Search results for 'Franklin G. Miller Robert D. Truog' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Franklin Miller & Robert Truog (2009). Franklin Miller and Robert Truog Reply. Hastings Center Report 39 (3):6-6.score: 11520.0
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  2. Franklin G. Miller Robert D. Truog (2009). The Incoherence of Determining Death by Neurological Criteria: A Commentary on Controversies in the Determination of Death , a White Paper by the President's Council on Bioethics. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 19 (2):pp. 185-193.score: 6630.0
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  3. Franklin G. Miller Robert D. Truog (2009). The Incoherence of Determining Death by Neurological Criteria: Reply to John Lizza. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 19 (4):pp. 397-399.score: 6630.0
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  4. Franklin G. Miller, Robert D. Truog & Dan W. Brock (2010). Moral Fictions and Medical Ethics. Bioethics 24 (9):453-460.score: 6540.0
    Conventional medical ethics and the law draw a bright line distinguishing the permitted practice of withdrawing life-sustaining treatment from the forbidden practice of active euthanasia by means of a lethal injection. When clinicians justifiably withdraw life-sustaining treatment, they allow patients to die but do not cause, intend, or have moral responsibility for, the patient's death. In contrast, physicians unjustifiably kill patients whenever they intentionally administer a lethal dose of medication. We argue that the differential moral assessment of these two practices (...)
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  5. Franklin G. Miller & Robert D. Truog (2008). An Apology for Socratic Bioethics. American Journal of Bioethics 8 (7):3 – 7.score: 6540.0
    Bioethics is a hybrid discipline. As a theoretical enterprise it stands for untrammeled inquiry and argument. Yet it aims to influence medical practice and policy. In this article we explore tensions between these two dimensions of bioethics and examine the merits and perils of a “Socratic” approach to bioethics that challenges “the conventional wisdom.”.
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  6. Franklin G. Miller & Robert D. Truog (2008). Rethinking the Ethics of Vital Organ Donations. Hastings Center Report 38 (6):38-46.score: 6540.0
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  7. Franklin G. Miller & Robert D. Truog (2009). The Incoherence of Determining Death by Neurological Criteria: A Commentary on Controversies in the Determination of Death, A White Paper by the President's Council on Bioethics. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 19 (2):185-193.score: 6540.0
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  8. Robert D. Truog & Franklin G. Miller (2012). Brain Death: Justifications and Critiques. Clinical Ethics 7 (3):128-132.score: 6540.0
    Controversies about the diagnosis and meaning of brain death have existed as long as the concept itself. Here we review the historical development of brain death, and then evaluate the various attempts to justify the claim that patients who are diagnosed as brain dead can be considered dead for all legal and social purposes, and especially with regard to procuring their vital organs for transplantation. While we agree with most commentators that death should be defined as the loss of integration (...)
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  9. Franklin G. Miller & Robert D. Truog (2012). Going All the Way: Ethical Clarity and Ethical Progress. American Journal of Bioethics 12 (6):10-11.score: 6540.0
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 12, Issue 6, Page 10-11, June 2012.
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  10. Franklin G. Miller & Robert D. Truog (2009). The Incoherence of Determining Death by Neurological Criteria: Reply to John Lizza. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 19 (4):397-399.score: 6540.0
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  11. Robert D. Truog & Franklin G. Miller (2014). Changing the Conversation About Brain Death. American Journal of Bioethics 14 (8):9-14.score: 6540.0
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  12. Franklin G. Miller & Robert Truog (2011). Death, Dying, and Organ Donation: Reconstructing Medical Ethics at the End of Life. Oxford University Press.score: 3800.0
    This book challenges fundamental doctrines of established medical ethics. It is argued that the routine practice of stopping life support technology causes the death of patients and that donors of vital organs (hearts, liver, lungs, and both kidneys) are not really dead at the time that their organs are removed for life-saving transplantation. Although these practices are ethically legitimate, they are not compatible with traditional medical ethics: they conflict with the norms that doctors must not intentionally cause the death of (...)
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  13. F. G. Miller, R. D. Truog & D. W. Brock (2010). The Dead Donor Rule: Can It Withstand Critical Scrutiny? Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 35 (3):299-312.score: 1920.0
    Transplantation of vital organs has been premised ethically and legally on "the dead donor rule" (DDR)—the requirement that donors are determined to be dead before these organs are procured. Nevertheless, scholars have argued cogently that donors of vital organs, including those diagnosed as "brain dead" and those declared dead according to cardiopulmonary criteria, are not in fact dead at the time that vital organs are being procured. In this article, we challenge the normative rationale for the DDR by rejecting the (...)
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  14. S. K. Shah, R. D. Truog & F. G. Miller (2011). Death and Legal Fictions. Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (12):719-722.score: 1920.0
    Advances in life-saving technologies in the past few decades have challenged our traditional understandings of death. Traditionally, death was understood to occur when a person stops breathing, their heart stops beating and they are cold to the touch. Today, physicians determine death by relying on a diagnosis of ‘total brain failure’ or by waiting a short while after circulation stops. Evidence has emerged, however, that the conceptual bases for these approaches to determining death are fundamentally flawed and depart substantially from (...)
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  15. F. G. Miller & R. D. Truog (2010). Decapitation and the Definition of Death. Journal of Medical Ethics 36 (10):632-634.score: 1920.0
    Although established in the law and current practice, the determination of death according to neurological criteria continues to be controversial. Some scholars have advocated return to the traditional circulatory and respiratory criteria for determining death because individuals diagnosed as ‘brain dead’ display an extensive range of integrated biological functioning with the aid of mechanical ventilation. Others have attempted to refute this stance by appealing to the analogy between decapitation and brain death. Since a decapitated animal is obviously dead, and ‘brain (...)
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  16. Franklin Miller & Robert Truog (2009). Wanted, Dead or Alive Reply. Hastings Center Report 39 (3):6-6.score: 1920.0
     
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  17. Benjamin E. Hippen (2012). Review of F. G. Miller and R. D. Truog,Death, Dying and Organ Transplantation: Reconstructing Medical Ethics at the End of Life. [REVIEW] American Journal of Bioethics 12 (6):56-58.score: 980.0
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 12, Issue 6, Page 56-58, June 2012.
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  18. J. P. Freer, R. D. Truog, J. C. Fackler, W. G. Bartholme & H. Morgan (1992). Brain Death and the Termination of Life Support: Case and Analysis. Journal of Clinical Ethics 3 (1):78.score: 810.0
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  19. G. E. Hardart & R. D. Truog (2005). Practicing Physicians and the Role of Family Surrogate Decision Making. Journal of Clinical Ethics 16 (4):345.score: 810.0
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  20. J. P. Lizza (2011). Where's Waldo? The 'Decapitation Gambit' and the Definition of Death. Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (12):743-746.score: 192.0
    The ‘decapitation gambit’ holds that, if physical decapitation normally entails the death of the human being, then physiological decapitation, evident in cases of total brain failure, entails the death of the human being. This argument has been challenged by Franklin Miller and Robert Truog, who argue that physical decapitation does not necessarily entail the death of human beings and that therefore, by analogy, artificially sustained human bodies with total brain failure are living human beings. They thus (...)
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  21. Ruth R. Faden, Tom L. Beauchamp & Nancy E. Kass (2011). Learning Health Care Systems and Justice. Hastings Center Report 41 (4):3-3.score: 192.0
    Emily Largent, Steven Joffe, and Franklin Miller offer a stimulating contribution to the literature on integrating medical research and practice. We agree on both the need to move toward what the Institute of Medicine has called a learning health care system and the need for new conceptions for integrating research and practice within it. We also agree with the authors’ view, first advanced by Robert Truog and colleagues in 1999, that it can be ethically acceptable to (...)
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