1. Frank E. Poirier & Lori J. Fitton (2001). Primate Cultural Worlds: Monkeys, Apes, and Humans. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (2):349-350.
    Monkeys and apes, inhabiting variable environments and subjected to K-selection, exhibit cultural behavior transmitted horizontally and vertically, like cetaceans. Behaviors enhancing better health and nutrition, predator avoidance, or mate selection, can affect differential reproduction.Furthermore, dominance hierarchies and social status not only affect the transmission and acceptance of new behaviors but they may also affect genetic inheritance.
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  2. Frank E. Poirier & Michelle Field (2000). Pavlovian Perceptions and Primate Realities. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (2):262-262.
    The extent to which Pavlovian feed-forward mechanisms operate in primates is debatable. Monkeys and apes are long-lived, usually gregarious, and intelligent animals reliant on learned behavior. Learning occurs during play, mother-infant interactions, and grooming. We address these situations, and are hesitant to accept Domjan et al.'s reliance on Pavlovian conditioning as a major operant in primates.
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  3. Frank E. Poirier (1982). Play—Immediate or Long-Term Adaptiveness? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (1):167.
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