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  1. Franklin Perkins, The Sprout of Wisdom and the Love of Learning in Mengzi.
    The love of wisdom carries a certain absurdity. What kind of animal falls into a hole while contemplating the sky, or stands outside all night, just thinking? When Plato and Aristotle say that philosophy begins in wonder, it sounds attractive – wonderful even – but it is in those moments of contemplative wonder that the lion snatches us, or someone walks off with our backpack.
     
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  2. Franklin Perkins (2014). Heaven and Earth Are Not Humane: The Problem of Evil in Classical Chinese Philosophy. Indiana University Press.
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  3. Franklin Perkins (2014). Meyer, Dirk, Philosophy on Bamboo: Text and the Production of Meaning in Early China. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 13 (1):133-136.
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  4. Franklin Perkins (2013). The Spontaneous Generation of the Human in the “Heng Xian”. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 12 (2):225-240.
    This essay argues that the “Heng Xian” bridges between two distinct discourses that were both prevalent in the late fourth century. One discourse focused on the origination of the natural world through a spontaneous process of differentiation, a position familiar from the Daodejing and “Tai yi sheng shui.” The other focused on the specific ways in which different kinds of things live, a position known primarily from Ru discussions centering on the concept of xing 性, the nature or spontaneous reactions (...)
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  5. Franklin Perkins (2013). Wandering Beyond Tragedy. Comparative and Continental Philosophy 3 (1).
    Wandering Beyond Tragedy Content Type Journal Article Pages - Authors Franklin Thomas Perkins, Department of Philosophy, DePaul University Journal Comparative and Continental Philosophy Online ISSN 1757-0646 Print ISSN 1757-0638 Journal Volume Volume 3 Journal Issue Volume 3, Number 1 / 2011.
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  6. Franklin Perkins (2012). Of Fish and Men. The Harvard Review of Philosophy 17 (1):118-136.
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  7. Chung-Ying Cheng & Franklin Perkins (2011). Chinese Philosophy in Excavated Early Texts. Wiley-Blackwell.
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  8. Rodolphe Gasché, Franklin Perkins & Peg Birmingham (2011). A Discussion of Rodolphe Gasché's Europe, or The Infinite Task. Comparative and Continental Philosophy 3 (1):27-57.
    One of the challenges facing Continental Philosophy is how to maintain its identity as “Continental” (and thus as “European”) while avoiding the dangers of Euro-centrism. This challenge calls for many approaches, but one entry point is through the question of Europe—can we think a European identity that is pluralistic and radically open to its others, a Europe that is not Euro-centric? Rodolphe Gasché, in his recently published Europe, or the Infinite Task: A Study of a Philosophical Concept (Stanford 2009), articulates (...)
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  9. Franklin Perkins (2011). Europe and the Question of Philosophy: A Response to Rodolfe Gasché, Europe, or the Infinite Task. Comparative and Continental Philosophy 3 (1).
    Europe and the Question of Philosophy: A Response to Rodolfe Gasché, Europe, or the Infinite Task Content Type Journal Article Pages - Authors Franklin Thomas Perkins, Department of Philosophy, DePaul University Journal Comparative and Continental Philosophy Online ISSN 1757-0646 Print ISSN 1757-0638 Journal Volume Volume 3 Journal Issue Volume 3, Number 1 / 2011.
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  10. Franklin Perkins (2011). Wandering Beyond Tragedy with Zhuangzi. Comparative and Continental Philosophy 3 (1):79-98.
    One could define a “tragic” viewpoint in many ways, but its core is the claim that things in this world do not always work out for the best. Probably the greatest tragic figure in the Zhuangzi is the defiant praying mantis, who waves her arms to fend off the oncoming chariot. This praying mantis is surely a symbol of Confucius, who was said in the Lun Yu to know that what he does is impossible but to do it anyway. In (...)
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  11. Zhongying Cheng & Franklin Perkins (eds.) (2010). Chinese Philosophy in Excavated Early Texts. Wiley-Blackwell.
    T he nine papers of this Supplement on these significant issues and important ideas are closely accentuated and critically discussed by well-established specialists, philosophers and historians, from various relevant disciplines of study.
     
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  12. Franklin Perkins (2010). Recontextualizing Xing: Self-Cultivation and Human Nature in the Guodian Texts. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 37 (s1):16-32.
  13. Franklin Perkins (2010). The Ridiculousness of Attachment in the Journey to the West. In Hans-Georg Moeller & Günter Wohlfart (eds.), Laughter in Eastern and Western Philosophies: Proceedings of the Académie du Midi. Verlag Karl Alber.
     
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  14. Franklin Perkins (2009). Liang, Tao 梁濤, Guodian Bamboo Strips and the Si-Meng School 郭店竹簡與思孟學派. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 8 (3):345-348.
  15. Franklin Perkins (2009). Motivation and the Heart in the Xing Zi Ming Chu. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 8 (2):117-131.
    In both content and historical position, the “ Xing Zi Ming Chu ” is of obvious significance for understanding the development of classical Chinese philosophy, particularly Confucian moral psychology. This article aims to clarify one aspect of the text, namely, its account of human motivation. This account can be divided into two parts. The first describes human motivation primarily in passive terms of response to external forces, as emotions arise from our nature when stimulated by things in the world. The (...)
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  16. Franklin Perkins (2008). Book Review: Deconstruction and the Ethical in Asian Thought. [REVIEW] Journal of Chinese Philosophy 35:687-692.
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  17. Franklin Perkins (2008). Deconstruction and the Ethical in Asian Thought – Edited by Youru Wang. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 35 (4):687-692.
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  18. Franklin Perkins (2008). Introduction: Reconsidering the Mozi. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 35 (3):379-383.
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  19. Franklin Perkins (2008). The Moist Criticism of the Confucian Use of Fate. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 35 (3):421-436.
  20. Franklin Perkins (2007). Mencius on Becoming Human (Review). Philosophy East and West 57 (4):596-599.
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  21. Franklin Perkins (2007). Leibniz: A Guide for the Perplexed. Continuum.
    READING LEIBNIZ. Context of Leibniz's philosophy -- Difficulties of reading Leibniz -- Using this book -- GOD AND THE BEST POSSIBLE WORLD. Two principles of knowledge -- The existence of god -- The nature of God -- The best of all possible worlds -- SUBSTANCES. Substance in early modern philosophy -- The simplicity and unity of substance in Leibniz -- Substances as points of view on the universe -- Interaction and pre-established harmony -- RATIONAL MINDS. Minute perceptions and levels of (...)
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  22. Franklin Perkins (2007). The Problem of Evil in Classical Chinese Philosophy. The Proceedings of the Twenty-First World Congress of Philosophy 7:149-155.
    If the problem of evil is one of justifying how a perfect God could create evil, then there is no problem of evil in early Chinese thought, but my claim in this paper is that the problem of evil is one manifestation of a deeper problem, which is the conflict between the world and human values and desires. This deeper problem appears in early Chinese thought in ways analogous to the problem of evil in theistic traditions. Daoists respond to this (...)
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  23. Franklin Perkins (2006). Reproaching Heaven: The Problem of Evil in Mengzi. [REVIEW] Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 5 (2):293-312.
  24. Franklin Perkins (2006). Love of Learning in the Lun Yu. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 33 (4):505–515.
  25. Franklin Perkins (2005). Following Nature with Mengzi or Zhuangzi. International Philosophical Quarterly 45 (3):327-340.
    This paper examines the idea of “following nature” in two classical Chinese thinkers, Mengzi and Zhuangzi. The goal is to complicate appeals to “following nature” in Asian thought and to problematize the very imposition of the concept “nature” on Zhuangzi and Mengzi. The paper begins by establishing some common ground between Mengzi and Zhuangzi, based on two points—both view harmony with tian (heaven/nature) as a primary aspect of living well, and both require a process of self-transformation to reach this harmony. (...)
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  26. Franklin Perkins (2004). Goodness and Justice: Plato, Aristotle, and the Moderns. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 31 (1):137–140.
  27. Franklin Perkins (2004). Leibniz and China: A Commerce of Light. Cambridge University Press.
    Why was Leibniz so fascinated by Chinese philosophy and culture? What specific forms did his interest take? How did his interest compare with the relative indifference of his philosophical contemporaries and near-contemporaries such as Spinoza and Locke? In this highly original book, Franklin Perkins examines Leibniz's voluminous writings on the subject and suggests that his interest was founded in his own philosophy: the nature of his metaphysical and theological views required him to take Chinese thought seriously. Leibniz was unusual (...)
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  28. Franklin Perkins (2003). Companion Encyclopedia of Asian Philosophy. Teaching Philosophy 26 (1):118-120.
  29. Franklin Perkins (2002). Virtue, Reason, and Cultural Exchange: Leibniz's Praise of Chinese Morality. Journal of the History of Ideas 63 (3):447-464.
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  30. Franklin Perkins (2002). Mencius, Emotion, and Autonomy. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 29 (2):207–226.
  31. Franklin Perkins (2002). Readings in Classical Chinese Philosophy. Teaching Philosophy 25 (3):269-272.
  32. Franklin Perkins (1999). Ideas and Self-Reflection in Leibniz. The Leibniz Review 9:43-63.
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