Search results for 'Friedericke Quack' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Karsten Weber, Uta Bittner, Arne Manzeschke, Elisabeth Rother, Friedericke Quack, Kathrin Dengler & Heiner Fangerau (2012). Taking Patient Privacy and Autonomy More Seriously: Why an Orwellian Account Is Not Sufficient. American Journal of Bioethics 12 (9):51-53.score: 240.0
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 12, Issue 9, Page 51-53, September 2012.
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  2. Angelika Berlejung, Jan Dietrich & Joachim Friedrich Quack (eds.) (2012). Menschenbilder Und Körperkonzepte Im Alten Israel, in Ägypten Und Im Alten Orient. Mohr Siebeck.score: 30.0
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  3. Marie-Laure Djelic & Sigrid Quack (2007). Overcoming Path Dependency: Path Generation in Open Systems. [REVIEW] Theory and Society 36 (2):161-186.score: 30.0
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  4. Jonathan Bolton (2011). Between the Quack and the Fanatic: Movements in Our Self-Belief. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 14 (3):281-285.score: 18.0
    Separate from the question of whether our patients believe us as doctors is the question of whether we ourselves believe in our healing ‘performances’. Borrowing from Bernard Williams’ model of truth based on the two irreducible virtues of sincerity and accuracy, this article describes a spectrum of states of self-belief, from the quack who does not believe in his acts to the fanatic who does not ‘dis-believe’, with ranges of pious fraud and bad faith in between and on either (...)
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  5. Neil Pickering (2010). Who's a Quack? Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 7 (1):43-52.score: 15.0
    Are there any characteristics by which we can reliably identify and distinguish quackery from genuine medicine? A commonly offered criterion for the distinction between medicine and quackery is science: genuine medicine is scientific; quackery is non-scientific. But it proves to be the case that at the boundary of science and non-science, there is an entanglement of considerations. Two cases are considered: that of homoeopathy and that of the Quantum Booster. In the first case, the degree to which reported phenomena that (...)
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  6. Melody J. Slashinski, Sheryl A. McCurdy, Laura S. Achenbaum, Simon N. Whitney & Amy L. McGuire (2012). “Snake-Oil,” “Quack Medicine,” and “Industrially Cultured Organisms:” Biovalue and the Commercialization of Human Microbiome Research. [REVIEW] BMC Medical Ethics 13 (1):28-.score: 15.0
    Background Continued advances in human microbiome research and technologies raise a number of ethical, legal, and social challenges. These challenges are associated not only with the conduct of the research, but also with broader implications, such as the production and distribution of commercial products promising maintenance or restoration of good physical health and disease prevention. In this article, we document several ethical, legal, and social challenges associated with the commercialization of human microbiome research, focusing particularly on how this research is (...)
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  7. J. L. Dusseau (1986). Quack-Quack-Quack: Donald Duck Dissents. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 30 (3):345-354.score: 15.0
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  8. George A. Ulett (1982). Quack‐U‐Puncture or Cure? Hastings Center Report 12 (1):45-45.score: 15.0
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  9. Philippa Martyr (2009). Quack Cocaine. Metascience 18 (3):421-422.score: 15.0
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  10. Rockney Jacobsen (2009). The Duck Quacks Back: A Reply to A. Minh Nguyen. Dialogue 48 (03):655-.score: 5.0
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  11. Harry Neumann (1971). Thinkers and Quacks: The Class Interest of the Schools. Educational Theory 21 (1):42-49.score: 5.0
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  12. Norman Gevitz (1990). Dr. Pierce's ?Golden Medical Discovery?: A ?Prince of Quacks? In the ?Queen City? [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 11 (4):163-177.score: 5.0
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  13. Ann E. Reisner (forthcoming). Martha Rosenberg: Born with a Junk Food Deficiency: How Flacks, Quacks, and Hacks Pimp the Public Health. Agriculture and Human Values.score: 5.0
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  14. Bernard T. Engel (1986). If It Looks Like a Duck, Walks Like a Duck, and Quacks Like a Duck, It is a Duck: Neurally Mediated Responses of the Circulation Are Behavior. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (2):307.score: 5.0
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  15. R. French (2009). If It Walks Like a Duck and Quacks Like a Duck... The Turing Test, Intelligence and Consciousness. In Bayne Tim, Cleeremans Axel & Wilken Patrick (eds.), The Oxford Companion to Consciousness. Oxford University Press. 461--463.score: 5.0
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  16. Dominic Murphy (2011). Dopamine and Discovery. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 18 (1):69-71.score: 3.0
    Kendler and Schaffner have written an exemplary case study of the rise of the dopamine hypothesis and, if not its fall, at least its stagnation and transmutation. They bring out well both the state of the science and the opportunities offered by the theory to consider some famous philosophical theories of scientific progress. So well, in fact, have they done this, that I do not have a lot to say about it. I will just mention one or two points that (...)
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  17. Paola Bollini & Katharina Quack‐Lötscher (2013). Guidelines‐Based Indicators to Measure Quality of Antenatal Care. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 19 (6):1060-1066.score: 3.0
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  18. Maria Rentetzi (2011). Packaging Radium, Selling Science: Boxes, Bottles and Other Mundane Things in the World of Science. Annals of Science 68 (3):375-399.score: 3.0
    Summary This article discusses the intersection of science and culture in the marketplace and explores the ways in which radium quack and medicinal products were packaged and labelled in the early twentieth century US. Although there is an interesting growing body of literature by art historians on package design, historians of science and medicine have paid little to no attention to the ways scientific and medical objects that were turned into commodities were packaged and commercialized. Thinking about packages not (...)
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  19. Claire Crignon (2013). The Debate About Methodus Medendi During the Second Half of the Seventeenth Century in England. Early Science and Medicine 18 (4):339-359.score: 2.0
  20. Rashmi Kumar, Vijay Jaiswal, Sandeep Tripathi, Akshay Kumar & M. Z. Idris (2007). Inequity in Health Care Delivery in India: The Problem of Rural Medical Practitioners. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 15 (3):223-233.score: 2.0
    A considerable section of the population in India accesses the services of individual private medical practitioners (PMPs) for primary level care. In rural areas, these providers include MBBS doctors, practitioners of alternative systems of medicine, herbalists, indigenous and folk practitioners, compounders and others. This paper describes the profile, knowledge and some practices of the rural doctor in India and then discusses the reasons for lack of equity in health care access in rural areas and possible solutions to the problem.
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  21. Susan Budd & Ursula Sharma (eds.) (1994). The Healing Bond: The Patient-Practitioner Relationship and Therapeutic Responsibility. Routledge.score: 1.0
    By considering the nature of the relationship between patient and healer, The Healing Bond explores the responsibilities of both, with a special emphasis on the therapeutic responsibility. The editors and contributors examine both orthodox and unorthodox forms of healing practice and apply a variety of professional and analytic perspectives to the medical profession as a whole. They look at specific areas of health such as midwifery, psychoanalysis, naturopathy, the relations between medicine and state, and the appeal of "quacks." Particular issues (...)
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  22. Daniel B. Klein (1994). If Government is so Villainous, How Come Government Officials Don't Seem Like Villains? Economics and Philosophy 10 (01):91-.score: 1.0
    At lunch one day a colleague and I had a friendly argument over occupational licensing. I attacked it for being anticompetitive, arguing that licensing boards raise occupational incomes by restricting entry, advertising, and commercialization. My colleague, while acknowledging anticompetitive aspects, affirmed the need for licensing on the grounds of protecting the consumer from frauds and quacks. In many areas of infrequent and specialized dealing, consumers are not able, ex ante or even ex post, to evaluate competence. I countered by suggesting (...)
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  23. Denis L. Baggi (2000). The Intelligence Left in AI. AI and Society 14 (3-4):348-378.score: 1.0
    In its forty years of existence, Artificial Intelligence has suffered both from the exaggerated claims of those who saw it as the definitive solution of an ancestral dream — that of constructing an intelligent machine-and from its detractors, who described it as the latest fad worthy of quacks. Yet AI is still alive, well and blossoming, and has left a legacy of tools and applications almost unequalled by any other field-probably because, as the heir of Renaissance thought, it represents a (...)
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  24. I. Bamforth (2002). Knock: A Study in Medical Cynicism. Medical Humanities 28 (1):14-18.score: 1.0
    French literature has shown an enduring fascination with the social figure of the doctor. In Jules Romains' amusing play Knock (1922), and in its later film version (1951), the doctor as deceiver returns to centrestage with a flourish. Molière's seventeenth-century figures were mostly quacks and mountebanks; Knock is something new: he is a health messiah. By enforcing a mental and social hygiene based on fear, Knock brings a small rural population under his sway. Insouciance is banished by artful consciousness-raising. A (...)
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  25. Helmut Renders (2011). O guia medicinal Primitive Physick de John Wesley de 1747: ciência, charlatania ou medicina social? (John Wesley's medical guide Primitive Physic[k] from 1747: science, charlatanism or social medicine?) - DOI: 10.5752/P.2175-5841.2011v9n21p339. [REVIEW] Horizonte 8 (21):339-353.score: 1.0
    Resumo Em 1747, John Wesley, spiritus rector do movimento metodista, publicou a primeira edição do seu guia medicinal Primitive Physic[k] . Qual era o seu propósito num mundo onde a academia real, herbalistas, curandeiros/as, exorcistas e charlatães competiam pela atenção da população? O artigo apresenta os diferentes grupos que atuaram, ou pretendiam atuar, em prol da saúde na Inglaterra do século 18, e compara o conteúdo do guia Primitive Physic[k] com suas propostas e estratégias terapêuticas. Conclua-se que uma parte significativa (...)
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  26. David F. Channell (1991). The Vital Machine: A Study of Technology and Organic Life. Oxford University Press.score: 1.0
    In 1738, Jacques Vaucanson unveiled his masterpiece before the court of Louis XV: a gilded copper duck that ate, drank, quacked, flapped its wings, splashed about, and, most astonishing of all, digested its food and excreted the remains. The imitation of life by technology fascinated Vaucanson's contemporaries. Today our technology is more powerful, but our fascination is tempered with apprehension. Artificial intelligence and genetic engineering, to name just two areas, raise profoundly disturbing ethical issues that undermine our most fundamental beliefs (...)
     
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