. It is argued that o-roles are sort of middle-of-the-road entities (...)
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  4. Francesco Orilia (forthcoming). Identity Across Frames. Topoi.
     
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  5.  52
    Francesco Orilia (2011). Relational Order and Onto-Thematic Roles. Metaphysica 12 (1):1-18.
    States of affairs involving a non-symmetric relation such as loving are said to have a relational order, something that distinguishes, for instance, Romeo’s loving Juliet from Juliet’s loving Romeo. Relational order can be properly understood by appealing to o-roles, i.e., ontological counterparts of what linguists call thematic roles, e.g., agent, patient, instrument, and the like. This move allows us to meet the appropriate desiderata for a theory of relational order. In contrast, the main theories that try to do without o-roles, (...)
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  6.  85
    Francesco Orilia (2012). Dynamic Events and Presentism. Philosophical Studies 160 (3):407-414.
    Dynamic events such as a rolling ball moving from one place to another involve change and time intervals and thus presumably successions of static events occurring one after the other, e.g., the ball’s being at a certain place and then at another place during the interval in question. When dynamic events are experienced they should count as present and thus as existent from a presentist point of view. But this seems to imply the existence of the static events involved in (...)
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  7.  19
    Francesco Orilia (2016). Moderate Presentism. Philosophical Studies 173 (3):589-607.
    Typical presentism asserts that whatever exists is present. Moderate presentism more modestly claims that all events are present and thus acknowledges past and future times understood in a substantivalist sense, and past objects understood, following Williamson, as “ex-concrete.” It is argued that moderate presentism retains the most valuable features of typical presentism, while having considerable advantages in dealing with its most prominent difficulties.
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  8.  20
    Francesco Orilia (2000). Property Theory and the Revision Theory of Definitions. Journal of Symbolic Logic 65 (1):212-246.
    Russell’s type theory has been the standard property theory for years, relying on rigid type distinctions at the grammatical level to circumvent the paradoxes of predication. In recent years it has been convincingly argued by Bealer, Cochiarella, Turner and others that many linguistic and ontological data are best accounted for by using a type-free property theory. In the spirit of exploring alternatives and “to have as many opportunities as possible for theory comparison”, this paper presents another type-free property theory, to (...)
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  9.  45
    Francesco Orilia (2000). Meaning and Circular Definitions. Journal of Philosophical Logic 29 (2):155-169.
    Gupta's and Belnap's Revision Theory of Truth defends the legitimacy of circular definitions. Circularity, however, forces us to reconsider our conception of meaning. A readjustment of some standard theses about meaning is here proposed, by relying on a novel version of the sense-reference distinction.
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  10.  85
    Francesco Orilia & Achille C. Varzi (1998). A Note on Analysis and Circular Definitions. Grazer Philosophische Studien 54:107-113.
    Analyses, in the simplest form assertions that aim to capture an intimate link between two concepts, are viewed since Russell's theory of definite descriptions as analyzing descriptions. Analysis therefore has to obey the laws governing definitions including some form of a Substitutivity Principle (SP). Once (SP) is accepted the road to the paradox of analysis is open. Popular reactions to the paradox involve the fundamental assumption (SV) that sentences differing only in containing an analysandum resp. an analysans express the same (...)
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  11.  2
    Francesco Orilia (2012). Filosofia Del Tempo: Il Dibattito Contemporaneo. Carocci.
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  12.  17
    Francesco Orilia (2000). Argument Deletion, Thematic Roles, and Leibniz's Logico-Grammatical Analysis of Relations. History and Philosophy of Logic 21 (2):147-162.
    I present a formal framework historically faithful to Leibniz's analysis of relational sentences, which: (i) engrafts thematic roles and the non-truth-functional connective insofar as (quatenus) into the monadic fragment of first-order logic; (ii) suggests a plausible ontological picture of thematic roles and relational facts; (iii) supports argument deletion and related inferential patterns that are not taken into account by standard first-order logic.
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  13.  11
    Francesco Orilia (2006). States of Affairs: Bradley Vs. Meinong. In Venanzio Raspa (ed.), Meinongian Issues in Contemporary Italian Philosophy. Ontos 213--238.
    In line with much current literature, Bradley’s regress is here discussed as an argument that casts doubt on the existence of states of affairs or facts, understood as complex entities working as truthmakers for true sentences or propositions. One should distinguish two versions of Bradley’s regress, which stem from two different tentative explanations of the unity of states of affairs. The first version actually shows that the corresponding explanation is incoherent; the second one merely points to some prima facie implausible (...)
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  14.  42
    Francesco Orilia & L. Nathan Oaklander (2013). Do We Really Need a New B-Theory of Time? Topoi 34 (1):1-14.
    It is customary in current philosophy of time to distinguish between an A- (or tensed) and a B- (or tenseless) theory of time. It is also customary to distinguish between an old B-theory of time, and a new B-theory of time. We may say that the former holds both semantic atensionalism and ontological atensionalism, whereas the latter gives up semantic atensionalism and retains ontological atensionalism. It is typically assumed that the B-theorists have been induced by advances in the philosophy of (...)
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  15.  71
    Francesco Orilia & Achille C. Varzi (1996). Truth and Circular Definitions. [REVIEW] Minds and Machines 6 (1):124–129.
    This original and enticing book provides a fresh, unifying perspective on many old and new logico-philosophical conundrums. Its basic thesis is that many concepts central in ordinary and philosophical discourse are inherently circular and thus cannot be fully understood as long as one remains within the confines of a standard theory of definitions. As an alternative, the authors develop a revision theory of definitions, which allows definitions to be circular without this giving rise to contradiction (but, at worst, to “vacuous” (...)
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  16.  11
    Francesco Orilia (1994). The Eightfold Ambiguity of Oratia Obliqua Sentences. Grazer Philosophische Studien 47:197-205.
    Sentences such as "Holmes believes that the leader of the London gang is about to be incriminated" are commonly understood to have two readings: de re and de diclo. On the basis of the way which the de relde dicto distinction is customarily conveyed, it is shown that such sentences have not just two but eight readings. It is suggested that intensional entities - such as senses, guises or denoting concepts - are the most natural way to account for this (...)
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  17.  12
    Francesco Orilia (1996). A Contingent Russell's Paradox. Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 37 (1):105-111.
    It is shown that two formally consistent type-free second-order systems, due to Cocchiarella, and based on the notion of homogeneous stratification, are subject to a contingent version of Russell's paradox.
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  18.  12
    Francesco Orilia (2000). The Property-Theoretical, Performative-Nominalistic Theory of Proper Names. Dialectica 54 (3):155–176.
    This paper embeds a theory of proper names in a general approach to singular reference based on type‐free property theory. It is proposed that a proper name “N” is a sortal common noun whose meaning is essentially tied to the linguistic type “N”. Moreover, “N” can be singularly referring insofar as it is elliptical for a definite description of the form the “N” Following Montague, the meaning of a definite description is taken to be a property of properties. The proposed (...)
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  19.  13
    Francesco Orilia (1994). Belief Representation in a Deductivist Type-Free Doxastic Logic. Minds and Machines 4 (2):163-203.
    Konolige''s technical notion of belief based on deduction structures is briefly reviewed and its usefulness for the design of artificial agents with limited representational and deductive capacities is pointed out. The design of artificial agents with more sophisticated representational and deductive capacities is then taken into account. Extended representational capacities require in the first place a solution to the intensional context problems. As an alternative to Konolige''s modal first-order language, an approach based on type-free property theory is proposed. It considers (...)
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  20.  13
    Francesco Orilia (1991). Type-Free Property Theory, Bradley's Regress and Meinong and Russell Reconceiled. Grazer Philosophische Studien 39:103-125.
    The type-free property-theoretic system EC, based on the mediation view of predication, is presented. According to the mediation view, the copula or exemplification is a necessary component of every proposition. It is explained how the system EC relates to Bradley's Regress regarding predication. Finally, the system EC is applied to the Meinong-Russell debate on non-existent objects and it is shown how EC allows us to preserve some important intuitions of both Meinong and Russell.
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  21.  21
    Francesco Orilia (1991). Type-Free Property Theory, Exemplification and Russell's Paradox. Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 32 (3):432-447.
    This paper presents a type-free property-theoretic system in the spirit of a framework proposed by Menzel and then supplements it with a theory of truth and exemplification. The notions of a truth-relevantly complex (simple) sentence and of a truth-relevant subsentence are introduced and then used in order to motivate the proposed theory. Finally, it is shown how the theory avoids Russell's paradox and similar problems. Some potential applications to the foundations of mathematics and to natural language semantics are sketched in (...)
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  22.  4
    Francesco Orilia (2012). Tradition and Innovation in Ontology: The Case of Propositions and States of Affairs. Philosophical News 5.
    I shall explain the notions of propositions and states of affairs as they are understood in the current ontological debate and I shall briefly relate them to similar notions in Aristotle and some Medieval authors. In contrast with the point of view of some philosophers who identify propositions and states of affairs, I shall argue that they need to be sharply distinguished. I shall then move on to a problem for propositions and, above all, states of affairs, known as Bradley’s (...)
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  23. Francesco Orilia (2003). Logical Rules, Principles of Reasoning and Russell's Paradox. In Timothy Childers & Ondrej Majer (eds.), Logica Yearbook 2002. Filosofia 179--192.
     
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  24.  3
    William J. Rapaport & Francesco Orilia (eds.) (1998). Thought, Language, and Ontology, Essays in Memory of Hector-Neri Castaneda. Kluwer.
    The late Hector-Neri Castañeda, the Mahlon Powell Professor of Philosophy at Indiana University, and founding editor of Noûs, has deeply influenced current analytic philosophy with diverse contributions, including guise theory, the theory of indicators and quasi-indicators, and the proposition/practition theory. This volume collects 15 papers--for the most part previously unpublished--in ontology, philosophy of language, cognitive science, and related areas by ex-students of Professor Castañeda, most of whom are now well-known researchers or even distinguished scholars. The authors share the conviction that (...)
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  25.  11
    Francesco Orilia (2012). A theory of fictional entities based on denoting concepts. Revue Internationale de Philosophie 4:577-592.
    There are many data suggesting that we should acknowledge fictional entities in our ontological inventory, in spite of the paraphrasing strategies that Russell’s theory of descriptions can offer. Thus the realist attitude toward fictional entities of Meinongian and artifactualist accounts may seem well-motivated. Yet, these approaches infringe the Russellian “robust sense of reality.” A different realist account is proposed here, one that is compatible with the Russellian “robust sense of reality” in that it identifies fictional entities with denoting concepts, understood (...)
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  26.  5
    Gregory J. E. Rawlins & Francesco Orilia (2000). BRINGSJORD) 457–459 In Addition: Rapaport, WJ (2000),'Discussion Review: Steven Pinker, How the Mind Works', Minds and Machines 10, Pp. 381–389. In Note 1 on P. 387 a Website Page has Been Changed. [REVIEW] Minds and Machines 10:583-584.
  27.  3
    Francesco Orilia (1986). Van Cleve, The Bundle Theory and Guise Theory. Auslegung 12 (2):174-187.
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  28.  26
    Francesco Orilia (2003). A Description Theory of Singular Reference. Dialectica 57 (1):7–40.
    According to the received view, descriptivism is a dead end in an attempt to account for singular reference by proper names, indexicals and possibly even incomplete descriptions, for they require referentialism. In contrast to this, I argue for an application of the former to all kinds of singular terms, indexicals in particular, by relying on a view of incomplete descriptions as elliptical in a pragmatic sense. I thus provide a general analysis of singular reference. The proposed approach is in line (...)
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  29.  2
    Francesco Orilia (2014). This Moment and the Next Moment. In Giovanni Macchia, Francesco Orilia & Vincenzo Fano (eds.), Space and Time: A Priori and a Posteriori Studies. De Gruyter 171-194.
    This paper outlines a version of instantaneous presentism, according to which the present is a point-like instant, and defends it from two prominent objections. The first one has to do with the difficulty of accounting, from the point of view of instantaneous presentism, for the existence of events that take time, dynamic events, which cannot be confined to a single instant. The second objection is of a Zenonian nature and arises once time is viewed as a continuum that can be (...)
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  30.  15
    Francesco Orilia (2001). Metaphor and Truth-Makers. Journal of Philosophical Research 26:103-129.
    This paper builds on Lakoff’s and Johnson’s theory of metaphorical concepts to propose that our conception of truth as correspondence with reality is metaphorically based on our conception of perceptual fields. In particular, it is argued that parts of reality, as metaphorically understood in terms of parts of perceptual fields, can play the role of objective truth-makers for sentences with empirical content; for instance, they meet the constraints on correspondence put forward by Barry Smith. Finally, Richard Boyd’s account of the (...)
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  31.  24
    Francesco Orilia (2006). Quantum-Mechanical Statistics and the Inclusivist Approach to the Nature of Particulars. Synthese 148 (1):57 - 77.
    There have been attempts to derive anti-haeccetistic conclusions from the fact that quantum mechanics (QM) appeals to non-standard statistics. Since in fact QM acknowledges two kinds of such statistics, Bose-Einstein and Fermi-Dirac, I argue that we could in the same vein derive the sharper anti-haeccetistic conclusion that bosons are bundles of tropes and fermions are bundles of universals. Moreover, since standard statistics is still appropriate at the macrolevel, we could also venture to say that no anti-haecceitistic conclusion is warranted for (...)
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  32.  23
    Francesco Orilia (1987). Definite Descriptions and Existence Attribution. Topoi 6 (2):133-138.
    The hierarchical analysis of existence attribution is Fregean in its endorsement of senses, understood as guises. Furthermore, the hierarchical analysis makes an essential use of the Russellian analysis (9′) as a means to understand what it is for a sense to present a given entity (cf. biconditional (11) above). The hierarchical analysis, on the other hand, is more general than the Russellian one and hence - in accordance with natural language usage - allows for a wider range of applications.
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  33.  6
    Francesco Orilia (2007). Self-Reference and Self-Knowledge. Soochow Journal of Philosophical Studies 16:257 - 281.
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  34.  6
    Francesco Orilia (2012). Analytic Philosophy of Fiction: Editor's Introduction. Revue Internationale de Philosophie 4:481-482.
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  35. Francesco Orilia (1986). Natural Language Semantics and Guise Theory. Dissertation, Indiana University
    I assume that the task of natural language semantics is to provide an unambiguous logical language into which natural language can be translated in such a way that the translating expressions display a structure which is isomorphic to the meaning of the translated expressions. Since language is a means of thinking and communicating mental contents, the meanings of singular terms cannot be the individuals of the substratist tradition, because such individuals are not cognizable entities. Thus I propose that the logical (...)
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  36.  15
    Francesco Orilia (2000). Diego Marconi, Lexical Competence, Language, Speech and Communication Series. Minds and Machines 10 (3):452-455.
  37. Francesco Orilia (1991). Guise Theory. In Hans Burkhardt & Barry Smith (eds.), Handbook of Metaphysics and Ontology. Philosophia Verlag 338--341.
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  38. Francesco Orilia (2002). Termini singolare, figure e co-referenzialità. Annali Della Facoltà di Lettere E Filosofia 35:487-506.
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  39. Francesco Orilia (2005). Considerazioni ontologiche e semantico-pragmatiche sulle prodizioni. Annali Della Facoltà di Lettere E Filosofia 38:413-420.
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  40.  1
    Francesco Orilia (2003). Identità nel tempo e identità intertestuale. Rivista di Filosofia 94 (3):353-368.
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  41. Carola Barbero E. Venanzio Raspa, Andrea Tabarroni, Marina Manotta, Rosaria Egidi, Albeno Voltolini, Arianna Betti, Francesco Orilia, Mario Alai, Roberto Poli & Francesco Armezzani (2005). Il pregiudizio a favore del reale. Rivista di Estetica 45 (30):3-243.
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  42.  1
    Vincenzo Fano, Francesco Orilia & Giovanni Macchia (eds.) (2014). Space and Time: A Priori and a Posteriori Studies. De Gruyter.
    This collection focuses on the ontology of space and time. It is centred on the idea that the issues typically encountered in this area must be tackled from a multifarious perspective, paying attention to both a priori and a posteriori considerations. Several experts in this area contribute to this volume: G. Landini discusses how Russell’s conception of time features in his general philosophical perspective;D. Dieks proposes a middle course between substantivalist and relationist accounts of space-time;P. Graziani argues that it is (...)
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  43. Simone Gozzano & Francesco Orilia (eds.) (2008). Universals, Tropes and the Philosophy of Mind. Ontos Verlag.
    Table of Contents; Introduction by Francesco Orilia and Simone Gozzano; Modes and Mind by John Heil; Does Ontology Matter? by Anna-Sofia Maurin; Basic Ontology, Multiple Realizability and Mental Causation by Francesco Orilia; The “Supervenience Argument”:Kim’s Challenge to Nonreductive Physicalism by Ausonio Marras and Juhani Yli-Vakkuri; Tropes’ Simplicity and Mental Causation by Simone Gozzano; Zombies from Below by David Robb; Tropes and Perception by E. Jonathan Lowe; About the authors.
     
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  44. Giovanni Macchia, Francesco Orilia & Vincenzo Fano (2014). Editors’ Introduction. In Giovanni Macchia, Francesco Orilia & Vincenzo Fano (eds.), Space and Time: A Priori and a Posteriori Studies. De Gruyter 1-6.
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  45. Francesco Orilia (1994). A Note on Gödel's Ontological Argument. European Review of Philosophy 1:125-131.
     
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  46. Francesco Orilia (2016). Armstrong’s Supervenience and Ontological Dependence. In Francesco Federico Calemi (ed.), Metaphysics and Scientific Realism: Essays in Honour of David Malet Armstrong. De Gruyter 233-252.
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  47. Francesco Orilia (2004). Due dogmi dell'ontologia. Rivista di Estetica 44 (26):37-45.
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  48. Francesco Orilia (1993). Donne, fuoco e verità. Nuova Civiltà Delle Macchine 11 (1):87-99.
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  49. Francesco Orilia (2008). Goodman ei segni iconici. Rivista di Estetica 48 (38):165-180.
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  50. Francesco Orilia (1992). Intelligenza artificiale e proprietà mentali. Nuova Civiltà Delle Macchine 10 (2):44-63.
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