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  1. Fred L. Bookstein (2014). Statistics is Founded on Entropy, Not Evolutionary Psychology. Biological Theory 9 (1):108-112.
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  2. Fred L. Bookstein (2014). “The Map is Not the Territory”. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 37 (1):78-79.
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  3. Fred L. Bookstein (2013). Allometry for the Twenty-First Century. Biological Theory 7 (1):10-25.
    The current literature that attempts to bridge between geometric morphometrics (GMM) and finite element analyses (FEA) of CT-derived data from bones of living animals and fossils appears to lack a sound biotheoretical foundation. To supply the missing rigor, the present article demonstrates a new rhetoric of quantitative inference across the GMM–FEA bridge—a rhetoric bridging form to function when both have been quantified so stringently. The suggested approach is founded on diverse standard textbook examples of the relation between forms and the (...)
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  4. Martin Fieder, Susanne Huber & Fred L. Bookstein (2011). Socioeconomic Status, Marital Status and Childlessness in Men and Women: An Analysis of Census Data From Six Countries. Journal of Biosocial Science 43 (5):619-635.
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  5. Heather A. Jamniczky, Julia C. Boughner, Campbell Rolian, Paula N. Gonzalez, Christopher D. Powell, Eric J. Schmidt, Trish E. Parsons, Fred L. Bookstein & Benedikt Hallgrímsson (2010). Rediscovering Waddington in the Post‐Genomic Age. Bioessays 32 (7):553-558.
  6. Fred L. Bookstein (2009). How Quantification Persuades When It Persuades. Biological Theory 4 (2):132-147.
    Although Harry Woolf’s great collective volume Quantification mostly overlooked biology, Thomas Kuhn’s chapter there on the role of quantitative measurement within the physical sciences maps quite well onto the forms of reasoning that actually persuade us as biologists 50 years later. Kuhn distinguished between two contexts, that of producing quantitative anomalies and that of resolving them. The implied form of reasoning is actually C. S. Peirce’s abduction or inference to the best explanation: “The surprising fact C is observed; but if (...)
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  7. Fred L. Bookstein (2009). Measurement, Explanation, and Biology: Lessons From a Long Century. Biological Theory 4 (1):6-20.
    It is far from obvious that outside of highly specialized domains such as commercial agriculture, the methodology of biometrics—quantitative comparisons over groups of organisms—should be of any use in today’s bioinformatically informed biological sciences. The methods in our biometric textbooks, such as regressions and principal components analysis, make assumptions of homogeneity that are incompatible with current understandings of the origins of developmental or evolutionary data in historically contingent processes, processes that might have come out otherwise; the appropriate statistical methods are (...)
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  8. Fred L. Bookstein (2009). Was There Information in My Data? Really?Model Based Inference in the Life Sciences: A Primer on EvidenceDavid R. Anderson New York: Springer, 2008 (Xxiv+184 Pp.; $39.95 Pbk; ISBN 978-0-387-74073-7). [REVIEW] Biological Theory 4 (3):302-308.
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  9. Katrin Schaefer, Philipp Mitteroecker, Bernhard Fink & Fred L. Bookstein (2009). Psychomorphospace—From Biology to Perception, and Back: Towards an Integrated Quantification of Facial Form Variation. Biological Theory 4 (1):98-106.
    Several disciplines share an interest in the evolutionary selection pressures that shaped human physical functioning and appearance, psyche, and behavior. The methodologies invoked from the disciplines studying these domains are often based on different rhetorics, and hence may conflict. Progress in one field is thereby hampered from effective transfer to others. Topics at the intersection of anthropometry and psychometry, such as the impact of sexual selection on the hominin face, are a typical example. Since the underlying theory explicitly places facial (...)
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  10. Fred L. Bookstein (2006). Commentary: Please Acknowledge That Biology Is Not an Exact Science. Biological Theory 1 (4):335-337.
  11. Fred L. Bookstein (2006). My Unexpected Journey in Applied Biomathematics. Biological Theory 1 (1):67-77.
    Fetal alcohol syndrome , the most common avoidable human birth defect, is the extensive irreversible brain damage caused by heavy prenatal alcohol exposure. Following the discovery of FAS in 1973, a multidisciplinary research community began applying discipline-specific methods to investigate the mechanisms underlying FAS and its consequences for the victims’ cognition and social behavior. An academic biomathematician and statistician, since 1984 I have collaborated with one American research group studying this condition.
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  12. Fred L. Bookstein (2000). From Reductionism to Reductionism. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (4):534-534.
    Neural organization attempts to thwart, at least in part, modern neuroscientists' tendency to focus reductionistically on ever smaller microsystems. But although emphasizing higher levels of systems organization, the authors end up enforcing reductionisms of their own, principally the reduction of their domain to the study of invariable normal functioning, without explicit modeling of the deviations that constitute disease states or aging. This reductionism seriously weakens the authors' claims about the truth of their quantitative models.
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  13. Fred L. Bookstein (1998). Statistical Significance Testing Was Not Meant for Weak Corroborations of Weaker Theories. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (2):195-196.
    Chow sets his version of statistical significance testing in an impoverished context of “theory corroboration” that explicitly excludes well-posed theories admitting of strong support by precise empirical evidence. He demonstrates no scientific usefulness for the problematic procedure he recommends instead. The important role played by significance testing in today's behavioral and brain sciences is wholly inconsistent with the rhetoric he would enforce.
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  14. Fred L. Bookstein (1993). Converting Cultural Success Into Mating Failure by Aging. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (2):285.
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  15. Fred L. Bookstein (1992). Error Analysis, Regression and Coordinate Systems. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 15 (2):327-329.
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  16. Fred L. Bookstein (1991). Heritability of What? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (3):387-388.
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  17. Fred L. Bookstein (1991). Optimality as a Mathematical Rhetoric for Zeroes. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (2):216-217.
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  18. Fred L. Bookstein (1990). An Interaction Effect is Not a Measurement. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (1):121-122.
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