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  1. Friedel Weinert (unknown). Time and Invariance. Conceptus 92:55-82.
     
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  2. Friedel Weinert (2014). Lines of Descent: Kuhn and Beyond. Foundations of Science 19 (4):331-352.
    Thomas S. Kuhn is famous both for his work on the Copernican Revolution and his ‘paradigm’ view of scientific revolutions. But Kuhn later abandoned the notion of paradigm in favour of a more ‘evolutionary’ view of the history of science. Kuhn’s position therefore moved closer to ‘continuity’ models of scientific progress, for instance ‘chain-of-reasoning’ models, originally championed by D. Shapere. The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the debate around Kuhn’s new ‘developmental’ view and to evaluate these competing (...)
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  3. Friedel Weinert (2013). Space, Time and Stuff. By Arntzenius. Oxford University Press, 2012, Pp. 304, £30. ISBN: 978-0-19-969660-4. [REVIEW] Philosophy 88 (2):321-325.
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  4. Martin H. Brinkworth & Friedel Weinert (eds.) (2012/2011). Evolution 2.0: Implications of Darwinism in Philosophy and the Social and Natural Sciences. Springer.
    These essays by leading philosophers and scientists focus on recent ideas at the forefront of modern Darwinism, showcasing and exploring the challenges they raise as well as open problems.
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  5. Robert Nola & Friedel Weinert (2012). Darwinian Inferences. In Martin H. Brinkworth & Friedel Weinert (eds.), Evolution 2.0: Implications of Darwinism in Philosophy and the Social and Natural Sciences. Springer.
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  6. Friedel Weinert (2010). Relativistic Thermodynamics and the Passage of Time. Humana.Mente 13.
     
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  7. Friedel Weinert (2010). Temporal Asymmetry and Relativity1. In Jo Alyson Parker, Paul Harris & Christian Steineck (eds.), Time: Limits and Constraints. Brill. 13--109.
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  8. Friedel Weinert (2010). The Role of Probability Arguments in the History of Science. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 41 (1):95-104.
    The paper examines Wesley Salmon's claim that the primary role of plausibility arguments in the history of science is to impose constraints on the prior probability of hypotheses (in the language of Bayesian confirmation theory). A detailed look at Copernicanism and Darwinism and, more briefly, Rutherford's discovery of the atomic nucleus reveals a further and arguably more important role of plausibility arguments. It resides in the consideration of likelihoods, which state how likely a given hypothesis makes a given piece of (...)
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  9. Daniel Greenberger, Klaus Hentschel & Friedel Weinert (eds.) (2009). Compendium of Quantum Physics. Springer.
    Concepts, Experiments, History and Philosophy Daniel Greenberger, Klaus Hentschel, Friedel Weinert. 5. W. Hittorf, Ueber die Elektricit ̈atsleitung der Gase , Annalen der Physik 136, 1–31, 197–234 (1869); Engl. transl. On the Conduction of ...
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  10. Friedel Weinert (2009). Copernicus, Darwin, & Freud: Revolutions in the History and Philosophy of Science. Wiley-Blackwell.
     
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  11. Friedel Weinert (2009). Emergent Minds. Teorema: Revista Internacional de Filosofía 28 (2):189-200.
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  12. Friedel Weinert (2009). Einstein, Science and Philosophy. Philosophia Scientiae 13 (1):99-133.
    The aim of this paper is to provide a readable account of the immense philosophical legacy of Einstein’s scientific work. Einstein was not a systematic philosopher but his physical thought had philosophical consequences. In his willingness to pursue the philosophical consequences of his scientific work, Einstein followed in the footsteps of physicists like Newton, Mach, Planck and Poincaré. Einstein derived these consequences from the problem-situations, into which his work as a physicist had led him. These philosophical consequences range from metaphysics (...)
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  13. Friedel Weinert (2009). The Modern Synthesis: Einstein and Kant. Forum Philosophicum: International Journal for Philosophy 14 (2).
    The paper discusses the Kantian legacy in modern views about scientific theories. The aim of this paper is to show how Einstein's philosophy of science, which was inspired by his physics, offers a specialized version of the Kantian synthesis of Empiricism and Rationalism. In modern physical theories Kant's a priori conditions become 'constraints', as shown in Einstein's use of principle theories. Einstein's use of principle theories shows how constraints are used to steer the mapping of the rational onto the empirical (...)
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  14. Friedel Weinert, The Scientist as Philosopher.
    This paper examines how such fundamental notions as causality and determinism have undergone changes as a direct result of empirical discoveries. Although such notions are often regarded as metaphysical or a priori concepts, experimental discoveries at the beginning of this century¿radioactive decay, blackbody radiation and spontaneous emission¿led to a direct questioning of the notions of causality and determinism. Experimental evidence suggests that these two notions must be separated. Causality and indeterminism are compatible with the behavior of quantum-mechanical systems. The argument (...)
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  15. Friedel Weinert, Minkowski Space-Time and Thermodynamics.
    The purpose of this paper is twofold: a) to explore the compatibility of Minkowski’s space-time representation of the Special theory of relativity with a dynamic conception of space-time; b) to locate its roots in invariant features - like entropic relations - of the propagation of signals in space-time. From its very beginning Minkowski’s four-dimensional space-time was associated with a static view of reality, e.g. a block universe. Einstein added his influential voice to this conception when he wrote: ‘From a “happening” (...)
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  16. Friedel Weinert (2007). Physical Relativity—Space-Time Structure From a Dynamical Perspective. Philosophy 82 (03).
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  17. Friedel Weinert (2007). A Conditional View of Causality. In Federica Russo & Jon Williamson (eds.), Causality and Probability in the Sciences. 5--415.
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  18. Friedel Weinert, Invariance, Symmetries and Structural Realism.
    The paper discusses the invariance view of reality: a view inspired by the relativity and quantum theory. It is an attempt to show that both versions of Structural Realism (epistemological and ontological) are already embedded in the invariance view but in each case the invariance view introduces important modifications. From the invariance view we naturally arrive at a consideration of symmetries and structures. It is often claimed that there is a strong connection between invariance and reality, established by symmetries. The (...)
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  19. Friedel Weinert (2007). No Title Available: Reviews. Philosophy 82 (3):498-503.
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  20. Friedel Weinert (2007). Physical Relativity—Space-Time Structure From a Dynamical Perspective by Harvey Brown Perspecture Oxford University Press, 2005. Philosophy 82 (3):498-503.
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  21. Friedel Weinert, Realism and Relativity.
    The line of argument pursued in this paper is to proceed from Einstein’s fundamental problem situation to a consideration of scientific representation with respect to the Special theory of relativity (STR). Einstein’s fundamental problem situation, which is Kantian in spirit, is how the conceptual freedom of the scientist is compatible with the need for an objective representation of an independently given material world. To solve this philosophical issue Einstein employs a number of constraints, which are central to the STR. The (...)
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  22. Friedel Weinert (2006). Einstein and the Representation of Reality. Facta Philosophica 8 (1-2):229-252.
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  23. Friedel Weinert (2005). Einstein and Kant. Philosophy 80 (4):585-593.
    The paper aims to explain and illustrate why Einstein and Kant, relativity and transcendental idealism, came to be discussed in one breath after the Special theory of relativity had emerged in 1905. There are essentially three points of contact between the theory of relativity and Kant's objective idealism. The Special theory makes contact with Kantian views of time; the General theory requires a non-Kantian view of geometry; but both relativity theories endorse a quasi-Kantian view of the nature of scientific knowledge. (...)
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  24. Friedel Weinert (2005). Invariances—the Structure of the Objective World by Robert Nozick. The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2001. ??22.95. [REVIEW] Philosophy 80 (1):145-151.
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  25. Friedel Weinert (2005). The Loss of Rational Design. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 80 (56):20-.
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  26. Friedel Weinert (2004). The Scientist as Philosopher Philosophical Consequences of Great Scientific Discoveries.
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  27. Friedel Weinert (2000). Relationism and Relativity. Philosophy of Science 51:561-585.
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  28. Friedel Weinert (2000). The Construction of Atom Models: Eliminative Inductivism and its Relation to Falsificationism. Foundations of Science 5 (4):491-531.
    Falsificationism has dominated 20th century philosophy of science. It seemed to have eclipsed all forms of inductivism. Yet recent debates have revived a specific form of eliminative inductivism, the basic ideas of which go back to F. Bacon and J.S. Mill. These modern endorsements of eliminative inductivism claim to show that progressive problem solving is possible using induction, rather than falsification as a method of justification. But this common ground between falsificationism and eliminative inductivism has not led to a detailed (...)
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  29. Friedel Weinert (2000). The Comprehensibility of the World. [REVIEW] Philosophy 75 (2):296-312.
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  30. Friedel Weinert (2000). The Comprehensibility of the World by Nicholas Maxwell Clarendon Press, Oxford, XV + 316pp. On a Purported Error About the Doctrine of Double Effect: A Reply to Sophie Botros. Philosophy 75 (2):296-312.
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  31. Friedel Weinert (1999). Habermas, Science and Modernity. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 44:329-355.
    The work of Jürgen Habermas has been described as eclectic. It is also prolific. Fortunately for his readers the prolificacy and eclecticism of the author are mitigated by the recurrence of his themes. These concern the emergence and nature of modern occidental society, both from a sociological and philosophical perspective. On a more philosophical level, there is also a strong plea for a paradigm change. The philosophy of the consciousness made the lone subject, in search of knowledge, face the external (...)
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  32. Friedel Weinert (1999). Predicting the Future: An Introduction to the Theory of Forecasting by Nicholas Rescher. State University of New York Press, Albany, 1998, Pp. XI + 232. Philosophy 74 (1):122-139.
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  33. Friedel Weinert (1999). Predicting the Future: An Introduction to the Theory of Forecasting. [REVIEW] Philosophy 74 (1):122-139.
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  34. Friedel Weinert (1998). Feyerabend–Philosophy, Science and Society by John Preston. Cambridge: Polity Press, 1997, XII + 234 Pp. [REVIEW] Philosophy 73 (4):629-645.
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  35. Friedel Weinert (1998). Feyerabend–Philosophy, Science and Society. [REVIEW] Philosophy 73 (4):629-645.
     
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  36. Friedel Weinert (1997). On the Status of Social Laws. Dialectica 51 (3):225–242.
    A popular defence of the possibility of social laws is to interpret them as ceteris paribus statements along the same line as physical laws. It cannot be assumed, however, without further considerations regarding the role of initial conditions, that social laws may acquire the status of genuine laws. Two vexing problems need to be addressed: Exceptions should be compatible rather than incompatible with social regularities and social laws should not depend on initial conditions. The paper argues that neither of these (...)
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  37. Friedel Weinert (1996). Weber's Ideal Types as Models in the Social Sciences. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 41:73-93.
    There has recently been a great interest in models in the natural sciences. Models are used mainly for their representational functions: they help to concretize certain relationships between parameters in studying physical systems. For instance, we might be interested in representing how the planets orbit around the sun—a scale model of the solar system is an ideal tool for achieving this end. We are free to leave out one or two planets or ignore the moons which many of the planets (...)
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  38. Friedel Weinert (ed.) (1995). Laws of Nature: Essays on the Philosophical, Scientific and Historical Dimensions. Walter De Gruyter.
  39. Friedel Weinert (1994). The Correspondence Principle and the Closure of Theories. Erkenntnis 40 (3):303 - 323.
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  40. Friedel Weinert (1992). Vicissitudes of Laboratory Life. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 43 (3):423-429.
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  41. Friedel Weinert (1991). Introducing Events, Successful Reference and Reference-Fixing. Journal for General Philosophy of Science 22 (1):155-167.
    Summary One of the central questions concerning theories of reference has been the problem of how the reference of scientific terms gets fixed. Descriptive causal theories of reference, as discussed in this paper, have re-introduced the role of theoretical beliefs and conceptualisations in term introductions and reference-fixing. The present paper argues that the idea of reference-fixing as a dot-like event (baptism) is wrong: a number of episodes from the history of science are discussed to support the claim that reference-fixing is (...)
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  42. Friedel Weinert (1986). Nominalismus Und Gesellschaft. Journal for General Philosophy of Science 17 (2):322-345.
    Ever since the so-called linguistic revolution in philosophy, the problem of universals has become the question of whether or not abstract/general terms refer. Nominalism gives a negative answer to that question. But there is, let us say, a Continental side to nominalism which this paper sets out to explore. It examines the social consequences of a nominalist approach to questions of knowledge. In particular it looks in detail at 17th century science and Merton's scientific ethos and describes the effects of (...)
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  43. Friedel Weinert (1985). Traditionen, Diskurse, Argumente Ein Beitrag Zur Geschichte Und Struktur Philosophischer Argumentationen Über Sprache, Erkenntnis Und Wissenschaft Und Ihr Systematischer Zusammenhang.
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  44. Friedel Weinert (1984). Contra Res Sempiternas. The Monist 67 (3):376-394.
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  45. Friedel Weinert (1982). Die Arbeit der Geschichte: Ein Vergleich der Analysemodelle von Kuhn und Foucault. Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 13 (2):336-358.
    The need to rethink the history of ideas has led both Kuhn and Foucault to break away from the prevalent conception of knowledge as one of continuous growth, of accretion. It is surprising how little attention philosophers and historians of science have paid to Foucault's work, and how, consequently, the convergence between his and the Kuhnian approach has gone completely unnoticed. To see the parallels, however, and to relate their works, promises to give rise to a synthesis that might present (...)
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  46. Friedel Weinert (1982). Tradition and Argument. The Monist 65 (1):88-105.
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  47. Friedel Weinert (1980). Kontingente versus notwendige Wahrheiten und mögliche Welten bei Leibniz. Studia Leibnitiana 12:125.
    In his writings Leibniz employs both the notions of possible worlds and of necessary truths but he does not define necessary truths by reference to possible worlds. This paper is intended to show that modern attempts to interpret Leibniz's notion of necessary truth in terms of possible worlds go wrong on two accounts : 1) they disregard the consequences of Leibniz's thesis that the actual world is the best of all possible worlds and his acceptance of the scholastic principle, "What (...)
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