Search results for 'Frederic D. Portray' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Joel B. Hagen (1999). Retelling Experiments: H.B.D. Kettlewell's Studies of Industrial Melanism in Peppered Moths. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 14 (1):39-54.score: 54.0
    H. B. D. Kettlewell's field experiments on industrial melanism in the peppered moth, Biston betularia, have become the best known demonstration of natural selection in <span class='Hi'>action</span>. I argue that textbook accounts routinely portray this research as an example of controlled experimentation, even though this is historically misleading. I examine how idealized accounts of Kettlewell's research have been used by professional biologists and biology teachers. I also respond to some criticisms of David Rudge to my earlier discussions of this (...)
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  2. M. R. Wicclair (2008). Medical Paternalism in House M.D. Medical Humanities 34 (2):93-99.score: 54.0
    The popular television series House M.D. is drawn upon to provide a critical examination of medical paternalism and how it is presented in the show. Dr Gregory House, the character named in the title of the series, is a paradigm of a paternalistic physician. He believes that he knows what is best for his patients, and he repeatedly disregards their wishes in order to diagnose and treat their illnesses. This paper examines several examples of medical paternalism and the means used (...)
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  3. W. R. Halliday (1924). Roman Politics and Greek Civilisation Roman Politics: Our Debt to Greece and Rome. By Frank Frost Abbott. 7½″ × 5″. Pp. Vi + 177. London, Calcutta, Sydney: Harrap and Co. 5s. Greek Life and Thought: A Portrayal of Greek Civilisation. By La Rue van Hook, Ph.D. 9″ × 5½″. Pp. Xiv + 329, 46 Illustrations. New York: Columbia University Press, 1923. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 38 (1-2):36-37.score: 40.0
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  4. A. L. Udovitch (1986). S. D. Goitein, A Mediterranean Society: The Jewish Communities of the Arab World as Portrayed in the Documents of the Cairo Geniza, 4: Daily Life. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1983. Pp. Xxvi, 492; Frontispiece Map. $38.50. [REVIEW] Speculum 61 (3):656-659.score: 40.0
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  5. Graham Harman (2011). The Road to Objects. Continent 3 (1):171-179.score: 24.0
    continent. 1.3 (2011): 171-179. Since 2007 there has been a great deal of interest in speculative realism, launched in the spring of that year at a well-attended workshop in London. It was always a loose arrangement of people who shared few explicit doctrines and no intellectual heroes except the horror writer H.P. Lovecraft, an improbable patron saint for a school of metaphysics. Lovecraft serves as a sort of mascot for the “speculative” part of speculative realism, since his grotesque semi-Euclidean monsters (...)
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  6. Sean Sayers, The `Uplifting Influence' of Work and Industry.score: 24.0
    Le pas d'acier was conceived in 1925 at the height of enthusiasm for the Russian Revolution both in Russia and abroad. Prokofiev intended the ballet to `show the new life that had come to the Soviet Union, and primarily the construction effort.' He quotes Yakulov as saying that the ballet would portray `the uplifting influence of organised labour.' (Prokofiev 1991, 278). In its theme and its staging it is a celebration of industry and labour.
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  7. Phyllis Granoff (1989). Jain Lives of Haribhadra: An Inquiry Into the Sources and Logic of the Legends. [REVIEW] Journal of Indian Philosophy 17 (2):105-128.score: 24.0
    I have attempted here to trace the development of Haribhadra's biography. My contention throughout has been that there is a basic incongruity between what one can discern from the actual works about the author Haribhadra and the legends that came to be associated with him. I have argued that the legends initially came from elsewhere in part from the legends of the arrogant monk who challenges the schismatic Rohagutta, and in part from the stories told of Akalanka, who probably was (...)
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  8. Jason Reblando (2014). Farm Security Administration Photographs of Greenbelt Towns: Selling Utopia During the Great Depression. Utopian Studies 25 (1):52-86.score: 24.0
    In this article I argue that the Farm Security Administration (FSA) photographs of the Greenbelt Town program in the late 1930s function beyond the goals for which the FSA photographs are typically known.1 The FSA photographs documented scenes of urban and rural poverty during the Great Depression to make the case for supporting President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s New Deal policies. In the midst of the Great Depression, the U.S. government planned and built three Greenbelt towns with a utopian vision of (...)
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  9. David Wÿss Rudge (2006). H.B.D. Kettlewell's Research 1937-1953: The Influence of E.B. Ford, E.A. Cockayne and P.M. Sheppard. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 28 (3):359 - 387.score: 18.0
    H.B.D. Kettlewell is best known for his pioneering work on the phenomenon of industrial melanism, which began shortly after his appointment in 1951 as a Nuffield Foundation research worker in E.B. Ford's newly formed sub-department of genetics at the University of Oxford. In the years since, a legend has formed around these investigations, one that portrays them as a success story of the 'Oxford School of Ecological Genetics', emphasizes Ford's intellectual contribution, and minimizes reference to assistance provided by others. The (...)
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  10. David R. Hannah & Christopher D. Zatzick (2008). An Examination of Leader Portrayals in the U.S. Business Press Following the Landmark Scandals of the Early 21st Century. Journal of Business Ethics 79 (4):361 - 377.score: 14.0
    Following the landmark corporate scandals of the early 21st century, there appeared to be a tremendous increase in the U.S. business media’s emphasis on issues of ethics in corporate leadership. The purpose of this research was to examine whether that apparent increase was reflected in an actual change in that media’s portrayals of successful leaders. We content analyzed the text of a total of 180 articles in Business Week, Fortune, and Forbes magazine, 90 from the five years preceding the landmark (...)
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  11. Frederic Gilbert & Ovadia Daniela (2011). Deep Brain Stimulation in the Media: Over-Optimistic Media Portrayals Calls for a New Strategy Involving Journalists and Scientifics in the Ethical Debate. Journal of Integrative in Neuroscience 5 (16).score: 14.0
    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is optimistically portrayed in contemporary media. This already happened with psychosurgery during the first half of the twentieth century. The tendency of popular media to hype the benefits of DBS therapies, without equally highlighting risks, fosters public expectations also due to the lack of ethical analysis in the scientific literature. Media are not expected (and often not prepared) to raise the ethical issues which remain unaddressed by the scientific community. To obtain a more objective portrayal of (...)
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  12. Sabrina D. Misirhiralall (2013). Dance as Portrayed in the Media. Journal of Aesthetic Education 47 (3):72-95.score: 12.0
    In a Missouri school district during the late 1980s, parents and students argued that “the policy, reflecting the Christian fundamentalist view that social dance is sinful, violated the constitutionality required by separation of church and state.”1 The school board in Purdy, Missouri, advocated for a policy that banned school dances. In 1986, fundamentalist Christians, a majority of the town residents, wanted to maintain the century-old ban against school dances when some school board members discussed a modification of the policy. As (...)
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  13. Michael D. Barber (2007). The First-Person: Participation in Argument and the Intentional Relationship. Southern Journal of Philosophy 45 (S1):22-27.score: 12.0
    This paper supports Charles Siewert’s criticism of those criticizing first-person approaches because they disagree by arguing that such critics adopt a noncommittal, third-person observer standpoint on the debates themselves before recommending only third-person natural scientific approaches to mind and that they oversimplify when they portray philosophy as contentious and natural science as ruled by consensus. Further, a complete account of first-person intentionality in terms of acts and their correlative objects in their temporal and bodily interrelationships make it possible to (...)
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  14. D. T. Ridley (1999). Jehovah's Witnesses' Refusal of Blood: Obedience to Scripture and Religious Conscience. Journal of Medical Ethics 25 (6):469-472.score: 12.0
    Jehovah's Witnesses are students of the Bible. They refuse transfusions out of obedience to the scriptural directive to abstain and keep from blood. Dr Muramoto disagrees with the Witnesses' religious beliefs in this regard. Despite this basic disagreement over the meaning of Biblical texts, Muramoto flouts the religious basis for the Witnesses' position. His proposed policy change about accepting transfusions in private not only conflicts with the Witnesses' fundamental beliefs but it promotes hypocrisy. In addition, Muramoto's arguments about pressure to (...)
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  15. D. Gene Witmer (2004). Christopher S. Hill, Thought and World: An Austere Portrayal of Truth, Reference, and Semantic Correspondence. Philosophical Inquiry 26 (4):142-145.score: 12.0
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  16. Sylvie Avakian (forthcoming). 'Undecidability' or 'Anticipatory Resoluteness' Caputo in Conversation with Heidegger. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-17.score: 12.0
    In this article I will consider John D. Caputo’s ‘radical hermeneutics’, with ‘undecidability’ as its major theme, in conversation with Martin Heidegger’s notion of ‘anticipatory resoluteness’. Through an examination of the positions of Caputo and Heidegger I argue that Heidegger’s notion of ‘anticipatory resoluteness’ reaches far beyond the claims of ‘radical hermeneutics’, and that it assumes a reconstructive process which carries within its scope the overtones of deconstruction, the experience of repetition and authenticity and also the implications of Gelassenheit. Further, (...)
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  17. Wayne D. Bowman (1998). Philosophical Perspectives on Music. Oxford University Press.score: 12.0
    Designed to introduce music students and musicians to the vitality of music philosophical discourse, Philosophical Perspectives on Music explores diverse accounts of the nature and value of music. It offers an accessible, even-handed consideration of philosophical orientations without advocating any single one, demonstrating that there are a number of ways in which music may reasonably be understood. This unique approach examines the strengths and advantages of each perspective as well as its inevitable shortcomings. From the pre-Socratic Greeks to idealism, through (...)
     
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  18. D. Futter (2009). The Concept of Persuasion in Plato's Early and Middle Dialogues. South African Journal of Philosophy 28 (2).score: 12.0
    Plato’s early dialogues represent the failure of Socrates’ philosophical programme. They depict Socrates as someone whose mission requires that he make an intellectual and moral impact on those with whom he converses; and they portray him as almost never bringing about this result. One central problem, dramatised throughout the early dialogues, is that perceptual moral intuitions undermine the possibility of reason’s making significant changes to a person’s moral belief system. I argue that Republic presents a theory of education which (...)
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  19. Doug Thompson (2013). Montaigne's Political Education: Raison d'Etat in the Essais. History of Political Thought 34 (2):195-224.score: 12.0
    Montaigne is generally portrayed either as a principal proponent of the mix of scepticism, neo-Stoicism and Tacitism that feeds the early-modern reason-of-state literature or as a thoroughgoing political moralist who rejects this literature's politics of necessity and princely deception in favour of a politics of classical or Christian virtue. I argue that Montaigne inhabits neither of these positions exclusively. Instead, he argues in utramque partem, both for and against reason of state, in order to educate > his readers about the (...)
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  20. Antonio Vacca (2009). Lineamenti di un sistema di filosofia trascendentale d'ispirazione boliviana. Cultura 6 (2):185-209.score: 12.0
    This essay is a coherent and consistent system of transcendental philosophy, which portrays a reality, hidden by the veils of the exterior appearance, unknowable in the inner fundamental nature, lack of any meaning, where evil and good, moral and immoral are empty words without any possible content, hollow shells. A reality where the necessity rules everything, where the man is in the same level of any other manifestation of the Being and where the human freedom is only an illusion of (...)
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  21. David Bakhurst (2005). Il'enkov on Education. Studies in East European Thought 57 (3-4):261 - 275.score: 8.0
    The philosophy of education is among the least celebrated sub-disciplines of Anglo-American philosophy. Its neglect is hard to reconcile, however, with the fact that human beings owe their distinctive psychological powers to cumulative cultural evolution, the process in which each generation inherits the collective cognitive achievements of previous generations through cultural, rather than biological, transmission. This paper examines the work of Eval’d Il’enkov, who, unlike his Anglo-American counterparts, maintains that education, broadly understood, is central to issues in epistemology and philosophy (...)
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  22. M. J. Czarny, R. R. Faden & J. Sugarman (2010). Bioethics and Professionalism in Popular Television Medical Dramas. Journal of Medical Ethics 36 (4):203-206.score: 8.0
    Television medical dramas sometimes depict medical professionalism and bioethical issues, but their nature and extent are unclear. The authors systematically analysed the bioethical and professionalism content of one season each of Grey's Anatomy and House M.D., two of the most popular current television medical dramas. The results indicate that these programmes are rife with powerful portrayals of bioethical issues and egregious deviations from the norms of professionalism and contain exemplary depictions of professionalism to a much lesser degree.
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  23. Pierre Rodrigo (2010). L'écart Du Sens (French). Chiasmi International 12:71-82.score: 8.0
    The Hiatus of Sense. Framing and Cinematic Montage according to Eisenstein and Merleau-Ponty“Cinema portrays movement, but how? Is it, as we are inclined to believe, by copying more closely the changes of place? We may presume not, since slow motion shows a body floating between objects like seaweed, but not moving itself.” This interrogation constitutes the only allusion to the cinema in Eye and Mind, and, by reading the argumentation developed in this work, one cannot help thinking that the role (...)
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  24. Daniel Andrews, The Second Revolution.score: 8.0
    Liberties are taken in portraying the US public as class-conscious and informed. Otherwise, this story would not be about a revolution ... it would be about a fascist takeover. The chances of fighting off fascism are very slim unless the public at large is provided with an accessible alternative to the news and history which they are offered by the mass media, by the schools, by the government and by their employers. These reports are not a hoax, but a piece (...)
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  25. Alexandra Cook, The 'Septie`Me Promenade' of the Reˆveries: A Peculiar Account of Rousseau's Botany?score: 8.0
    IN an article on Rousseau’s annotations of a popular botany text, Henry Cheyron describes the Genevan philosopher as ‘ce botaniste me´juge´’. 3 The misapprehension of Rousseau’s botanical practice identified by Cheyron has its roots, I believe, in Rousseau’s own depiction of his botanising in the Reˆveries; in the ‘Septie`me promenade’ Rousseau selfconsciously portrays this study as socially isolated, lazy and lacking in direction: ‘La botanique est l’e´tude d’un oisif et paresseux solitaire... Il se prome`ne, il erre librement d’un objet a` (...)
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  26. Olivier Lagueux (2003). Geoffroy's Giraffe: The Hagiography of a Charismatic Mammal. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 36 (2):225 - 247.score: 8.0
    In 1826, the Pasha of Egypt offered to the King Charles X an unusual present: a living giraffe. While offering remarkable animals was a common practice among monarchs, the choice of a giraffe was somewhat extraordinary since it was the first representative of its kind to set foot in France. The Royal Menagerie of the Paris Muséum national d'histoire naturelle was asked to oversee the transportation of this precious mammal and Étienne Geoffroy Saint-Hilaire, one of its professors, was sent to (...)
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  27. Ros Murray (2013). 'The Epidermis of Reality': Artaud, the Material Body and Dreyer's The Passion of Joan of Arc. Film-Philosophy 17 (1):445-461.score: 8.0
    This article examines Artaud's 1920s cinema texts, arguing that like other theorists writing at the time, Artaud envisaged the medium of cinema as capable of forging new types of corporeal experience, both through the types of bodies that were portrayed onscreen, and their relationship to the body of the audience, conceived as collective force rather than an individual spectator. It pays particular attention to Artaud's theories of corporeal materiality, and argues that these are relevant to more recent approaches to embodiment (...)
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  28. Henry Harris (ed.) (1995). Identity: Essays Based on Herbert Spencer Lectures Given in the University of Oxford. Clarendon Press.score: 8.0
    Who am I, and what am I? The question is one asked through the ages, answered in various ways in different disciplines. Identity is a matter of intellectual interest but also of personal and practical interest, attracting attention and stimulating controversy outside the ranks of the specialists. This volume offers a comparison and cross-fertilization of insights and theories from various disciplines in which identity is a key concept. -/- Identity contains essays by six internationally famous contributors, focusing on different facets (...)
     
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  29. Arthur Kleinman (2008). What Really Matters: Living a Moral Life Amidst Uncertainty and Danger. OUP USA.score: 8.0
    In this moving and thought-provoking volume, Arthur Kleinman tells the unsettling stories of a handful of men and women, some of whom have lived through some of the most fundamental transitions of the turbulent twentieth century. Here we meet an American veteran of World War II, tortured by the memory of the atrocities he committed while a soldier in the Pacific. A French-American woman aiding refugees in sub-Saharan Africa, facing the utter chaos of a society where life has become meaningless. (...)
     
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  30. D. E. Berlyne & Lorraine F. Normore (1972). Effects of Prior Uncertainty on Incidental Free Recall. Journal of Experimental Psychology 96 (1):43.score: 6.0
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  31. Graham Harman (2010). I Am Also of the Opinion That Materialism Must Be Destroyed. Environment and Planning D 28 (5):1-17.score: 4.0
    This paper criticizes two forms of philosophical materialism that adopt opposite strategies but end up in the same place. Both hold that individual entities must be banished from philosophy. The first kind is ground floor materialism, which attempts to dissolve all objects into some deeper underlying basis; here, objects are seen as too shallow to be the truth. The second kind is first floor materialism, which treats objects as naive fictions gullibly posited behind the direct accessibility of appearances or relations; (...)
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  32. Heidi Maibom & James Harold (2010). Without Taste: Psychopaths and the Appreciation of Art. la Nouvelle Revue Française d'Esthétique 6:151-63.score: 4.0
    Psychopaths are the bugbears of moral philosophy. They are often used as examples of perfectly rational people who are nonetheless willing to do great moral wrong without regret; hence the disorder has received the epithet “moral insanity” (Pritchard 1835). But whereas philosophers have had a great deal to say about psychopaths’ glaring and often horrifying lack of moral conscience, their aesthetic capacities have received hardly any attention, and are generally assumed to be intact or even enhanced. Popular culture often portrays (...)
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  33. D. S. Duckworth (2010). Mipam's Middle Way Through Yogācāra and Prāsaṅgika. Journal of Indian Philosophy 38 (4):431-439.score: 4.0
    In Tibet, the negative dialectics of Madhyamaka are typically identified with Candrakīrti’s interpretation of Nāgārjuna, and systematic epistemology is associated with Dharmakīrti. These two figures are also held to be authoritative commentators on a univocal doctrine of Buddhism. Despite Candrakīrti’s explicit criticism of Buddhist epistemologists in his Prasannapadā, Buddhists in Tibet have integrated the theories of Candrakīrti and Dharmakīrti in unique ways. Within this integration, there is a tension between the epistemological system-building on the one hand, and “deconstructive” negative dialectics (...)
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  34. Charles D. Tarlton (2004). Reason and History in Locke's Second Treatise. Philosophy 79 (2):247-279.score: 4.0
    The idea of an original contract is, ironically, inherently narrative in form; although tautological in essence, it nevertheless portrays events occurring in sequence. In response to Filmer's provocations that the idea of an original contract lacks historical veracity, Locke tries and repeatedly fails to establish a direct historical substantiation of his position in the early chapters of the Second Treatise. The most important of these various miscalculations concern the role of consent in his account of the origins of government, the (...)
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  35. D. N. Sedley (2004). The Midwife of Platonism: Text and Subtext in Plato's Theaetetus. Oxford University Press.score: 4.0
    Plato's Theaetetus is an acknowledged masterpiece, and among the most influential texts in the history of epistemology. Since antiquity it has been debated whether this dialogue was written by Plato to support his familiar metaphysical doctrines, or represents a self-distancing from these. David Sedley's book offers a via media, founded on a radical separation of the author, Plato, from his main speaker, Socrates. The dialogue, it is argued, is addressed to readers familiar with Plato's mature doctrines, and sets out to (...)
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  36. Mark D. Sullivan (2002). The Meaning of Facial Expressions of Pain Lies in Their Use, Not in Their Reference. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (4):472-473.score: 4.0
    As a product of natural selection, pain behavior must serve an adaptive function for the species beyond the accurate portrayal of the pain experience. Pain behavior does not simply refer to the pain experience, but promotes survival of the species in various and complex ways. This means that there is no purely respondent or operant pain behavior found in nature.
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  37. Thomas C. Brickhouse & Nicholas D. Smith (1996). Plato's Socrates. OUP USA.score: 4.0
    Socrates, as he is portrayed in Plato's early dialogues, remains one of the most controversial figures in the history of philosophy. This book concerns six of the most vexing and often discussed features of Plato's portrayal: Socrates' methodology, epistemology, psychology, ethics, politics, and religion. Brickhouse and Smith cast new light on Plato's early dialogues by providing novel analyses of many of the doctrines and practices for which Socrates is best known. Included are discussions of Socrates' moral method, his profession of (...)
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  38. D. Micah Hester (2003). Is Pragmatism Well-Suited to Bioethics? Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 28 (5 & 6):545 – 561.score: 4.0
    This paper attempts to defend pragmatic approaches to bioethics against detractors, showing how particular critics have failed or succeeded. The paper divides bioethics from a pragmatic point of view into three groups. The first group is called "bioethical pragmatism" that will be represented by two book-chapters from the anthology, Pragmatic Bioethics . The second group is called "clinical pragmatism" championed by Fins, Baccetta, and Miller. Finally, a third group, which has roots in the legal tradition, has been called "freestanding pragmatism" (...)
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  39. O. Scott Stovall, John D. Neill & David Perkins (2004). Corporate Governance, Internal Decision Making, and the Invisible Hand. Journal of Business Ethics 51 (2):221-227.score: 4.0
    Proponents of the dominant contemporary model of corporate governance maintain that the shareholder is the primary constituent of the firm. The responsibility for managerial decision makers in this governance system is to maximize shareholder wealth. Neoclassical economists ethically justify this objective with their interpretation of Adam Smith's notion of the Invisible Hand. Using a famous quotation from The Wealth of Nations, they interpret the Invisible Hand as Smith's (An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations, Methuen (...)
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  40. D. Breschi (2012). Fascism, Liberalism and Revolution. European Journal of Political Theory 11 (4):410-425.score: 4.0
    Marxist theory has always maintained that a strict continuity exists between liberalism and fascism, and has even proclaimed that there is a causal connection between the two. Therefore fascism comes to be portrayed as the ‘armed wing’ of the bourgeoisie. The Marxist thesis is weak for two reasons: first, because the connection between liberalism and fascism, though it doubtless exists, is considerably more complex, mediated and contradictory than it suggests; and second, because it axiomatically denies the revolutionary nature of fascism, (...)
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  41. Steven D. Aguzzi (2010). John Henry Newman's Anglican Views on Judaism. Newman Studies Journal 7 (1):56-72.score: 4.0
    The scant scholarship associated with Newman’s Anglican views about Judaism has focused on his negative rhetoric against Judaism and portrayed him as anti-Semitic. His Anglican writings, however, applied terms associated with Judaism in a typological sense to the political and religious realities of his day, primarily to support his apologetic agenda and to highlight threats to the Church of England. Simultaneously, he stressed the positive characteristics of Judaism, illustrated the continuity between Judaism and Christianity, and pointed out that the religious (...)
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  42. Jennifer Jordan, Daniel A. Diermeier & Adam D. Galinsky (2012). The Strategic Samaritan. Business Ethics Quarterly 22 (4):621-648.score: 4.0
    This research examines how two dimensions of moral intensity involved in a corporation’s external crisis response—magnitude of effectiveness and interpersonal proximity—influence observer perceptions of and behavioral intentions toward the corporation. Across three studies, effectiveness decreased negative perceptions and increased pro-organizational intentions via ethical judgment of the response. Moreover, the two dimensions interacted such that a response high in proximity but low in effectiveness led to more negative perceptions and to less pro-organizational intentions. This interaction was particularly pronounced if the corporation (...)
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  43. B. M. Stafford, J. L. Puma & D. L. Schiedermayer (1989). One Face of Beauty, One Picture of Health: The Hidden Aesthetic of Medical Practice. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 14 (2):213-230.score: 4.0
    Unrecognized presuppositions about patient appearance have become increasingly important in medicine, medical ethics and medical law. Symptoms of these historically conditioned assumptions include common ageism, aesthetic surgery, and litigation about ‘wrongful life’. These phenomena suggest a societal intolerance for what is considered an ‘abnormal’ appearance. Among others, eighteenth-century artists and anatomists helped to set these twentieth-century precedents, actually measuring deviations of external traits to analogous deformations of the soul, and drawing moral conclusions from physiognomic measurements. Other eighteenth-century artists countered with (...)
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  44. D. M. Gore (2001). Clinical Craft: A Lesson From Liverpool. Medical Humanities 27 (2):74-75.score: 4.0
    Inspiration in medical humanities can be intense and personal, and does not necessarily require the portrayal of health issues.
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  45. Emrys D. Jones (2011). Royal Ruptures: Caroline of Ansbach and the Politics of Illness in the 1730s. Medical Humanities 37 (1):13-17.score: 4.0
    Caroline of Ansbach, wife of George II, occupied a crucial position in the public life of early 18th-century Britain. She was seen to exert considerable influence on the politics of the court and, as mother to the Hanoverian dynasty's next generation, she became an important emblem for the nation's political well-being. This paper examines how such emblematic significance was challenged and qualified when Caroline's body could no longer be portrayed as healthy and life giving. Using private memoirs and correspondence from (...)
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  46. Cindy D. Kam (2012). The Psychological Veracity of Zaller's Model. Critical Review 24 (4):545-567.score: 4.0
    Zaller's model of public-opinion formation portrays the average citizen as an automaton who responds unthinkingly to elite cues. That is, once people have received information from political elites, they tend to abide by whatever their respective cue-givers dictate, since rejecting information is more cognitively costly than simply accepting it. Empirical research in psychology on priming supports this view of the citizen as a passive receiver of information. For example, people are likely to be unconsciously influenced by subtle cues and they (...)
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  47. D. Lanzerath, Ludger Honnefelder & Ulrich Feeser (1998). Nationaler Bericht der Europäischen Befragung: „Doctors' Views on the Management of Patients in Persistent Vegetative State (PVS)“ Im Rahmen des Forschungsprojekts „The Moral and Legal Issues Surrounding the Treatment and Health Care of Patients in Persistent Vegetative State“. [REVIEW] Ethik in der Medizin 10 (3):152-180.score: 4.0
    Definition of the problem: The report supplies the national part of a European survey in which doctors that are involved in the treatment of patients in `Persistent Vegetative State' (PVS) are being interviewed. The questions concern decision-situations the doctors are frequently confronted with in the treatment of PVS-patients. The questionnaire is designed as a decisiontree in order to bring about the exact delineations that govern the decisions. Therefore the result of the survey only portrays which delineations are in fact being (...)
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  48. D. Jabbari (1990). The Role of Law in Reproductive Medicine: A New Approach. Journal of Medical Ethics 16 (1):35-40.score: 4.0
    It is a common feature of debates on the regulation of reproductive medicine to find law portrayed as a crude form of intervention consisting in the imposition of inflexible rules on doctors and medical researchers. This paper argues that this view must be replaced by a more accurate assessment of the law's potential role in the regulation of reproductive medicine. From an analysis of the White Paper on human fertilisation and embryology, and in particular the proposed Statutory Licensing Authority, the (...)
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