Search results for 'Free thought' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. John Stephenson Spink (1960/1969). French Free-Thought From Gassendi to Voltaire. New York, Greenwood Press.score: 75.0
  2. Roger N. Shepard (2008). The Step to Rationality: The Efficacy of Thought Experiments in Science, Ethics, and Free Will. Cognitive Science 32 (1):3-35.score: 60.0
  3. Robin Douglass (2010). Free Will and the Problem of Evil: Reconciling Rousseau's Divided Thought. History of Political Thought 31 (4):639-655.score: 51.0
    This article aims to resolve the apparent contradiction in Rousseau's oeuvre concerning the origin of man's evil. In the Second Discourse a naturalistic explanation for the development of evil is given, whereas in Emile the Savoyard Vicar propounds a deontological account. The two can be reconciled, however, through a precise understanding of the nature and bearing of Rousseau's conception of free will. The analysis challenges O'Hagan's interpretation and suggests that the irreducible tensions within Rousseau's thought can be resolved (...)
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  4. Diane Blakemore (2013). Voice and Expressivity in Free Indirect Thought Representations: Imitation and Representation. Mind and Language 28 (5):579-605.score: 48.0
    This article addresses issues in the philosophy of fiction from the perspective of a relevance theoretic approach to communication: first, how should we understand the notion of ‘voice’ as it is used in the analysis of free indirect style narratives; and, second, in what sense can the person responsible for free indirect representations of fictional characters' thoughts be regarded as a communicator? The background to these questions is the debate about the roles of pretence and attribution in (...) indirect style. I argue that the role of expressives in sustaining the illusion that fictional characters speak their inner thoughts suggests that ‘voice’ should be understood in two distinct ways. On the one hand, there are cases in which the use of expressive devices leads to the formation of thoughts which are understood to resemble other (attributed) thoughts. On the other hand, there are other cases in which expressives are used as a means of simulating a fictional character's behaviour or style. At the same time, I argue that in order to accommodate free indirect thought representation in a relevance theoretic model of communication, the responsibility for ensuring that the effort of processing the text will be rewarded by optimal relevance must be decoupled from the point of view that is being represented. While the (constructed) author is responsible for orchestrating our interpretation of free indirect thought representations so that the effort of processing will result in optimal relevance, the reader does not necessarily assume this function is being performed by someone who intends to communicate their own thoughts: the relevance of the act of narration may instead lie in the sense of mutuality achieved between reader and character. (shrink)
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  5. Moorhouse F. X. Millar (1926). Free Thought in the Social Sciences. Thought 1 (1):183-186.score: 48.0
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  6. Susanne Bobzien (2012). A Free Will: Origins of the Notion in Ancient Thought (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 50 (2):292-293.score: 45.0
    Much of chapters 2 to 6 is in agreement with publications from the last twenty years (including those of the reviewer); so for example Frede’s points that neither Aristotle nor the Stoics had a notion of free-will; that in Epictetus (for the first time) the notions of freedom and will were combined; that an indeterminist notion of free-will occurs first in Alexander. The achievement of these chapters lies in the way Frede carefully joins them together and uses them (...)
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  7. Paul Oskar Kristeller (1968). The Myth of Renaissance Atheism and the French Tradition of Free Thought. Journal of the History of Philosophy 6 (3):233-243.score: 45.0
  8. G. K. Chesterton (2010). The Dogmas of Free Thought. The Chesterton Review 36 (1-2):18-25.score: 45.0
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  9. A. D. Lindsay (1927). Free-Thought in the Social Sciences. By J. A. Hobson . (London: G. Allen & Unwin. 1926. Pp. 288. Price 10s.). Philosophy 2 (06):259-.score: 45.0
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  10. Ian W. Alexander (1962). French Free-Thought From Gassendi to Voltaire. By J. S. Spink. (University of London, The Athlone Press, 1960. Pp. Ix + 345. Price 50s.). [REVIEW] Philosophy 37 (142):369-.score: 45.0
  11. Michael L. Hall (1997). Book Review: On Dialogue: An Essay in Free Thought. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Literature 21 (1):181-184.score: 45.0
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  12. D. B. C. (1926). Book Review:Free Thought in the Social Sciences. J. A. Hobson. [REVIEW] Ethics 36 (4):430-.score: 45.0
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  13. Pamela J. Brown (1987). Free Thought and Free Trade: The Analogy Between Scientific and Entrepreneurial Discovery Process. Journal of Libertarian Studies 8 (2):289-92.score: 45.0
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  14. Carveth Read (1907). Book Review:A Short History of Free Thought. John M. Robertson. [REVIEW] Ethics 17 (4):513-.score: 45.0
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  15. E. Caruso (1987). Paris and Amsterdam, Traditionalism and Free-Thought in 2 Different Editions of The'journal Des Scavans'+ 18th-Century Discussions of Locke. [REVIEW] Rivista di Storia Della Filosofia 42 (3):439-464.score: 45.0
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  16. G. K. Chesterton (2007). An Open Letter on the Failure of Free Thought. The Chesterton Review 33 (3/4):445-449.score: 45.0
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  17. Frank Granger (1903). The Right of Free Thought in Matters of Religion. International Journal of Ethics 14 (1):16-26.score: 45.0
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  18. Robert Grudin (1997). Book Review: On Dialogue: An Essay in Free Thought. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Literature 21 (1).score: 45.0
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  19. Kile Jones (2010). Lest We Forget: Free-Thought and the Environment. Human Affairs 20 (4):294-299.score: 45.0
    Name der Zeitschrift: Human Affairs Jahrgang: 20 Heft: 4 Seiten: 294-299.
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  20. Martin Mulsow (2008). The Libertine's Two Bodies: Moral Persona and Free Thought in Early Modern Europe. Intellectual History Review 18 (3):337-347.score: 45.0
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  21. Jonathan Ranch (forthcoming). New Threats to Free Thought. Ethics, Information, and Technology: Readings.score: 45.0
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  22. John Skorupski, Liberalism as Free Thought.score: 45.0
    John Stuart Mill is the philosopher of liberalism. Or so some people think. Others disagree; they may give that status to Locke, or (perhaps) to Kant. Or they may think the question frivolous and insist – boringly but, I cannot deny, sensibly – that no one thinker is the philosopher of liberalism.
     
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  23. J. M. W. (1961). French Free Thought From Gassendi to Voltaire. Review of Metaphysics 15 (1):196-196.score: 45.0
  24. Maria De Cillis (2014). Free Will and Predestination in Iislamic Thought: Theoretical Compromises in the Works of Avicenna, Ghazali and Ibn Arabi. Routledge.score: 42.0
  25. Benedictus de Spinoza (2007). Theological-Political Treatise. Cambridge University Press.score: 42.0
    Spinoza's Theological-Political Treatise (1670) is one of the most important philosophical works of the early modern period. In it Spinoza discusses at length the historical circumstances of the composition and transmission of the Bible, demonstrating the fallibility of both its authors and its interpreters. He argues that free enquiry is not only consistent with the security and prosperity of a state but actually essential to them, and that such freedom flourishes best in a democratic and republican state in which (...)
     
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  26. Sarah Stroumsa (1999). Freethinkers of Medieval Islam: Ibn Al-Rawāndī, Abū Bakr Al-Rāzī and Their Impact on Islamic Thought. Brill.score: 39.0
    This book endeavors to identify and define the phenomenon of freethinking in medieval Islam, in particular as exemplified in the figures of the two most ...
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  27. Anthony Collins (1707/1984). An Essay Concerning the Use of Reasons in Propositions ; a Discourse of Free-Thinking. Garland.score: 39.0
     
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  28. Benedictus de Spinoza (1962). Spinoza on Freedom of Thought. Montreal, M. Casalini.score: 39.0
  29. Siegfried C. A. Fay & Ilse Maria Bruckner (eds.) (2011). Buddhism as a Stronghold of Free Thinking?: Social, Ethical and Philosophical Dimensions of Buddhism. Edition Ubuntu.score: 39.0
     
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  30. Solomon Feferman (2011). Gödel's Incompleteness Theorems, Free Will and Mathematical Thought. In Richard Swinburne (ed.), Free Will and Modern Science. Oup/British Academy.score: 39.0
  31. Philippe Schlenker (2004). Context of Thought and Context of Utterance: A Note on Free Indirect Discourse and the Historical Present. Mind and Language 19 (3):279–304.score: 36.0
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  32. Cary J. Nederman (1999). Amazing Grace: Fortune, God, and Free Will in Machiavelli's Thought. Journal of the History of Ideas 60 (4):617-638.score: 36.0
  33. J. P. Day (1998). Mill on the Moral Right to Free Expression of Thought. Journal of Social Philosophy 29 (3):41-45.score: 36.0
  34. Eliyahu Rosenow (1973). What is Free Education? The Educational Significance of Nietzsche's Thought. Educational Theory 23 (4):354-370.score: 36.0
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  35. L. Jonathan Cohen (1956). American Thought: A Critical Sketch. By M. R. Cohen (Edited by F. S. Cohen). (The Free Press, Glencoe, Illinois. 1954.Pp. 360. Price $5.00.). [REVIEW] Philosophy 31 (117):166-.score: 36.0
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  36. G. E. M. Anscombe (1995). How Can a Man Be Free? Spinoza's Thought and That of Some Others. Aletheia 7:21.score: 36.0
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  37. Andrea Gatt (2007). Charles Blount and Free English Thought. Giornale Critico Della Filosofia Italiana 3 (3):527-534.score: 36.0
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  38. Tim Hegedus (2003). Necessity and Free Will in the Thought of Bardaisan of Edessa. Laval Théologique Et Philosophique 59 (2):333-344.score: 36.0
  39. Pavol Labuda (2011). A Free Will: Origins of the Notion in Ancient Thought. Filozofia 66 (9):928-934.score: 36.0
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  40. Beatrice Lienemann (2012). M. Frede, A Free Will. Origins of the Notion in Ancient Thought. Bochumer Philosophisches Jahrbuch Fur Antike Und Mittelalter 15 (1):252-266.score: 36.0
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  41. Susan Sauvé Meyer (2013). A Free Will: Origins of the Notion in Ancient Thought by Michael Frede (Review). Classical World 106 (3):535-536.score: 36.0
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  42. John Phillips (2013). A Free Will: Origins of the Notion in Ancient Thought, by Michael Frede. Ancient Philosophy 33 (2):458-464.score: 36.0
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  43. Charles Pinches (1989). Christian Pacifism and Theodicy: The Free Will Defense in the Thought of JohnH. Yoder. Modern Theology 5 (3):239-255.score: 36.0
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  44. L. A. R. (1950). Book Review:Free Government in the Making: Readings in American Political Thought A. T. Mason. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 17 (4):361-.score: 36.0
  45. Dorothy Tarrant (1949). The Contribution of Plato to Free Religious Thought. London, Lindsey Press.score: 36.0
     
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  46. Elizabeth Wright (1991). Reviews : Phyllis Grosskurth, Melanie Klein: Her World and Her Work, London: Maresfield Library, H. Karnac (Books), 1989 (1985), Paper £14.95, X + 515 Pp. Nini Herman, My Kleinian Home: A Journey Through Four Psychotherapies, London: Free Association Books, 1988, Paper £9.95, 163 Pp. R. D. Hinshelwood, A Dictionary of Kleinian Thought, London: Free Association Books, 1989, £30.00, 482 Pp. Juliet Mitchell (Ed.), The Selected Melanie Klein, Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1986, Paper £5.99, 256 Pp. [REVIEW] History of the Human Sciences 4 (2):294-296.score: 36.0
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  47. Benedictus de Spinoza (1883/2004). A Theologico-Political Treatise. Dover Publications.score: 33.0
    Two important works by one of philosophy's most original and penetrating thinkers appear in this volume. Spinoza's "A Theologico-Political Treatise" presents an eloquent plea for religious liberty, demonstrating that true religion consists of the practice of simple piety, independent of philosophical speculation. He examines the Bible at length to show that freedom of thought and speech are consistent with the religious life. In the unfinished "A Political Treatise," the author develops a theory of government founded on common consent.
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  48. Floyd H. Allport (1920). The Influence of the Group Upon Association and Thought. Journal of Experimental Psychology 3 (3):159.score: 33.0
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  49. Benedictus de Spinoza (1989). Tractatus Theologico-Politicus: (Gebhardt Edition, 1925). E.J. Brill.score: 30.0
    INTRODUCTION BRAD S. GREGORY Until now those interested in Spinoza have lacked an adequate English translation of the Tractatus Theologico-Politicus. ...
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  50. Yitzhak Y. Melamed & Michael A. Rosenthal (eds.) (2010). Spinoza's 'Theological-Political Treatise': A Critical Guide. Cambridge University Press.score: 30.0
    Machine generated contents note: List of contributors; Acknowledgements; List of abbreviations; Introduction Yitzhak Y. Melamed and Michael Rosenthal; Spinoza's exchange with Albert Burgh Edwin Curley; The text of Spinoza's Tractatus Theologico-Politicus Piet Steenbakkers; Spinoza on Ibn Ezra's Secret of the Twelve Warren Zev Harvey; Reflections of the medieval Jewish-Christian debate in the Theological-Political Treatise and the Epistles Daniel J. Lasker; The early Dutch and German reaction to the Tractatus Theologico-Politicus: foreshadowing the Enlightenment's more general Spinoza reception? Jonathan Israel; G. W. (...)
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