Search results for 'Frederic Will Jr' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Will Frederic (2009). Language, Time, and Die Tat: What Do I Remember When I Remember That My Wife Said to Get Milk on the Way Home? Cultura. International Journal of Philosophy of Culture and Axiology 6 (1).score: 280.0
     
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  2. Frederic Will (1956). Two Critics of the Elgin Marbles: William Hazlitt and Quatremère de Quincy. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 14 (4):462-474.score: 240.0
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  3. Frederic Will (1995). Book Review: Literature as Sheltering the Human. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Literature 19 (2).score: 240.0
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  4. Frederic Will (1981). The Use of Language and its Objects in Literature and Society. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 41 (4):556-560.score: 240.0
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  5. Frederic Will (2012). Cultural Illusions. Cultura 9 (1):123-134.score: 240.0
    Being part of a culture seems, on the face of it, empirically describable, and verifiable. But in fact that kind of participation is not so easy to characterize. Our existence as members of a culture is given to us fleetingly, and in awarenesses tightly locked to the awareness of the other, who is not our culture. Being part of aculture therefore is part of knowing yourself as limited. But to what are you limited? You are limited to being a presence (...)
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  6. Frederic Will (1956). Goethes Aesthetics: The Work of Art and the Work of Nature. Philosophical Quarterly 6 (22):53-65.score: 240.0
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  7. Frederic Will (1977). Belphagor: Six Essays in Imaginative Space. Rodopi.score: 240.0
    Roger Garaudy, the Hellenic tradition, and imaginative space.--Kazantzakis' making of God.--Existentialism and language.--The argument of water.--Literature as ikonic language.--Literature and morality.
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  8. Frederic Will (2011). Ontology and the Products of Spirit: A Classroom Conversation. Journal of Aesthetic Education 45 (4):67-78.score: 240.0
    Among the casualties of the rush to relativism is a central tenet of classical thought: that great works of literature are great in and of themselves and not because of the needs and values of their time. This “canon-based view,” supply taken for granted by Johnson, Arnold, Pope, and Eliot, has long since been shown the door by views ranging from Marxism to today’s cultural studies. These views hold that the great works become great because of the values and concerns (...)
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  9. Frederic Will (1958). The Knowing of Greek Tragedy. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 16 (4):510-518.score: 240.0
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  10. Frederic Will (1960). Aristotle and the Question of Character in Literature. Review of Metaphysics 14 (2):353 - 359.score: 240.0
  11. Frederic Will (1960). Aristotle and the Source of the Art-Work. Phronesis 5 (2):152-168.score: 240.0
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  12. Frederic Will (2012). Being Here: Sociology as Poetry, Self-Construction, and Our Time as Language. Mellen Poetry Press.score: 240.0
     
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  13. Frederic Will (1957). Blake's Quarrel with Reynolds. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 15 (3):340-349.score: 240.0
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  14. Frederic Will (forthcoming). Can We Get Inside the Aesthetic Sensibility of the Archaic Past? Contemporary Aesthetics.score: 240.0
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  15. Frederic Will (2010). Directionalities. Cultura 7 (1):227-240.score: 240.0
    The essay hypothesizes a norm condition of stasis—the mood of sentient peace occupied on a quiet porch. From there the psyche is drawn upward by concept, into the benign/abstract world or downward into the pre-verbal which links us with prespeech man/woman. Is there any default position in this map of the positions of consciousness?
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  16. Frederic Will (1965). Flumen Historicum: Victor Cousin's Aesthetic and its Sources. Chapel Hill, University of North Carolina Press.score: 240.0
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  17. Frederic Will (2009). Language, Time, and Die Tat. Cultura 6 (1):156-168.score: 240.0
    "Die Tat" concerns the effort to recapture a particular memory. In searching to recover that memory trace the writer discovers that the memory datum itself diffuses and breaks up into the present remembering action of the one who remembers. The essay anatomizes that process of diffusion, and tries to come up with a definition of memory.
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  18. Frederic Will (2009). Saving Time and Paying for the World. Cultura 6 (2):108-117.score: 240.0
    This essay illustrates senses in which linear time can be proven to be non existent. Yet, as the essay agrees, the practical use of linear time, as an organizational principle in life, is unquestionable. Do we live a lie by relying on the non existent to undergird our lives? Or is lie a misleading, and naïve, word for our solution to this state of affairs?
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  19. Frederic Will (2009). Temporal Foundations in the Construction of History: Two Essays. Cosmos and History: The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 5 (2):161-177.score: 240.0
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  20. Frederic Will (1973). The Fact of Literature. Amsterdam,Rodopi.score: 240.0
     
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  21. Frederic Will (1988). Thresholds & Testimonies: Recovering Order in Literature and Criticism. Wayne State University Press.score: 240.0
     
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  22. Transforming Will (2010). Samoans Have a Word for “Will”—Loto—but Anthropologists Have Not Always Translated It Thusly, Which Puzzled Me When I First Began Doing Ethnography in American Sāmoa in the 1980s. I Was Taking a Language Class Kindly Offered to Stateside Teachers by a High-Ranking Member of the Government. He Decided to Teach Us a Love Song, Chanting the Language Into Our Heads. He Gave Us the Samoan Version and an English Translation with Every Word Glossed but One—Loto. After Class, I Asked Him to Translate It. He ... [REVIEW] In Keith M. Murphy & C. Jason Throop (eds.), Toward an Anthropology of the Will. Stanford University Press. 123.score: 150.0
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  23. Frederick L. Will (1947). Will the Future Be Like the Past? Mind 56 (224):332-347.score: 120.0
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  24. Bouchard Frédéric (2011). Darwinism Without Populations: A More Inclusive Understanding of the “Survival of the Fittest”. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 42 (1):106-114.score: 120.0
    Following Wallace’s suggestion, Darwin framed his theory using Spencer’s expression “survival of the fittest”. Since then, fitness occupies a significant place in the conventional understanding of Darwinism, even though the explicit meaning of the term ‘fitness’ is rarely stated. In this paper I examine some of the different roles that fitness has played in the development of the theory. Whereas the meaning of fitness was originally understood in ecological terms, it took a statistical turn in terms of reproductive success throughout (...)
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  25. Richard G. Heck Jr (2004). Truth and Disquotation. Synthese 142 (3):317 - 352.score: 120.0
    Hartry Field has suggested that we should adopt at least a methodological deflationism: "[W]e should assume full-fledged deflationism as a working hypothesis. That way, if full-fledged deflationism should turn out to be inadequate, we will at least have a clearer sense than we now have of just where it is that inflationist assumptions... are needed". I argue here that we do not need to be methodological deflationists. More precisely, I argue that we have no need for a disquotational truth-predicate; (...)
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  26. George F. Sowers Jr (2002). The Demise of the Doomsday Argument. Mind 111 (441):37 - 45.score: 120.0
    A refutation of the doomsday argument is offered. Through a simple thought experiment analysed in Bayesian terms the fallacy is shown to be the assumption that a currently living person represents a random sample from the population of all persons who will ever have existed. A more general version of the counter argument is then given. Previous arguments that purport to answer this concern are also addressed. One result is determining criteria for the applicability of time sampling arguments, i.e., (...)
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  27. John B. Cobb Jr (2008). Memory in a Whiteheadian Perspective. World Futures 64 (2):116 – 124.score: 120.0
    Whitehead does not provide us with a systematic account of the various types of experience to which the word “memory” is applied. Nevertheless, he does provide us with a way of understanding the world, and living creatures who inhabit it, that places the discussion in a different context from the usual one: the diverse features of human experience that we call memory are developed forms of basic patterns of relationship that characterize all actual entities. I will first review the (...)
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  28. Frederic Will Jr (1955). Cognition Through Beauty in Moses Mendelssohn's Early Aesthetics. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 14 (1):97-105.score: 87.0
  29. James Cain (2005). Fred Berthold, Jr God, Evil, and Human Learning: A Critique and Revision of the Free Will Defense in Theodicy. (Albany NY: State University of New York Press, 2004). Pp. VIII+108. $32.00 (Hbk). ISBN 0 7914 6041 X. [REVIEW] Religious Studies 41 (4):480-483.score: 72.0
  30. Brian Z. Tamanaha (2007). Review of Frederic R. Kellogg, Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr., Legal Theory, and Judicial Restraint. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2007 (4).score: 72.0
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  31. Hugh LaFollette (2006). William H. ("Will") Aiken, Jr., 1947-2006. Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 80 (2):105 - 106.score: 72.0
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  32. Jeffrey H. Burack (1997). Response to “Further Exploration of the Relationship Between Medical Education and Morel Development” by Donnie J. Self, DeWitt C. Baldwin, Jr., and Frederic D. Wolinsky (CQ Vol 5, No 3). [REVIEW] Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 6 (02):226-.score: 72.0
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  33. Jacob M. Held (2009). Frederic R. Kelllog, Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr., Legal Theory and Judicial Restraint Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 28 (1):33-35.score: 72.0
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  34. J. M. Held (2008). Frederic R. Kellogg, Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr., Legal Theory, and Judicial Restraint. Philosophy in Review 28 (1):33.score: 72.0
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  35. Eric Thomas Weber (2012). Review Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr., Legal Theory, and Judicial Restraint Kellogg Frederic R. Cambridge UP New York. The Pluralist 7 (3):136-139.score: 72.0
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  36. Thomas M. Osborne Jr (2014). Human Action in Thomas Aquinas, John Duns Scotus, and William of Ockham. The Catholic University of America Press.score: 42.0
    Thomas M. Osborne Jr. ... Vivarium 32 (1994): 62–71. te Velde, Rude A. “Natura in se ipsa recurva est: Duns Scotus and Aquinas on the Relationship between Nature and Will.” In John Duns Scotus: ... “William of Ockham's Theological Ethics .
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  37. Wanderley J. Ferreira Jr (2013). Heidegger Reader of Nietzsche: A Metaphysics of the Will Power as a Consummation of Western Metaphysics. Trans/Form/Ação 36 (1):101-116.score: 30.0
    Aspectos básicos da leitura heideggeriana de Nietzsche. As possibilidades e as possíveis distorções operadas por tal interpretação em alguns conceitos fundamentais do pensamento nietzschiano. Num primeiro momento, explicitam-se as duas atitudes de Heidegger diante da história da filosofia e de seus principais pensadores, em momentos diferentes de seu pensamento. Em seguida, analisa-se, com um certo distanciamento crítico, em que sentido, conforme Heidegger, ocorre a consumação da metafísica do sujeito pensante [Descartes] na metafísica da vontade de potência e na ideia de (...)
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  38. Frederic Schick (2003). Ambiguity and Logic. Cambridge University Press.score: 30.0
    In his book Frederic Schick develops his challenge to standard decision theory. He argues that talk of the beliefs and desires of an agent is not sufficient to explain choices. To account for a given choice we need to take into consideration how the agent understands the problem, how he sees in a selective way the options open to him. The author applies his new logic to a host of common human predicaments. Why do people in choice experiments act (...)
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  39. Antony Eagle (2005). Randomness Is Unpredictability. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 56 (4):749-790.score: 24.0
    The concept of randomness has been unjustly neglected in recent philosophical literature, and when philosophers have thought about it, they have usually acquiesced in views about the concept that are fundamentally flawed. After indicating the ways in which these accounts are flawed, I propose that randomness is to be understood as a special case of the epistemic concept of the unpredictability of a process. This proposal arguably captures the intuitive desiderata for the concept of randomness; at least it should suggest (...)
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  40. Cesare Cozzo (1994). What Can We Learn From the Paradox of Knowability? Topoi 13 (2):71--78.score: 24.0
    The intuitionistic conception of truth defended by Dummett, Martin Löf and Prawitz, according to which the notion of proof is conceptually prior1 to the notion of truth, is a particular version of the epistemic conception of truth. The paradox of knowability (first published by Frederic Fitch in 1963) has been described by many authors2 as an argument which threatens the epistemic, and the intuitionistic, conception of truth. In order to establish whether this is really so, one has to understand (...)
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  41. Scott Sehon, Dementors, Horcruxes, and Immortality: The Soul in Harry Potter.score: 24.0
    Souls play a huge part in the Harry Potter story. Voldemort creates six Horcruxes, thereby dividing his own soul into seven parts, and Harry must destroy all of the Horcruxes before Voldemort can die. At different points in the books, several main characters (Harry, Sirius, and Dudley) narrowly avoid having their souls sucked out of them by a dementor; Barty Crouch, Jr., does not escape this fate. So what is the soul? In Harry Potter’s world, it is clear that people (...)
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  42. R. J. Hirst (1959). The Problems Of Perception. Macmillan.score: 24.0
    As our chief aim is a comprehensive theory of perception which will cover all the facts, ... JR Smythies' Analysis of Perception I discuss in Ch. VI, § 6. ...
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  43. Mary I. Bockover (2010). Confucianism and Ethics in the Western Philosophical Tradition II: A Comparative Analysis of Personhood. Philosophy Compass 5 (4):317-325.score: 24.0
    This Philosophy Compass article continues the comparison between Confucian and mainstream Western views of personhood and their connection with ethics begun in Confucianism and Ethics in the Western Philosophical Tradition I: Fundamental Concepts , by focusing on the Western self conceived as an independent agent with moral and political rights. More specifically, the present article briefly accounts for how the more strictly and explicitly individualistic notion of self dominating Western philosophy has developed, leading up to a recent debate in modern (...)
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  44. William J. Danaher Jr (2010). Music That Will Bring Back the Dead? Resurrection, Reconciliation, and Restorative Justice in Post-Apartheid South Africa. Journal of Religious Ethics 38 (1):115-141.score: 24.0
    This essay explores how the doctrine of the Resurrection informs theological reflection on reconciliation in post-Apartheid South Africa. It begins by establishing the fragile and liminal state of reconciliation, despite the efforts of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission. It then argues that the Resurrection offers an ecstatic and relational understanding of the human, which in turn provides a basis for advancing claims regarding human dignity and well-being. In conversation with the work of Oliver O'Donovan and James Alison on the Resurrection, (...)
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  45. Jonathan Kvanvig (2009). Restriction Strategies for Knowability : Some Lessons in False Hope. In Joe Salerno (ed.), New Essays on the Knowability Paradox. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    The knowability paradox derives from a proof by Frederic Fitch in 1963. The proof purportedly shows that if all truths are knowable, it follows that all truths are known. Antirealists, wed as they are to the idea that truth is epistemic, feel threatened by the proof. For what better way to express the epistemic character of truth than to insist that all truths are knowable? Yet, if that insistence logically compels similar assent to some omniscience claim, antirealism is in (...)
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  46. David Reiter (1998). Engel on Internalism & Externalism in Epistemology. Erkenntnis 49 (2):175-184.score: 24.0
    Mylan Engel, Jr. has proposed a straightforward and attractive explanation of the internalism-externalism controversy (IEC) in contemporary epistemology. Engel's explanation posits that there are two distinct kinds of epistemic justification, and the IEC has arisen because epistemologists have inadvertently overlooked the fact that they are not all concerned with the same subject matter (internalists are concerned with one kind of epistemic justification while externalists are concerned with another kind). In this paper, I will explain two difficulties with Engel's proposed (...)
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  47. Lynne Rudder Baker (1985). Was Leibniz Entitled to Possible Worlds? Canadian Journal of Philosophy 15 (1):57-74.score: 24.0
    Leibniz has enjoyed a prominent place in the history of thought about possible worlds.' I shall argue that on the feading interpretation of Leibniz's account of contingency — an ingenious interpretation with ample textual support — possible worlds may be invoked by Leibniz only on pain of inconsistency. Leibnizian contingency, as reconstructed in detail by Robert C. Sleigh, Jr.,z will be shown to preclude propositions with different truth-values in different possible worlds.
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  48. Jeffrie G. Murphy (2012). Punishment and the Moral Emotions: Essays in Law, Morality, and Religion. OUP USA.score: 24.0
    This collection of essays presents Jeffrie G. Murphy's most recent ideas on punishment, forgiveness, and the emotions of resentment, shame, guilt, remorse, love, and jealousy. In Murphy's view, conscious rationales of principle -- such as crime control or giving others what in justice they deserve -- do not always drive our decisions to punish or condemn others for wrongdoing. Sometimes our decisions are in fact driven by powerful and rather base emotions such as malice, spite, envy, and cruelty. But our (...)
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  49. Ralph H. Johnson & Christopher W. Tindale (2013). Introduction. Philosophy and Rhetoric 46 (4):379-391.score: 24.0
    When considering the interactions between rhetoric and argumentation, readers of this journal will no doubt be reminded of the seminal work of Henry W. Johnstone Jr. (1959; 1978) who gathered both concerns together in ways that were designed to engage philosophers and persuade them of the intellectual seriousness of both enterprises. He was, of course, a principal force among those who brought Chaïm Perelman’s work to the attention of audiences in North America, and he himself entered into deep and (...)
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