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Francisco Benzoni [4]Francisco J. Benzoni [1]
  1. Francisco Benzoni (2009). The Moral Worth of Creatures: Neo-Classical Metaphysics and the Value Theories of Rolston and Callicott. Environmental Values 18 (1):5 - 32.
    After showing that Rolston's and Callicott's value theories are fundamentally flawed, I demonstrate that a value theory grounded in neoclassical, or process, metaphysics avoids the problems in, and incorporates insights from, these accounts. A fundamental thesis of neoclassical metaphysics is that individual creatures at all levels of reality (from non-sensuous, non-conscious to self-conscious) are subjects of experience. Since individuals are subjects, this value theory meets Callicott's legitimate demand that value requires a valuer. And because such subjectivity does not depend on (...)
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  2. Deane-Peter Baker, Francisco J. Benzoni, Olivier Boulnois, David B. Burrell, Peter M. Candler, Conor Cunningham, John W. Carlson, Austin Dacey, N. Y. Amherst & Lawrence Dewan (2008). An Asterisk Denotes a Publication by a Member of the American Catholic Philosophical Association. The Editors Welcome Suggestions for Reviews. Altman, Matthew C. A Companion to Kant's Critique of Pure Reason. Boulder: Westview Press, 2008. Pp. Xviii+ 232. Paper $30.00, ISBN: 978-0-8133-4383-6. [REVIEW] American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 82 (2).
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  3. Francisco Benzoni (2008). Creatures as Creative. Environmental Ethics 28 (1):37-56.
    Alfred North Whitehead’s metaphysics provides a means for overcoming the dualism embedded in J. Baird Callicott’s “postmodern” axiology. Indeed, the lessons Callicott draws from the new physics and ecology imply Whitehead’s position. While Callicott holds that subjectivity and valuing require consciousness, Whitehead argues that subjectivity and valuing characterize all metaphysically basic entities, conscious and non-conscious. Removing the constraint that valuing requires consciousness is a slight shift, but it makes all the difference. By jettisoning this constraint, we can develop a robust (...)
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  4. Francisco Benzoni (2006). Creatures as Creative: Callicott and Whitehead on Creaturely Value. Environmental Ethics 28 (1):37-56.
    Alfred North Whitehead’s metaphysics provides a means for overcoming the dualism embedded in J. Baird Callicott’s “postmodern” axiology. Indeed, the lessons Callicott draws from the new physics and ecology imply Whitehead’s position. While Callicott holds that subjectivity and valuing require consciousness, Whitehead argues that subjectivity and valuing characterize all metaphysically basic entities, conscious and non-conscious. Removing the constraint that valuing requires consciousness is a slight shift, but it makes all the difference. By jettisoning this constraint, we can develop a robust (...)
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  5. Francisco Benzoni (1996). Rolston's Theological Ethic. Environmental Ethics 18 (4):339-352.
    The centerpiece of Holmes Rolston, III’s environmental ethic is his objective value theory. It is ultimately grounded not in the Cartesian duality between subject and object, but in the divine. It is not his value theory, but rather his anthropology that is the weak link in an ethic in which he attempts to weave together the natural, human, and divine spheres. With a richer, more fully developed theological anthropology, Rolston could more deeply penetrate and critique those aspects of the present (...)
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