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  1. Françoise Baylis, Jocelyn Downie & Nuala Kenny (forthcoming). Children and Decisionmaking in Health Research. IRB: Ethics & Human Research.
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  2. Françoise Baylis & Jocelyn Downie (2014). Achieving National Altruistic Self-Sufficiency in Human Eggs for Third-Party Reproduction in Canada. International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 7 (2):164-184.
    In Canada, the use of reproductive technologies is largely governed by the Assisted Human Reproduction Act . One of the founding principles of the AHR Act is that “trade in the reproductive capabilities of women and men, and the exploitation of children, women and men for commercial ends raise health and ethical concerns that justify their prohibition” ). This principle is instantiated in several sections of the AHR Act, including s. 7, which prohibits the purchase of gametes. It follows that, (...)
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  3. Françoise Baylis & Jocelyn Downie (2014). Introduction. International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 7 (2):1-9.
    Transnational reproductive travel is a largely unfettered multibillion-dollar global industry that flourishes, in part, by capitalizing on differences in legal regimes, wages and standards of living, and cultural and ethical norms. Indeed, as Scott Carney explains with respect to the commercialization of human eggs for third-party reproduction, “internationalization has made oversight laughable. … [R]egulators are dogs with no teeth” . While professional organizations can introduce guidelines and nation-states can introduce laws, the fact is that patients can travel to places where (...)
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  4. Carolyn McLeod & Francoise Baylis (eds.) (2014). Family Making: Contemporary Ethical Challenges. Oxford University Press.
    This book concerns the ethics of having children through adoption or technologically-assisted reproduction. Some people who choose between these methods struggle between them. Others do not agonize in this way, perhaps because they have a profound desire for a genetic link to the child(ren) they will parent and so prefer assisted reproduction, they view adoption as the only morally decent choice in an overcrowded world, or for some other reason. This book critically examines moral choices that involve each of these (...)
     
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  5. Françoise Baylis (2013). “I Am Who I Am”: On the Perceived Threats to Personal Identity From Deep Brain Stimulation. [REVIEW] Neuroethics 6 (3):513-526.
    This article explores the notion of the dislocated self following deep brain stimulation (DBS) and concludes that when personal identity is understood in dynamic, narrative, and relational terms, the claim that DBS is a threat to personal identity is deeply problematic. While DBS may result in profound changes in behaviour, mood and cognition (characteristics closely linked to personality), it is not helpful to characterize DBS as threatening to personal identity insofar as this claim is either false, misdirected or trivially true. (...)
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  6. Jocelyn Downie & Françoise Baylis (2013). Transnational Trade in Human Eggs: Law, Policy, and (In)Action in Canada. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 41 (1):224-239.
    In this paper, we provide as accurate a picture as possible of transnational trade in human eggs involving Canadians. We explain the legal status in Canada, and call for reform in the regulation, of such trade.
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  7. Francoise Baylis & Chris Kaposy (2011). Ideal Ethical Standards for Contraceptive Use. IRB: Ethics & Human Research 33 (2):19-20.
    A letter to the editor from Françoise Baylis and Chris Kaposy concerning the recent commentary by Toby Schonfeld and colleagues , which was written in response to Baylis and Kaposy’s article.
     
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  8. Frederic Bretzner, Frederic Gilbert, Françoise Baylis & Robert M. Brownstone (2011). Target Populations for First-In-Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research in Spinal Cord Injury. Cell Stem Cell 8 (5):468-475.
    Geron recently announced that it had begun enrolling patients in the world's first-in-human clinical trial involving cells derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). This trial raises important questions regarding the future of hESC-based therapies, especially in spinal cord injury (SCI) patients. We address some safety and efficacy concerns with this research, as well as the ethics of fair subject selection. We consider other populations that might be better for this research: chronic complete SCI patients for a safety trial, subacute (...)
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  9. Chris Kaposy & Françoise Baylis (2011). The Common Rule, Pregnant Women, and Research: No Need to “Rescue” That Which Should Be Revised. American Journal of Bioethics 11 (5):60-62.
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  10. Chris Kaposy & Francoise Baylis (2010). Ethical, Evidence-Based Guidelines for Contraceptive Use in Research. IRB: Ethics & Human Research 32 (5):1-9.
    The institutional review board at the University of Nebraska Medical Center has a policy on contraceptive use in research that aims to balance the protection of potential fetuses from potential harm resulting from drug exposure in research against respect for the autonomy of women research participants. The policy draws on the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s Use-in-Pregnancy categories in an innovative way. These categories are meant to help prevent the exposure of fetuses to harmful drugs when used for therapy by (...)
     
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  11. Jeff Nisker, Françoise Baylis, Isabel Karpin, Carolyn McLeod & Roxanne Mykitiuk (eds.) (2010). The 'Healthy' Embryo: Social, Biomedical, Legal and Philosophical Perspectives. Cambridge University Press.
    Public attention on embryo research has never been greater. Modern reproductive medicine technology and the use of embryos to generate stem cells ensure that this will continue to be a topic of debate and research across many disciplines. This multidisciplinary book explores the concept of a 'healthy' embryo, its implications on the health of children and adults, and how perceptions of what constitutes child and adult health influence the concept of embryo 'health'. The concept of human embryo health is considered (...)
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  12. Françoise Baylis (2009). “Babies with Some Animal DNA in Them”: A Woman's Choice? International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 2 (2):75-96.
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  13. Françoise Baylis (2009). For Love or Money? The Saga of Korean Women Who Provided Eggs for Embryonic Stem Cell Research. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 30 (5):385-396.
    In 2004 and 2005, Woo-Suk Hwang achieved international stardom with publications in Science reporting on successful research involving the creation of stem cells from cloned human embryos. The wonder and success all began to unravel, however, when serious ethical concerns were raised about the source of the eggs for this research. When the egg scandal had completely unfolded, it turned out that many of the women who provided eggs for stem cell research had not provided valid consents and that nearly (...)
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  14. Françoise Baylis (2009). Forthcoming. Nonhuman Animal Eggs for Assisted Human Reproduction: A Woman's Choice. International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 2 (2).
  15. Françoise Baylis (2009). The Hfea Public Consultation Process on Hybrids and Chimeras: Informed, Effective, and Meaningful? Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 19 (1):pp. 41-62.
    In September 2007, the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority (HFEA) in the United Kingdom concluded that "there is no fundamental reason to prevent cytoplasmic hybrid research . . . this area of research can, with caution and careful scrutiny, be permitted." Later, in January 2008, HFEA issued two research licenses to create humanesque cytoplasmic hybrid embryos from which stem cells could be derived. This article critically examines the public consultation process that preceded these decisions, concluding that the process was flawed (...)
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  16. Françoise Baylis & Jocelyn Downie (2009). Drilling Down in Neuroethics. Bioethics 23 (6).
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  17. Françoise Baylis & Matthew Herder (2009). Policy Design for Human Embryo Research in Canada: A History (Part 1 of 2). [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 6 (1):109-122.
    This article is the first in a two-part review of policy design for human embryo research in Canada. In this article we explain how this area of research is circumscribed by law promulgated by the federal Parliament (the Assisted Human Reproduction Act ) and by guidelines issued by the Tri-Agencies (the Tri-Council Policy Statement: Ethical Conduct for Research Involving Humans and Updated Guidelines for Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Research ). In so doing, we provide the first comprehensive account of the (...)
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  18. Françoise Baylis & Matthew Herder (2009). Policy Design for Human Embryo Research in Canada: An Analysis (Part 2 of 2). [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 6 (3):351-365.
    This article is the second in a two-part review of policy design for human embryo research in Canada. In the first article in 6(1) of the JBI , we explain how this area of research is circumscribed by law promulgated by the federal Parliament and by guidelines adopted by the Tri-Agencies, and we provide a chronological description of relevant policy initiatives and outcomes related to these two policy instruments, with particular attention to the repeated efforts at public consultation. This second (...)
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  19. Andrew Fenton, Letitia Meynell & Françoise Baylis (2009). Ethical Challenges and Interpretive Difficulties with Non-Clinical Applications of Pediatric fMRI. American Journal of Bioethics 9 (1):3-13.
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  20. Andrew Fenton, Letitia Meynell & Francoise Baylis (2009). Responsibility and Speculation: On Possible Applications of Pediatric fMRI. American Journal of Bioethics 9 (1):1-2.
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  21. Françoise Baylis, Nuala P. Kenny & Susan Sherwin (2008). A Relational Account of Public Health Ethics. Public Health Ethics 1 (3):196-209.
    oise Baylis, 1234 Le Marchant Street, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada B3H 3P7. Tel.: (902)-494–2873; Fax: (902)-494-2924; Email: francoise.baylis{at}dal.ca ' + u + '@' + d + ' '//--> . Abstract Recently, there has been a growing interest in public health and public health ethics. Much of this interest has been tied to efforts to draw up national and international plans to deal with a global pandemic. It is common for these plans to state the importance of drawing upon a well-developed (...)
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  22. Francoise Baylis (2008). Animal Eggs for Stem Cell Research: A Path Not Worth Taking. American Journal of Bioethics 8 (12):18-32.
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  23. Francoise Baylis (2008). Choosing A Path: Setting a Course for the Journey. American Journal of Bioethics 8 (12):4-6.
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  24. Françoise Baylis (2008). Global Norms in Bioethics: Problems and Prospects. In Ronald M. Green, Aine Donovan & Steven A. Jauss (eds.), Global Bioethics: Issues of Conscience for the Twenty-First Century. OUP Oxford
     
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  25. Françoise Baylis, Sanda Rodgers & David Young (2008). Ethical Dilemmas in the Care of Pregnant Women: Rethinking ''Maternal–Fetal Conflicts''. In Peter A. Singer & A. M. Viens (eds.), The Cambridge Textbook of Bioethics. Cambridge University Press
  26. Françoise Baylis (2007). A Modest Proposal. A Letter to the Editor. Hastings Center Report 37 (6):8-9.
     
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  27. Françoise Baylis (2007). Of Courage, Honor, and Integrity. In Lisa A. Eckenwiler & Felicia Cohn (eds.), The Ethics of Bioethics: Mapping the Moral Landscape. Johns Hopkins University Press
     
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  28. Françoise Baylis, Robert H. Blank, Courtney S. Campbell, Anjan Chatterjee, Lauren A. Clark, Hubert Doucet, Jocelyn Downie & Kathinka Evers (2007). Bette Anton, MLS, is Head Librarian for the Pamela & Kenneth Fong Optometry & Health Sciences Library of the University of California, Berkeley. This Library Serves the UC Berkeley School of Optometry and the UC Berkeley–UC San Francisco Joint Medical Program. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 16:121-123.
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  29. Françoise Baylis & Andrew Fenton (2007). Chimera Research and Stem Cell Therapies for Human Neurodegenerative Disorders. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 16 (02):195-208.
    This work was supported, in part, by a Stem Cell Network grant to Françoise Baylis and Jason Scott Robert and a CIHR grant to Françoise Baylis. We sincerely thank Alan Fine, Rich Campbell, Cynthia Cohen, and Tim Krahn for helpful comments on an earlier draft of this paper. Thanks are also owed to Tim Krahn for his research assistance. An earlier version of this paper was presented to the Department of Bioethics and the Novel Tech Ethics research team . We (...)
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  30. Françoise Baylis & Carolyn McLeod (2007). The Stem Cell Debate Continues: The Buying and Selling of Eggs for Research. Journal of Medical Ethics 33 (12):726-731.
    Now that stem cell scientists are clamouring for human eggs for cloning-based stem cell research, there is vigorous debate about the ethics of paying women for their eggs. Generally speaking, some claim that women should be paid a fair wage for their reproductive labour or tissues, while others argue against the further commodification of reproductive labour or tissues and worry about voluntariness among potential egg providers. Siding mainly with those who believe that women should be financially compensated for providing eggs (...)
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  31. Françoise Baylis & Jason Scott Robert (2007). Part-Human Chimeras: Worrying the Facts, Probing the Ethics. American Journal of Bioethics 7 (5):41 – 45.
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  32. Carolyn Mcleod & Françoise Baylis (2007). Donating Fresh Versus Frozen Embryos to Stem Cell Research: In Whose Interests? Bioethics 21 (9):465–477.
    Some stem cell researchers believe that it is easier to derive human embryonic stem cells from fresh rather than frozen embryos and they have had in vitro fertilization (IVF) clinicians invite their infertility patients to donate their fresh embryos for research use. These embryos include those that are deemed 'suitable for transfer' (i.e. to the woman's uterus) and those deemed unsuitable in this regard. This paper focuses on fresh embryos deemed suitable for transfer - hereafter 'fresh embryos'- which IVF patients (...)
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  33. Michael Benatar, Leslie Cannold, Dena Davis, Merle Spriggs, Julian Savulescu, Heather Draper, Neil Evans, Richard Hull, Stephen Wilkinson, David Wasserman, Donna Dickenson, Guy Widdershoven, Françoise Baylis, Stephen Coleman, Rosemarie Tong, Hilde Lindemann, David Neil & Alex John London (2006). Cutting to the Core: Exploring the Ethics of Contested Surgeries. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    When the benefits of surgery do not outweigh the harms or where they do not clearly do so, surgical interventions become morally contested. Cutting to the Core examines a number of such surgeries, including infant male circumcision and cutting the genitals of female children, the separation of conjoined twins, surgical sex assignment of intersex children and the surgical re-assignment of transsexuals, limb and face transplantation, cosmetic surgery, and placebo surgery.
     
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  34. Jonathan Kimmelman, Françoise Baylis & Kathleen Cranley Glass (2006). Stem Cell Trials: Lessons From Gene Transfer Research. Hastings Center Report 36 (1):23-26.
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  35. Carolyn McLeod & Françoise Baylis (2006). Feminists on the Inalienability of Human Embryos. Hypatia 21 (1):1-14.
    The feminist literature against the commodification of embryos in human embryo research includes an argument to the effect that embryos are "intimately connected" to persons, or morally inalienable from them. We explore why embryos might be inalienable to persons and why feminists might find this view appealing. But, ultimately, as feminists, we reject this view because it is inconsistent with full respect for women's reproductive autonomy and with a feminist conception of persons as relational, embodied beings. Overall, feminists should avoid (...)
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  36. Lynette Reid, Josephine Johnston & Françoise Baylis (2006). From the Special Issue Editors. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 3 (1-2):11-13.
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  37. Fritz Allhoff, Françoise Baylis, Richard Glen Boire, Christopher Buford, Tom Buller, Raymond DeVries, Hubert Doucet, Kathinka Evers, Joseph Fins & Ruth L. Fischbach (2005). First Page Preview. American Journal of Bioethics 5 (2).
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  38. Françoise Baylis (2005). Embryological Viability. American Journal of Bioethics 5 (6):17 – 18.
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  39. Lynette Reid & Françoise Baylis (2005). Brains, Genes, and the Making of the Self. American Journal of Bioethics 5 (2):21 – 23.
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  40. Jason Scott Robert & Françoise Baylis (2005). Stem Cell Politics: The NAS Prohibitions Pack More Bark Than Bite. Hastings Center Report 35 (6):15-16.
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  41. George Annas, Armand H. Matheny Antommaria, John D. Arras, Mary Ann Baily, Françoise Baylis, Leah Belsky, Henry S. Richardson, Michael Bérubé, Alistair Campbell & Arthur Caplan (2004). Following is the Comprehensive Index for Volume 34 of the Hastings Center Report Covering All Feature Material From 2004. Letters Have Not Been Included. Ffl Complete Issues Are Available for Volume 34 (2004) and May Be Purchased for $16.00 Each, Plus Shipping. Please Contact the Membership Department, The Hastings Center, 21 Malcolm Gordon Road, Garrison, NY 10524-5555; Tel.:(845) 424-4040; Fax:(845) 424-4545; E-Mail: Publications@ Thehastingscenter. Org. [REVIEW] Hastings Center Report 34.
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  42. Françoise Baylis (2004). A Face is Not Just Like a Hand: Pace Barker. American Journal of Bioethics 4 (3):30 – 32.
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  43. Francoise Baylis, Jocelyn Downie, Barry Hoffmaster & Susan Sherwin (eds.) (2004). Health Care Ethics in Canada. Harcourt Brace.
    The third edition of Health Care Ethics in Canada builds on the commitment to Canadian content established in earlier editions without sacrificing breadth or rigor.
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  44. Françoise Baylis & Jason Scott Robert (2004). The Inevitability of Genetic Enhancement Technologies. Bioethics 18 (1):1–26.
    We outline a number of ethical objections to genetic technologies aimed at enhancing human capacities and traits. We then argue that, despite the persuasiveness of some of these objections, they are insufficient to stop the development and use of genetic enhancement technologies. We contend that the inevitability of the technologies results from a particular guiding worldview of humans as masters of the human evolutionary future, and conclude that recognising this worldview points to new directions for ethical thinking about genetic enhancement (...)
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  45. Françoise Baylis (2003). Black as Me: Narrative Identity. Developing World Bioethics 3 (2):142–150.
    ABSTRACTThis commentary responds to genetic testing of African ancestry through a series of personal narratives that reveal a complex, intimate, and individualised process of identity formation. The author discusses both how her family and others outside her family have fostered and challenged her sense of black identity. She concludes by maintaining that racial identity is not in the genes but in the world in which we live and the stories we construct and are able to maintain.
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  46. Françoise Baylis & Jocelyn Downie (2003). The Limits of Altruism and Arbitrary Age Limits. American Journal of Bioethics 3 (4):19 – 21.
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  47. Jason Scott Robert & Françoise Baylis (2003). A Response to Commentators on "Crossing Species Boundaries". American Journal of Bioethics 3 (3):66-66.
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  48. Jason Scott Robert & Françoise Baylis (2003). Crossing Species Boundaries. American Journal of Bioethics 3 (3):1 – 13.
    This paper critically examines the biology of species identity and the morality of crossing species boundaries in the context of emerging research that involves combining human and nonhuman animals at the genetic or cellular level. We begin with the notion of species identity, particularly focusing on the ostensible fixity of species boundaries, and we explore the general biological and philosophical problem of defining species. Against this backdrop, we survey and criticize earlier attempts to forbid crossing species boundaries in the creation (...)
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  49. Susan Sherwin & Françoise Baylis (2003). The Feminist Health Care Ethics Consultant as Architect and Advocate. Public Affairs Quarterly 17 (2):141-158.
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  50. Françoise Baylis (2002). Human Cloning: Three Mistakes and an Alternative. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 27 (3):319 – 337.
    The current debate on the ethics of cloning humans is both uninspired and uninspiring. In large measure this is because of mistakes that permeate the discourse, including the mistake of thinking that cloning technology is strictly a reproductive technology when it is used to create whole beings. As a result, the challenge this technology represents regarding our understanding of ourselves and the species to which we belong typically is inappropriately downplayed or exaggerated. This has meant that important (albeit disquieting) societal (...)
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