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  1. Franklin G. Miller & Andrew F. Short (forthcoming). Adverstising for Clinical Research. Irb.
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  2. Franklin G. Miller & David Wendler (forthcoming). Assessing the Ethics of Ethics Research: A Case Study. Irb.
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  3. Howard Brody & Franklin G. Miller (2013). The Research‐Clinical Practice Distinction, Learning Health Systems, and Relationships. Hastings Center Report 43 (5):41-47.
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  4. Emily A. Largent, Franklin G. Miller & Steven Joffe (2013). A Prescription for Ethical Learning. Hastings Center Report 43 (s1):28-29.
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  5. Emily Largent, Christine Grady, Franklin G. Miller & Alan Wertheimer (2013). Misconceptions About Coercion and Undue Influence: Reflections on the Views of Irb Members. Bioethics 27 (9):500-507.
    Payment to recruit research subjects is a common practice but raises ethical concerns relating to the potential for coercion or undue influence. We conducted the first national study of IRB members and human subjects protection professionals to explore attitudes as to whether and why payment of research participants constitutes coercion or undue influence. Upon critical evaluation of the cogency of ethical concerns regarding payment, as reflected in our survey results, we found expansive or inconsistent views about coercion and undue influence (...)
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  6. Franklin G. Miller (2013). Two Philosophical Deaths: Hume and Hitchens. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 56 (2):251-258.
    What is a good death? How does one live well in the face of (potentially) terminal illness? Philosophical analysis has a great deal to offer in approaching these puzzling and deep questions. Perhaps more can be gleaned of cultural and personal significance, however, from narratives of those who have been forced to face these questions in their lives and in their writings. The greatest yield, I suggest, comes from combining narrative with philosophical reflections.Commentators have frequently contrasted the way we die (...)
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  7. Franklin G. Miller & Luke Gelinas (2013). Nudging, Autonomy, and Valid Consent: Context Matters. American Journal of Bioethics 13 (6):12-13.
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  8. Roseanna Sommers & Franklin G. Miller (2013). Forgoing Debriefing in Deceptive Research: Is It Ever Ethical? Ethics and Behavior 23 (2):98-116.
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  9. Franklin G. Miller (2012). Clarifying the Nocebo Effect and Its Ethical Implications. American Journal of Bioethics 12 (3):30-31.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 12, Issue 3, Page 30-31, March 2012.
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  10. Franklin G. Miller (2012). Homage to Henry Beecher (1904-1976). Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 55 (2):218-229.
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  11. Franklin G. Miller (2012). The Ethical Challenge of Human Research. Oxford University Press.
    This book contains 22 essays on the ethics of research involving human subjects written over a 15-year period. Topics addressed include the ethics of clinical trials, controversial study designs, and informed consent.
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  12. Franklin G. Miller & Robert D. Truog (2012). Going All the Way: Ethical Clarity and Ethical Progress. American Journal of Bioethics 12 (6):10-11.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 12, Issue 6, Page 10-11, June 2012.
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  13. Robert D. Truog & Franklin G. Miller (2012). Brain Death: Justifications and Critiques. Clinical Ethics 7 (3):128-132.
    Controversies about the diagnosis and meaning of brain death have existed as long as the concept itself. Here we review the historical development of brain death, and then evaluate the various attempts to justify the claim that patients who are diagnosed as brain dead can be considered dead for all legal and social purposes, and especially with regard to procuring their vital organs for transplantation. While we agree with most commentators that death should be defined as the loss of integration (...)
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  14. Emily A. Largent, Steven Joffe & Franklin G. Miller (2011). Can RESEARCH and CARE Be Ethically Integrated? Hastings Center Report 41 (4):37-46.
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  15. Franklin G. Miller (2011). On Authorship. American Journal of Bioethics 11 (10):32 - 33.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 11, Issue 10, Page 32-33, October 2011.
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  16. Franklin G. Miller & Luana Colloca (2011). The Placebo Phenomenon and Medical Ethics: Rethinking the Relationship Between Informed Consent and Risk–Benefit Assessment. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 32 (4):229-243.
    It has been presumed within bioethics that the benefits and risks of treatments can be assessed independently of information disclosure to patients as part of the informed consent process. Research on placebo and nocebo effects indicates that this is not true for symptomatic treatments. The benefits and risks that patients experience from symptomatic treatments can be shaped powerfully by information about these treatments provided by clinicians. In this paper we discuss the implications of placebo and nocebo research for risk–benefit assessment (...)
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  17. Franklin G. Miller & Steven Joffe (2011). Science, Ethics, and Politics: The Case of Avastin. Hastings Center Report 41 (5):5-5.
     
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  18. Franklin G. Miller & Steven Joffe (2011). The Health Care Cost Monitor. Hastings Center Report 41 (5):5-6.
     
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  19. Franklin G. Miller & Robert Truog (2011). Death, Dying, and Organ Donation: Reconstructing Medical Ethics at the End of Life. Oxford University Press.
    This book challenges fundamental doctrines of established medical ethics. It is argued that the routine practice of stopping life support technology causes the death of patients and that donors of vital organs (hearts, liver, lungs, and both kidneys) are not really dead at the time that their organs are removed for life-saving transplantation. Although these practices are ethically legitimate, they are not compatible with traditional medical ethics: they conflict with the norms that doctors must not intentionally cause the death of (...)
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  20. Franklin G. Miller & Alan Wertheimer (2011). The Fair Transaction Model of Informed Consent: An Alternative to Autonomous Authorization. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 21 (3):201-218.
    Prevailing ethical thinking about informed consent to clinical research is characterized by theoretical confidence and practical disquiet. On the one hand, bioethicists are confident that informed consent is a fundamental norm. And, for the most part, they are confident that what makes consent to research valid is that it constitutes an autonomous authorization by the research participant. On the other hand, bioethicists are uneasy about the quality of consent in practice. One major source of this disquiet is substantial evidence of (...)
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  21. Ori Lev, Franklin G. Miller & Ezekiel J. Emanuel (2010). The Ethics of Research on Enhancement Interventions. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 20 (2):101-113.
    Traditionally, biomedical research has been devoted to improvement in the understanding and treatment or prevention of disease. Building on the knowledge generated by the long history of disease-oriented research, the next few decades will witness an explosion of biomedical enhancements to make people faster, stronger, smarter, less forgetful, happier, prettier, and live longer (Turner et al. 2003; Vastag 2004; Rose 2002). As with other biomedical interventions, research to assess the safety and efficacy of these enhancements in humans should be conducted (...)
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  22. Franklin G. Miller (2010). Life Plans. The Monist 93 (1):17-37.
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  23. Franklin G. Miller (2010). Striking the Right Balance in Research Ethics and Regulation. American Journal of Bioethics 10 (8):65-65.
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  24. Franklin G. Miller & Luana Colloca (2010). Semiotics and the Placebo Effect. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 53 (4):509-516.
    Despite growing scientific interest in the placebo effect and increasing understanding of neurobiological mechanisms (Finniss et al. 2010), theoretical conceptualization of the placebo effect remains primitive (Miller, Colloca, and Kaptchuk 2009). Mechanistic research on this phenomenon appears largely free-floating, with little guidance by any systematic theoretical paradigm. A partial explanation is the pervasive conceptual confusion that characterizes thinking about the placebo effect. The philosopher of science Adolf Grunbaum noted that "the medical and psychiatric literature on placebos and their effects is (...)
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  25. Franklin G. Miller, Robert D. Truog & Dan W. Brock (2010). Moral Fictions and Medical Ethics. Bioethics 24 (9):453-460.
    Conventional medical ethics and the law draw a bright line distinguishing the permitted practice of withdrawing life-sustaining treatment from the forbidden practice of active euthanasia by means of a lethal injection. When clinicians justifiably withdraw life-sustaining treatment, they allow patients to die but do not cause, intend, or have moral responsibility for, the patient's death. In contrast, physicians unjustifiably kill patients whenever they intentionally administer a lethal dose of medication. We argue that the differential moral assessment of these two practices (...)
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  26. Franklin G. Miller & Alan Wertheimer (eds.) (2010). The Ethics of Consent: Theory and Practice. Oxford University Press.
    This book assembles the contributions of a distinguished group of scholars concerning the ethics of consent in theory and practice.
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  27. Franklin G. Miller (2009). A Planned Death in the Family. Hastings Center Report 39 (2):28-30.
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  28. Franklin G. Miller, Luana Colloca & Ted J. Kaptchuk (2009). The Placebo Effect: Illness and Interpersonal Healing. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 52 (4):518-539.
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  29. Franklin G. Miller & Robert D. Truog (2009). The Incoherence of Determining Death by Neurological Criteria: A Commentary on Controversies in the Determination of Death, A White Paper by the President's Council on Bioethics. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 19 (2):185-193.
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  30. Franklin G. Miller & Robert D. Truog (2009). The Incoherence of Determining Death by Neurological Criteria: Reply to John Lizza. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 19 (4):397-399.
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  31. Collin C. O'Neil & Franklin G. Miller (2009). When Scientists Deceive: Applying the Federal Regulations. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 37 (2):344-350.
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  32. David H. Brendel & Franklin G. Miller (2008). A Plea for Pragmatism in Clinical Research Ethics. American Journal of Bioethics 8 (4):24 – 31.
    Pragmatism is a distinctive approach to clinical research ethics that can guide bioethicists and members of institutional review boards (IRBs) as they struggle to balance the competing values of promoting medical research and protecting human subjects participating in it. After defining our understanding of pragmatism in the setting of clinical research ethics, we show how a pragmatic approach can provide guidance not only for the day-to-day functioning of the IRB, but also for evaluation of policy standards, such as the one (...)
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  33. Steven Joffe & Franklin G. Miller (2008). Bench to Bedside: Mapping the Moral Terrain of Clinical Research. Hastings Center Report 38 (2):30-42.
    : Medical research is widely thought to have a fundamentally therapeutic orientation, in spite of the fact that clinical research is thought to be ethically distinct from medical care. We need an entirely new conception of clinical research ethics—one that looks to science instead of the doctor-patient relationship.
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  34. Steven Joffe & Franklin G. Miller (2008). Mapping the Moral Terrain of Clinical Research. Hastings Center Report 38 (2):30-42.
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  35. Steven Joffe & Franklin G. Miller (2008). Steven Joffe and Franklin G. Miller Reply. Hastings Center Report 38 (5):7-7.
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  36. Steven Joffe & Franklin G. Miller (2008). The Sex Kitten of Bioethics? Research Ethics Comes of Age Reply. Hastings Center Report 38 (5):7-7.
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  37. Franklin G. Miller (2008). Research on Medical Records Without Informed Consent. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 36 (3):560-566.
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  38. Franklin G. Miller (2008). Recruiting Research Participants. In Ezekiel J. Emanuel (ed.), The Oxford Textbook of Clinical Research Ethics. Oxford University Press. 397.
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  39. Franklin G. Miller (2008). The Ethics of Placebo-Controlled Trials. In Ezekiel J. Emanuel (ed.), The Oxford Textbook of Clinical Research Ethics. Oxford University Press. 261.
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  40. Franklin G. Miller, John P. Gluck Jr & David Wendler (2008). Debriefing and Accountability in Deceptive Research. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 18 (3):235-251.
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  41. Franklin G. Miller, Michelle M. Mello & Steven Joffe (2008). Incidental Findings in Human Subjects Research: What Do Investigators Owe Research Participants? Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 36 (2):271-279.
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  42. Franklin G. Miller & D. L. Rosenstein (2008). Challenge Experiments. In Ezekiel J. Emanuel (ed.), The Oxford Textbook of Clinical Research Ethics. Oxford University Press. 273.
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  43. Franklin G. Miller & Robert D. Truog (2008). An Apology for Socratic Bioethics. American Journal of Bioethics 8 (7):3 – 7.
    Bioethics is a hybrid discipline. As a theoretical enterprise it stands for untrammeled inquiry and argument. Yet it aims to influence medical practice and policy. In this article we explore tensions between these two dimensions of bioethics and examine the merits and perils of a “Socratic” approach to bioethics that challenges “the conventional wisdom.”.
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  44. Franklin G. Miller & Robert D. Truog (2008). Rethinking the Ethics of Vital Organ Donations. Hastings Center Report 38 (6):38-46.
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  45. Franklin G. Miller & David Wendler (2008). Is It Ethical to Keep Interim Findings of Randomised Controlled Trials Confidential? Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (3):198-201.
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  46. Donald L. Rosenstein & Franklin G. Miller (2008). Research Involving Those at Risk for Impaired Decision-Making Capacity. In Ezekiel J. Emanuel (ed.), The Oxford Textbook of Clinical Research Ethics. Oxford University Press. 437--445.
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  47. Alan Wertheimer & Franklin G. Miller (2008). Payment for Research Participation: A Coercive Offer? Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (5):389-392.
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  48. Franklin G. Miller & Howard Brody (2007). Clinical Equipoise and the Incoherence of Research Ethics. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 32 (2):151 – 165.
    The doctrine of clinical equipoise is appealing because it appears to permit physicians to maintain their therapeutic obligation to offer optimal medical care to patients while conducting randomized controlled trials (RCTs). The appearance, however, is deceptive. In this article we argue that clinical equipoise is defective and incoherent in multiple ways. First, it conflates the sound methodological principle that RCTs should begin with an honest null hypothesis with the questionable ethical norm that participants in these trials should never be randomized (...)
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  49. Franklin G. Miller & Robert M. Veatch (2007). Symposium on Equipoise and the Ethics of Clinical Trials. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 32 (2):77 – 78.
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  50. Franklin G. Miller & Alan Wertheimer (2007). Facing Up to Paternalism in Research Ethics. Hastings Center Report 37 (3):24-34.
    : Bioethicists have failed to understand the pervasively paternalistic character of research ethics. Not only is the overall structure of research review and regulation paternalistic in some sense; even the way informed consent is sought may imply paternalism. Paternalism has limits, however. Getting clear on the paternalism of research ethics may mean some kinds of prohibited research should be reassessed.
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