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Frank C. Keil [43]Frank Keil [29]Frank F. Keil [1]
  1.  7
    Leonid Rozenblit & Frank Keil (2002). The Misunderstood Limits of Folk Science: An Illusion of Explanatory Depth. Cognitive Science 26 (5):521-562.
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  2.  89
    Brent Strickland, Matthew Fisher, Frank Keil & Joshua Knobe (2014). Syntax and Intentionality: An Automatic Link Between Language and Theory-of-Mind. Cognition 133 (1):249–261.
    Three studies provided evidence that syntax influences intentionality judgments. In Experiment 1, participants made either speeded or unspeeded intentionality judgments about ambiguously intentional subjects or objects. Participants were more likely to judge grammatical subjects as acting intentionally in the speeded relative to the reflective condition (thus showing an intentionality bias), but grammatical objects revealed the opposite pattern of results (thus showing an unintentionality bias). In Experiment 2, participants made an intentionality judgment about one of the two actors in a partially (...)
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  3.  15
    Frank Keil (1998). Two Dogmas of Conceptual Empiricism: Implications for Hybrid Models of the Structure of Knowledge. Cognition 65 (2-3):103-135.
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  4.  6
    Frank C. Keil (1990). Constraints on Constraints: Surveying the Epigenetic Landscape. Cognitive Science 14 (1):135-168.
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  5.  15
    Frank C. Keil (2010). The Feasibility of Folk Science. Cognitive Science 34 (5):826-862.
    If folk science means individuals having well worked out mechanistic theories of the workings of the world, then it is not feasible. Laypeople’s explanatory understandings are remarkably coarse, full of gaps, and often full of inconsistencies. Even worse, most people overestimate their own understandings. Yet recent views suggest that formal scientists may not be so different. In spite of these limitations, science somehow works and its success offers hope for the feasibility of folk science as well. The success of science (...)
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  6.  7
    Jonathan F. Kominsky & Frank C. Keil (2014). Overestimation of Knowledge About Word Meanings: The “Misplaced Meaning” Effect. Cognitive Science 38 (8):1604-1633.
    Children and adults may not realize how much they depend on external sources in understanding word meanings. Four experiments investigated the existence and developmental course of a “Misplaced Meaning” effect, wherein children and adults overestimate their knowledge about the meanings of various words by underestimating how much they rely on outside sources to determine precise reference. Studies 1 and 2 demonstrate that children and adults show a highly consistent MM effect, and that it is stronger in young children. Study 3 (...)
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  7.  4
    Frank C. Keil, Courtney Stein, Lisa Webb, Van Dyke Billings & Leonid Rozenblit (2008). Discerning the Division of Cognitive Labor: An Emerging Understanding of How Knowledge Is Clustered in Other Minds. Cognitive Science 32 (2):259-300.
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  8.  2
    Daniel J. Simons & Frank C. Keil (1995). An Abstract to Concrete Shift in the Development of Biological Thought: The Insides Story. Cognition 56 (2):129-163.
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  9.  15
    James M. Beale & Frank C. Keil (1995). Categorical Effects in the Perception of Faces. Cognition 57 (3):217-239.
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  10.  73
    Frank Keil (2005). Doubt, Deference, and Deliberation: Understanding and Using the Division of Cognitive Labour. In Tamar Szabo Gendler & John Hawthorne (eds.), Oxford Studies in Epistemology. OUP Oxford 143.
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  11.  17
    Frank Keil (2003). Folkscience: Coarse Interpretations of a Complex Reality. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 7 (8):368-373.
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  12.  21
    Frank C. Keil & Robert A. Wilson (2000). The Shadows and Shallows of Explanation. In Frank C. Keil & Robert A. Wilson (eds.), Minds and Machines. MIT Press. 137-159.
    Reprinted, with modification, from Wilson and Keil 1998.
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  13.  19
    George E. Newman & Frank C. Keil, Where's the Essence? Developmental Shifts in Children's Beliefs About Internal Features.
    The present studies investigated children’s and adults’ intuitive beliefs about the physical nature of essences. Adults and children (ranging in age from 6 to 10 years old) were asked to reason about two different ways of determining an unknown object’s category: taking a tiny internal sample from any part of the object (distributed view of essence), or taking a sample from one specific region (localized view of essence). Results from three studies indicated that adults strongly endorsed the distributed view, and (...)
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  14.  90
    Paul Bloom & Frank C. Keil (2001). Thinking Through Language. Mind and Language 16 (4):351–367.
    What would it be like to have never learned English, but instead only to know Hopi, Mandarin Chinese, or American Sign Language? Would that change the way you think? Imagine entirely losing your language, as the result of stroke or trauma. You are aphasic, unable to speak or listen, read or write. What would your thoughts now be like? As the most extreme case, imagine having been raised without any language at all, as a wild child. What—if anything—would it be (...)
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  15.  33
    Frank C. Keil & Robert A. Wilson (2000). Explanation and Cognition. MIT Press.
    These essays draw on work in the history and philosophy of science, the philosophy of mind and language, the development of concepts in children, conceptual..
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  16.  64
    Robert A. Wilson & Frank C. Keil (1999). MIT Encyclopedia of the Cognitive Sciences. MIT Press.
  17.  14
    Benjamin M. Rottman, Jonathan F. Kominsky & Frank C. Keil (2014). Children Use Temporal Cues to Learn Causal Directionality. Cognitive Science 38 (3):489-513.
    The ability to learn the direction of causal relations is critical for understanding and acting in the world. We investigated how children learn causal directionality in situations in which the states of variables are temporally dependent (i.e., autocorrelated). In Experiment 1, children learned about causal direction by comparing the states of one variable before versus after an intervention on another variable. In Experiment 2, children reliably inferred causal directionality merely from observing how two variables change over time; they interpreted Y (...)
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  18.  13
    Grant Gutheil, Alonzo Vera & Frank C. Keil (1998). Do Houseflies Think? Patterns of Induction and Biological Beliefs in Development. Cognition 66 (1):33-49.
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  19.  39
    Robert A. Wilson & Frank C. Keil (1998). The Shadows and Shallows of Explanation. Minds and Machines 8 (1):137-159.
    We introduce two notions–the shadows and the shallows of explanation–in opening up explanation to broader, interdisciplinary investigation. The shadows of explanation refer to past philosophical efforts to provide either a conceptual analysis of explanation or in some other way to pinpoint the essence of explanation. The shallows of explanation refer to the phenomenon of having surprisingly limited everyday, individual cognitive abilities when it comes to explanation. Explanations are ubiquitous, but they typically are not accompanied by the depth that we might, (...)
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  20.  2
    Candice M. Mills & Frank C. Keil (2008). Children’s Developing Notions of Partiality. Cognition 107 (2):528-551.
  21. Patricia Smith Churchland, Rick Grush, Rob Wilson & Frank Keil, Computation and the Brain.
    Two very different insights motivate characterizing the brain as a computer. One depends on mathematical theory that defines computability in a highly abstract sense. Here the foundational idea is that of a Turing machine. Not an actual machine, the Turing machine is really a conceptual way of making the point that any well-defined function could be executed, step by step, according to simple 'if-you-are-in-state-P-and-have-input-Q-then-do-R' rules, given enough time (maybe infinite time) [see COMPUTATION]. Insofar as the brain is a device whose (...)
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  22. Frank C. Keil (1986). The Acquisition of Natural Kind and Artifact Terms. In William Demopoulos (ed.), Language Learning and Concept Acquisition. Ablex 133--153.
     
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  23.  3
    Frank C. Keil (2010). When and Why Do Hedgehogs and Foxes Differ? Critical Review 22 (4):415-426.
    Philip E. Tetlock's finding that "hedgehog" experts are worse predictors than "foxes" offers fertile ground for future research. Are experts as likely to exhibit hedgehog- or fox-like tendencies in areas that call for explanatory, diagnostic, and skill-based expertise-as they did when Tetlock called on experts to make predictions? Do particular domains of expertise curtail or encourage different styles of expertise? Can we trace these different styles to childhood? Finally, can we nudge hedgehogs to be more like foxes? Current research can (...)
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  24.  36
    Paul Bloom & Frank C. Keil (2001). Thinking Through Language. Mind and Language 16 (4):351-367.
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  25. Frank C. Keil, Marissa L. Greif & Rebekkah S. Kerner (2007). A World Apart: How Concepts of the Constructed World Are Different in Representation and in Development. In Eric Margolis & Stephen Laurence (eds.), Creations of the Mind: Theories of Artifacts and Their Representation. Oxford University Press 231--248.
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  26.  20
    Gary F. Marcus & Frank C. Keil (2008). Concepts, Correlations, and Some Challenges for Connectionist Cognition. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (6):722-723.
    Rogers & McClelland's (R&M's) précis represents an important effort to address key issues in concepts and categorization, but few of the simulations deliver what is promised. We argue that the models are seriously underconstrained, importantly incomplete, and psychologically implausible; more broadly, R&M dwell too heavily on the apparent successes without comparable concern for limitations already noted in the literature.
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  27.  84
    Frank C. Keil & Robert A. Wilson (2000). The Concept Concept: The Wayward Path of Cognitive Science. Mind and Language 15 (2-3):308-318.
    Critical discussion of Jerry Fodor's Concepts: Where Cognitive Science Went Wrong (1998).
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  28.  2
    Michael H. Kelly & Frank C. Keil (1985). The More Things Change…: Metamorphoses and Conceptual Structure. Cognitive Science 9 (4):403-416.
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  29.  7
    George E. Newman, Kristi L. Lockhart & Frank C. Keil (2010). “End-of-Life” Biases in Moral Evaluations of Others. Cognition 115 (2):343-349.
  30.  2
    Frank Keil (2010). Hybrid Vigor and Conceptual Structure. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (2-3):215-216.
    Machery rightly points out a diverse set of phenomena associated with concepts that create challenges for many traditional views of their nature. It may be premature, however, to give up such views completely. Here I defend the possibility of hybrid models of concept structure.
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  31.  2
    Grant Gutheil, Alonzo Vera & Frank C. Keil (1998). Do Houseflies Think? Patterns of Induction and Biological Beliefs in development1Portions of This Manuscript Were Presented at the Annual Meeting of the Psychonomics Society, 1988.1. [REVIEW] Cognition 66 (1):33-49.
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  32.  21
    Frank C. Keil (2008). Space—the Primal Frontier? Spatial Cognition and the Origins of Concepts. Philosophical Psychology 21 (2):241 – 250.
    The more carefully we look, the more impressive the repertoire of infant concepts seems to be. Across a wide range of tasks, infants seem to be using concepts corresponding to surprisingly high-level and abstract categories and relations. It is tempting to try to explain these abilities in terms of a core capacity in spatial cognition that emerges very early in development and then gets extended beyond reasoning about direct spatial arrays and events. Although such a spatial cognitive capacity may indeed (...)
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  33.  7
    Frank Keil, Biology and Beyond: Domain Specificity in a Broader Developmental Context.
    The assumption of domain specificity has been invaluable to the study of the emergence of biological thought in young children. Yet, domains of thought must be understood within a broader context that explains how those domains relate to the surrounding cultures, to different kinds of cognitive constraints, to framing effects, to abilities to evaluate knowledge and to the ways in which domain-specific knowledge in any individual mind is related to knowledge in other minds. All of these issues must come together (...)
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  34.  19
    Frank C. Keil (1989). Spiders in the Web of Belief: The Tangled Relations Between Concepts and Theories. Mind and Language 4 (1-2):43-50.
  35. Frank C. Keil, Daniel T. Levin, Bethany A. Richman & Grant Gutheil (1999). Mechanism and Explanation in the Development of Biological Thought: The Case of Disease. In D. Medin & S. Atran (eds.), Folkbiology. MIT Press
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  36. Frank C. Keil, Marissa L. Greif & Rebekkah S. Kerner (2007). 1. The Varieties of Artifact Kinds. In Eric Margolis & Stephen Laurence (eds.), Creations of the Mind: Theories of Artifacts and Their Representation. Oxford University Press 231.
     
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  37.  10
    Frank Keil (2011). Graceful Degradation and Conceptual Development. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 34 (3):133-134.
    In this book, Carey gives cognitive science a detailed account of the origins of concepts and an explanation of how origins stories are essential to understanding what concepts are and how we use them. At the same time, this book's details help highlight the challenge of explaining how conceptual change works with real-world concepts that often have heavily degraded internal content.
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  38.  39
    Frank Keil, The Seductive Allure of Neuroscience Explanations.
    & Explanations of psychological phenomena seem to genervs. with neuroscience) design. Crucially, the neuroscience inate more public interest when they contain neuroscientific..
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  39.  9
    Frank Keil, Reviews 859.
    H actually ran the program on a number of large pieces of English text, though from my point of view, it’s the ability and the willingness to do this that is the motivation of learning Perl. H’s Perl code takes all periods ‘.’ to mark sentence breaks, and of course not all periods really do mark sentence breaks: the previous one earlier in this sentence does not, nor does the period after an abbreviation, most of the time—though the next one (...)
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  40.  2
    Frank C. Keil (1991). Godzilla Vs. Mothra and the Sydney Opera House: Boundary Conditions on Functional Architecture in Infant Visual Perception and Beyond. Mind and Language 6 (3):239-251.
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  41.  25
    Frank C. Keil (2008). How to Learn Multiple Tasks. Biological Theory 3 (1):30-41.
    The article examines the question of how learning multiple tasks interacts with neural architectures and the flow of information through those architectures. It approaches the question by using the idealization of an artificial neural network where it is possible to ask more precise questions about the effects of modular versus nonmodular architectures as well as the effects of sequential versus simultaneous learning of tasks. A prior work has demonstrated a clear advantage of modular architectures when the two tasks must be (...)
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  42.  5
    Benjamin M. Rottman & Frank C. Keil (2011). What Matters in Scientific Explanations: Effects of Elaboration and Content. Cognition 121 (3):324-337.
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  43. Frank Keil (1981). Children's Thinking: What Never Develops? Cognition 10 (1-3):159-166.
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  44.  15
    Frank Keil, Children's Sensitivity to Circular Explanations.
    The ability to evaluate the quality of explanations is an essential part of children’s intellectual growth. Explanations can be faulty in structural ways such as when they are circular. A circular explanation reiterates the question as if it were an explanation rather than providing any new information. Two experiments (N = 77) examined children’s preferences when faced with circular and noncircular explanations. The results demonstrate that a preference for noncircular explanations is present, albeit in a fragile form, by 5 or (...)
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  45.  20
    Frank C. Keil, By Domains: The Origins of Concepts Of.
    domains as rareiied as a cardiologistRi7;s knowledge of arrhythmia to those as commonplace as everyday folk psychology. Domains can vary from the highly concrete causally rich relations in a naive mechanics of physical objects to the highly abstract noncausal relations of mathematics or natural language syntax. Lumping together all of these different sorts of domains so as to have similar effects on cognitive development is likely to be misleading and un· informative. In this chapter, I consider some distinctions and their (...)
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  46.  19
    Frank Keil, Derek E Lyons, Laurie R Santos and Frank C Keil.
    uniquely human ability. We are thus left with a fascinating question: if not imitation, what are mirror neurons for? Recent..
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  47.  17
    Frank Keil, Getting to the Truth.
    One aspect of truth concerns knowing when to trust others when one’s own knowledge is inadequate. This is an ever more common problem in societies where technological and scientific change seems to be constantly accelerating. There is an increasing need to rely on the expertise of others and consequently to know when others are more likely to be offering an objective opinion as opposed to a biased one. Here, I argue that there are systematic and early emerging cognitive heuristics and (...)
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  48.  19
    Frank Keil, Nurturing Nativism.
    empiricist approaches to knowledge acquisition. I say " appears" because so often the debaters seem to be talking past each other, arguing about different things or misunderstanding each other in such basic ways that the debates can seem to an observer as incoherent. For these reasons there has been a powerful need for a systematic treatment of the different senses of nativism and empiricism that considers both their historical contexts and their current manifestations. Cowie's book offers such a treatment, one (...)
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  49.  18
    Frank C. Keil, Structural Determinants of Interventions on Causal Systems.
    We investigate how people use causal knowledge to design interventions to affect the outcomes of causal systems. We propose that in addition to using content or mechanism knowledge to evaluate the effectiveness of interventions, people are also influenced by the abstract structural properties of a causal system. In particular, we investigated two factors that influence whether people tend to intervene proximally (on the immediate cause of an outcome of interest) or distally (on the root cause of a chain leading to (...)
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  50.  1
    Brent Strickland & Frank Keil (2011). Event Completion: Event Based Inferences Distort Memory in a Matter of Seconds. Cognition 121 (3):409-415.
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