Search results for 'Free schools' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Geoffrey Walford (ed.) (2015). Academies, Free Schools and Social Justice. Routledge.
    Academies were introduced by Labour in 2000 and first opened their doors in 2002, but during Labour’s time in power the nature of the Academies changed. At first they were designed to replace existing failing schools but, by 2004, the expectation had widened to provide for entirely new schools where there was a demand for new places. From 2010, under the coalition government, two new types of Academy were introduced. While the original Academies were based on the idea (...)
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  2.  9
    Peter Goldstone (1975). Free Schools The Teacher Was the Sea: The Story of Pacific High School. Studies in Philosophy and Education 9 (1-2):35-61.
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  3.  4
    David Nyberg (1973). Free Schools, Culture and Anarchy: Or, Mr. Kozol, Meet Mr. Arnold. Educational Theory 23 (1):90-99.
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  4. Joan DelFattore (2012). Knowledge in the Making: Academic Freedom and Free Speech in America's Schools and Universities. Yale University Press.
    How free are students and teachers to express unpopular ideas in public schools and universities? Not free enough, Joan DelFattore suggests. Wading without hesitation into some of the most contentious issues of our times, she investigates battles over a wide range of topics that have fractured school and university communities—homosexuality-themed children's books, research on race-based intelligence, the teaching of evolution, the regulation of hate speech, and more—and with her usual evenhanded approach offers insights supported by theory and (...)
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  5. Joan DelFattore (2010). Knowledge in the Making: Academic Freedom and Free Speech in America's Schools and Universities. Yale University Press.
    How free are students and teachers to express unpopular ideas in public schools and universities? Not free enough, Joan DelFattore suggests. Wading without hesitation into some of the most contentious issues of our times, she investigates battles over a wide range of topics that have fractured school and university communities—homosexuality-themed children's books, research on race-based intelligence, the teaching of evolution, the regulation of hate speech, and more—and with her usual evenhanded approach offers insights supported by theory and (...)
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  6. Rosemary Chamberlin (1989). Free Children and Democratic Schools: A Philosophical Study of Liberty and Education. Falmer Press.
     
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  7. Rosemary Deem (1994). Free Marketeers or Good Citizens? Educational Policy and Lay Participation in the Administration of Schools. British Journal of Educational Studies 42 (1):23-37.
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  8.  4
    Rosemary Deem (1994). Free Marketeers or Good Citizens? Educational Policy and Lay Participation in the Administration of Schools. British Journal of Educational Studies 42 (1):23-37.
    This paper examines what can be learnt from analysing attempts to give lay people more involvement in the administration of state schools. Although devolving more responsibility to schools and lay governors has been an important feature of school reform in several countries, it is not immediately apparent if this shift is the product of globally similar social and political forces or nationally specific cultural, ideological and economic factors. In considering this issue, the paper describes recent changes in school (...)
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  9.  29
    Joel H. Spring (2006). Wheels in the Head: Educational Philosophies of Authority, Freedom, and Culture From Socrates to Human Rights. L. Erlbaum Associates, Publishers.
    In this popular text, Joel Spring provocatively analyzes the ideas of traditional and non-traditional philosophers, from Plato to Paulo Freire, regarding the contribution of education to the creation of a democratic society. Each section focuses on an important theme: “Autocratic and Democratic Forms of Education;” “Dissenting Traditions in Education;” “The Politics of Culture;” “The Politics of Gender;” and “Education and Human Rights.” This edition features a special emphasis on human rights education. Spring advocates a legally binding right to an education (...)
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  10.  2
    Robin Barrow (1978). Radical Education: A Critique of Freeschooling and Deschooling. M. Robertson.
  11. Joel Denker & Steve Bhaerman (1982). No Particular Place to Go, Second Edition: The Making of a Free High School. Southern Illinois University Press.
    The story of a group of teachers and high school students who from 1968 to 1970_ _broke away from the public schools to start an al­ternative school of their own design. The introductory chapters focus on Den­ker and Bhaerman, explaining how they came to start the project. The middle two chapters center on events and issues during the two years the authors were with the school. The final two chapters analyze the politics of free schools and the (...)
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  12. Clive Dimmock (2011). Diversifying Schools and Leveraging School Improvement: A Comparative Analysis of the English Radical, and Singapore Conservative, Specialist Schools' Policies. British Journal of Educational Studies 59 (4):439 - 458.
    Within the context of fierce global economic competition, school diversification and specialist schools have been seen by governments as cornerstones of education policy to engineer school improvement in both England and Singapore for more than a decade. In both systems, the policy has manifested in different school types, school names and sometimes buildings-in England, specialist status schools, academies and most recently free schools; and in Singapore, specialist schools and niche schools. Diversification is promoted by (...)
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  13.  58
    Angela N. H. Creager (1996). Wendell Stanley's Dream of a Free-Standing Biochemistry Department at the University of California, Berkeley. Journal of the History of Biology 29 (3):331 - 360.
    Scientists and historians have often presumed that the divide between biochemistry and molecular biology is fundamentally epistemological.100 The historiography of molecular biology as promulgated by Max Delbrück's phage disciples similarly emphasizes inherent differences between the archaic tradition of biochemistry and the approach of phage geneticists, the ur molecular biologists. A historical analysis of the development of both disciplines at Berkeley mitigates against accepting predestined differences, and underscores the similarities between the postwar development of biochemistry and the emergence of molecular biology (...)
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  14.  28
    Luis Xavier López-Farjeat (2007). Determinism and Free Will in Alexander of Aphrodisias and the Arabic Tradition. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 81:161-177.
    The Arabic tradition knew Alexander’s treatises On Fate and On Providence. Alexander criticizes the Stoic determinism with some peripatetic arguments. In those treatises we can find, at least, two positions: the peripatetic and “libertarian” position represented by Alexander, and Stoic determinism. A very similar discussion can be found in Islamic tradition. As S. Van den Bergh has insisted, Islamic theological schools had some Stoic influences. One of the issues in which we can find some common views is, precisely, the (...)
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  15.  35
    Daniel Jacobson (2004). The Academic Betrayal of Free Speech. Social Philosophy and Policy 21 (2):48-80.
    “ 'Free speech' is just the name we give to verbal behavior that serves the substantive agendas we wish to advance”—or so literary theorist and professor of law Stanley Fish has claimed. This cynical dictum is one of several skeptical challenges to freedom of speech that have been extremely influential in the American academy. I will follow the skeptics' lead by distinguishing between two broad styles of critique: the progressive and the postmodern. Fish's dictum, however, like many of the (...)
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  16.  4
    Fang Zhuangyou (1987). A Preliminary Investigation of the Contending Among the Hundred Schools in the Song Dynasty. Contemporary Chinese Thought 18 (3):10-80.
    Since the time when Comrade Mao Zedong and the party's Central Committee, summing up the experience and lessons of Chinese and world history, proposed the correct policy of "letting a hundred flowers bloom and a hundred schools contend" as a general guideline for the promotion of a flowering in science and arts, academic circles throughout the country have raised a number of scholarly questions and published different opinions. There have been many healthy and vibrant developments in the academic style (...)
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  17.  9
    Bryan R. Warnick (2012). Student Rights to Religious Expression and the Special Characteristics of Schools. Educational Theory 62 (1):59-74.
    In this essay Bryan Warnick explores how rights to religious expression should be understood for students in public schools. Warnick frames student religious rights as a debate between the conflicting values associated with the Free Exercise Clause and the values associated with the Establishment Clause of the United States Constitution. He then asks how the special characteristics of the school environment should guide us in prioritizing those values. The overall weight of the considerations, particularly concerns about civic education, (...)
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  18.  3
    Tilaye Yeshanew, Ian Schagen & Suzanne Evans (2008). Faith Schools and Pupils' Progress Through Primary Education. Educational Studies 34 (5):511-526.
    The impact of faith schools on the performance and progress of their pupils has been studied using data from the National Pupil Database . The value‐added analysis was carried out using multilevel modelling, controlling for prior attainment as well as a range of background variables, including ethnicity, sex, eligibility for free school meals , alternative measures of deprivation based on census information, special educational needs and English as an additional language . The analysis confirmed that all faith (...), in particular, Roman Catholic and Church of England schools, made slightly more progress with their pupils than non‐faith schools. It also showed that pupils with SEN attending faith schools performed better at key stage 2 than pupils with SEN in non‐faith schools. (shrink)
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  19.  2
    Angela Johnson, Lin Muilenburg, Katy Arnett & Lois Thomas Stover (2012). Combating Symbolic Violence in Public Schools. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies 21 (1):52-69.
    A decent education is a basic human right. The provision of free, compulsory education in the US attests to a national commitment to this right. However, thecurrent school system is plagued by inequities, including spending less money on schools serving predominantly poor and non-White populations, subjectingstudents of color to harsher punishments, putting non-White students in special education tracks at higher rates, and neglecting students who are not fluent inEnglish. These inequities are taken for granted within the school system, (...)
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  20.  44
    Matthew R. Dasti & Edwin F. Bryant (eds.) (2014). Free Will, Agency, and Selfhood in Indian Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
    If one were to make a list of the leading topics of debate in classical Indian philosophy, contenders might include the existence and nature of the self; the fundamental sources of knowledge; the nature of the engagement between consciousness and reality; the existence and nature of God/Brahman; the proper account of causation; the relationship between language and the world; the practices that best ensure future happiness; the most expedient method for any soteriological attainment (or not); or the fundamental constituents of (...)
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  21. Sara Goering, Nicholas J. Shudak & Thomas E. Wartenberg (eds.) (2013). Philosophy in Schools: An Introduction for Philosophers and Teachers. Routledge.
    All of us ponder the big and enduring human questions—Who am I? Am I free? What should I do? What is good? Is there justice? Is life meaningful?—but this kind of philosophical interrogation is rarely carefully explored or even taken seriously in most primary and secondary school settings. However, introducing philosophy to young people well before they get to college can help to develop and deepen critical and creative thinking, foster social and behavioral skills, and increase philosophical awareness. _Philosophy (...)
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  22. Sara Goering, Nicholas J. Shudak & Thomas E. Wartenberg (eds.) (2013). Philosophy in Schools: An Introduction for Philosophers and Teachers. Routledge.
    All of us ponder the big and enduring human questions—Who am I? Am I free? What should I do? What is good? Is there justice? Is life meaningful?—but this kind of philosophical interrogation is rarely carefully explored or even taken seriously in most primary and secondary school settings. However, introducing philosophy to young people well before they get to college can help to develop and deepen critical and creative thinking, foster social and behavioral skills, and increase philosophical awareness. _Philosophy (...)
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  23. Daniel Heller (2007). Curriculum on the Edge of Survival: How Schools Fail to Prepare Students for Membership in a Democracy. R&L Education.
    Daniel Heller contends that public education is in a downward spiral because we have failed to notice the erosion of the basic curricular dimensions which support the preparation of students as active participants in our ever-changing world. While many books explain procedural knowledge such as how to differentiate instruction, how to create standards-based curriculum, or how to write a constructivist lesson—Curriculum on the Edge of Survival discusses the "what" and "why" rather than the how. What is the purpose of (...) in a free, democratic society, and why is the answer to that question crucial in deciding the most fundamental questions about curriculum? (shrink)
     
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  24. Daniel Heller (2012). Curriculum on the Edge of Survival: How Schools Fail to Prepare Students for Membership in a Democracy. R&L Education.
    Daniel Heller contends that public education is in a downward spiral because we have failed to notice the erosion of the basic curricular dimensions which support the preparation of students as active participants in our ever-changing world. While many books explain procedural knowledge such as how to differentiate instruction, how to create standards-based curriculum, or how to write a constructivist lesson, the second edition of Curriculum on the Edge of Survival discusses the "what" and "why" rather than the how. What (...)
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  25. Edward Nell (ed.) (2009). Free Market Conservatism : A Critique of Theory & Practice. Routledge.
    First published in 1984, this book carefully dissects and convincingly demonstrates that conservative economics is incoherent in theory and disastrous in practice. The three main schools of thought supporting "free-market" policies – supply side economics, monetarism and rational expectations – are examined in turn and each is found defective. Three case studies of conservative policy in action follow: Reagan’s U.S., Thatcher’s U.K. and Pinochet’s Chile and their courses are charted in depth. In addition, Robert Heilbroner and Edward Nell (...)
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  26. Matthew R. Dasti & Edwin F. Bryant (eds.) (2014). Free Will, Agency, and Selfhood in Indian Philosophy. Oxford University Press Usa.
    Led by Buddhists and the yoga traditions of Hinduism and Jainism, Indian thinkers have long engaged in a rigorous analysis and reconceptualization of our common notion of self. Less understood is the way in which such theories of self intersect with issues involving agency and free will; yet such intersections are profoundly important, as all major schools of Indian thought recognize that moral goodness and religious fulfillment depend on the proper understanding of personal agency. Moreover, their individual conceptions (...)
     
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  27. Meg Wallace (forthcoming). Free, Compulsory and Secular? Australian Humanist, The 123:8.
    Wallace, Meg Secular education for all children is a human right. Public education must be free, secular and compulsory in all Australian states except Queensland, so it is a legal right in those states. Nevertheless, federal and state governments are funding and assisting religious instruction in public schools, and children are placed in these classes, subjected to religious persuasion and practices, even when parents specify their child is not to attend. Let me tell you about one parent who (...)
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  28.  18
    Lex Donaldson (2008). Ethics Problems and Problems with Ethics: Toward a Pro-Management Theory. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 78 (3):299 - 311.
    The move towards having more teaching of business ethics comes in part from a tendency to view managers negatively, drawing on anti-management theories that are presently popular in business schools. This can lead to a misdiagnosis of the causes of contemporary business problems. Teaching business ethics can, however, be ineffectual and counter-productive. Education in ethical philosophy can lead managers to be indecisive, sceptical or to rationalize poor conduct. The ethics of academics become salient and lapses in them undercut their (...)
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  29.  16
    Amy Salyzyn (2013). Canada: Foreclosures, Freemen, Foreign Law Schools and the Continuing Search for Meaningful Access to Justice. Legal Ethics 16 (1):223-229.
    This article is currently available as a free download on ingentaconnect.
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  30. Dan Dugan & Judy Daar (1994). Are Rudolf Steiner's Waldorf Schools' Non-Sectarian'. Free Inquiry 14 (2):1-7.
     
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  31.  14
    Deborah Fraser * (2004). Secular Schools, Spirituality and Maori Values. Journal of Moral Education 33 (1):87-95.
    New Zealand has had free, state, secular education since 1877, but just what is meant by secularism is changing. Since the 1980s the growth of Maori education initiatives has mushroomed and these place emphasis on Maori values and beliefs, including spirituality. In addition, in 1999 a definition and statement on spirituality appeared in the health and physical education national curriculum document. This statement referred to values, beliefs, meaning and purpose. It also incorporated a Maori model of well?being which places (...)
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  32.  11
    Sara Goering, Nicholas J. Shudak & Thomas E. Wartenberg (eds.) (2012). Philosophy in Schools: An Introduction for Philosophers and Teachers. Routledge.
    All of us ponder the big and enduring human questions—Who am I? Am I free? What should I do? What is good? Is there justice?
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  33. Tibor Machan (2007). Schools Without the State? Free Inquiry 27:23-23.
     
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  34. Robert H. Kane (1996). The Significance of Free Will. Oxford University Press.
    In the past quarter-century, there has been a resurgence of interest in philosophical questions about free will. After a clear and broad-reaching survey of these recent debates, Robert Kane presents his own controversial view. Arguing persuasively for a traditional incompatibilist or libertarian conception of free will, Kane demonstrates that such a conception can be made intelligible without appeals to obscure or mysterious forms of agency and thus can be reconconciled with a contemporary scientific picture of the world.
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  35. Derk Pereboom (2001). Living Without Free Will. Cambridge University Press.
    Most people assume that, even though some degenerative or criminal behavior may be caused by influences beyond our control, ordinary human actions are not similarly generated, but rather are freely chosen, and we can be praiseworthy or blameworthy for them. A less popular and more radical claim is that factors beyond our control produce all of the actions we perform. It is this hard determinist stance that Derk Pereboom articulates in Living Without Free Will. Pereboom argues that our best (...)
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  36. Alfred R. Mele (2006). Free Will and Luck. Oxford University Press.
    Mele's ultimate purpose in this book is to help readers think more clearly about free will. He identifies and makes vivid the most important conceptual obstacles to justified belief in the existence of free will and meets them head on. Mele clarifies the central issues in the philosophical debate about free will and moral responsibility, criticizes various influential contemporary theories about free will, and develops two overlapping conceptions of free will--one for readers who are convinced (...)
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  37. Daniel C. Dennett (1984). Elbow Room: The Varieties of Free Will Worth Wanting. MIT Press.
    Essays discuss reason, self-control, self-definition, time, cause and effect, accidents, and responsibility, and explain why people want free will.
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  38.  42
    John Martin Fischer (1994). The Metaphysics of Free Will: An Essay on Control. Blackwell.
    The Metaphysics of Free Will provides a through statement of the major grounds for skepticism about the reality of free will and moral responsibility. The author identifies and explains the sort of control that is associated with personhood and accountability, and shows how it is consistent with causal determinism. In so doing, out view of ourselves as morally responsible agents is protected against the disturbing changes posed by science and religion.
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  39. Eddy Nahmias (2011). Intuitions About Free Will, Determinism, and Bypassing. In Robert Kane (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Free Will, 2nd Ed. Oxford University Press
    It is often called “the problem of free will and determinism,” as if the only thing that might challenge free will is determinism and as if determinism is obviously a problem. The traditional debates about free will have proceeded accordingly. Typically, incompatibilists about free will and determinism suggest that their position is intuitive or commonsensical, such that compatibilists have the burden of showing how, despite appearances, the problem of determinism is not really a problem. Compatibilists, in (...)
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  40. Neil Levy (2011). Hard Luck: How Luck Undermines Free Will and Moral Responsibility. Oxford University Press.
    The concept of luck has played an important role in debates concerning free will and moral responsibility, yet participants in these debates have relied upon an intuitive notion of what luck is. Neil Levy develops an account of luck, which is then applied to the free will debate. He argues that the standard luck objection succeeds against common accounts of libertarian free will, but that it is possible to amend libertarian accounts so that they are no more (...)
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  41. Eddy Nahmias, Stephen G. Morris, Thomas Nadelhoffer & Jason Turner (2005). Surveying Freedom: Folk Intuitions About Free Will and Moral Responsibility. Philosophical Psychology 18 (5):561-584.
    Philosophers working in the nascent field of ‘experimental philosophy’ have begun using methods borrowed from psychology to collect data about folk intuitions concerning debates ranging from action theory to ethics to epistemology. In this paper we present the results of our attempts to apply this approach to the free will debate, in which philosophers on opposing sides claim that their view best accounts for and accords with folk intuitions. After discussing the motivation for such research, we describe our methodology (...)
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  42. Alfred R. Mele (2007). Free Will and Luck. Philosophical Explorations 10 (2):153 – 155.
    Mele's ultimate purpose in this book is to help readers think more clearly about free will. He identifies and makes vivid the most important conceptual obstacles to justified belief in the existence of free will and meets them head on. Mele clarifies the central issues in the philosophical debate about free will and moral responsibility, criticizes various influential contemporary theories about free will, and develops two overlapping conceptions of free will--one for readers who are convinced (...)
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  43. Randolph Clarke (2003). Libertarian Accounts of Free Will. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    This comprehensive study offers a balanced assessment of libertarian accounts of free will.
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  44. Gregg D. Caruso (2016). Free Will Skepticism and Criminal Behavior: A Public Health-Quarantine Model. Southwest Philosophy Review 32 (1):25-48.
    One of the most frequently voiced criticisms of free will skepticism is that it is unable to adequately deal with criminal behavior and that the responses it would permit as justified are insufficient for acceptable social policy. This concern is fueled by two factors. The first is that one of the most prominent justifications for punishing criminals, retributivism, is incompatible with free will skepticism. The second concern is that alternative justifications that are not ruled out by the skeptical (...)
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  45. Lara Buchak (2013). Free Acts and Chance: Why The Rollback Argument Fails. Philosophical Quarterly 63 (250):20-28.
    The ‘rollback argument,’ pioneered by Peter van Inwagen, purports to show that indeterminism in any form is incompatible with free will. The argument has two major premises: the first claims that certain facts about chances obtain in a certain kind of hypothetical situation, and the second that these facts entail that some actual act is not free. Since the publication of the rollback argument, the second claim has been vehemently debated, but everyone seems to have taken the first (...)
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  46.  99
    Jim Hopkins (2016). Free Energy and Virtual Reality in Psychoanalysis and Neuroscience: A Complexity Theory of Dreaming and Mental Disorder. Frontiers in Psychology 7.
    This paper compares the free energy neuroscience now advocated by Karl Friston and his colleagues with that hypothesised by Freud, arguing that Freud's notions of conflict and trauma can be understood in terms of computational complexity. It relates Hobson and Friston's work on dreaming and the reduction of complexity to contemporary accounts of dreaming and the consolidation of memory, and advances the hypothesis that mental disorder can be understood in terms of computational complexity and the mechanisms, including synaptic pruning, (...)
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  47. Gregg Caruso (forthcoming). Free Will Skepticism and Its Implications: An Argument for Optimism. In Elizabeth Shaw (ed.), Free Will Skepticism in Law and Society.
  48. Manuel Vargas (2013). How to Solve the Problem of Free Will. In Paul Russell & Oisin Deery (eds.), The Philosophy of Free Will: Essential Readings From the Contemporary Debates. OUP Usa 400.
    This paper outlines one way of thinking about the problem of free will, some general reasons for dissatisfactions with traditional approaches to solving it, and some considerations in favor of pursuing a broadly revisionist solution to it. If you are looking for a student-friendly introduction to revisionist theorizing about free will, this is probably the thing to look at.
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  49. Marcus Arvan (2013). A New Theory of Free Will. Philosophical Forum 44 (1):1-48.
    This paper shows that several live philosophical and scientific hypotheses – including the holographic principle and multiverse theory in quantum physics, and eternalism and mind-body dualism in philosophy – jointly imply an audacious new theory of free will. This new theory, "Libertarian Compatibilism", holds that the physical world is an eternally existing array of two-dimensional information – a vast number of possible pasts, presents, and futures – and the mind a nonphysical entity or set of properties that "read" that (...)
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  50. John Martin Fischer (ed.) (2007). Four Views on Free Will. Blackwell Pub..
    Focusing on the concepts and interactions of free will, moral responsibility, and determinism, this text represents the most up-to-date account of the four major positions in the free will debate. Four serious and well-known philosophers explore the opposing viewpoints of libertarianism, compatibilism, hard incompatibilism, and revisionism The first half of the book contains each philosopher’s explanation of his particular view; the second half allows them to directly respond to each other’s arguments, in a lively and engaging conversation Offers (...)
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