Search results for 'Friendship History' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. A. W. Price (1989). Love and Friendship in Plato and Aristotle. Oxford University Press.score: 84.0
    This book explores for the first time an idea common to both Plato and Aristotle: although people are separate, their lives need not be; one person's life may overflow into another's, so that helping someone else is a way of serving oneself. Price considers how this idea unites the philosophers' treatments of love and friendship (which are otherwise very different), and demonstrates that this view of love and friendship, applied not only to personal relationships, but also to the (...)
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  2. Lorraine Smith Pangle (2003). Aristotle and the Philosophy of Friendship. Cambridge University Press.score: 84.0
    This is the first book to offer a comprehensive account of the major philosophical works on friendship and its relationship to self-love. The book gives central place to Aristotle's searching examination of friendship in the Nicomachean Ethics. Lorraine Pangle argues that the difficulties surrounding this discussion are soon dispelled once one understands the purpose of the Ethics as both a source of practical guidance for life and a profound, theoretical investigation into human nature. The book also provides fresh (...)
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  3. Vincent Lloyd (2009). Nietzsche and Rée: A Star Friendship. By Robin Small�Friedrich Nietzsche and the Politics of History. By Christian J. Emden. [REVIEW] Heythrop Journal 50 (2):352-353.score: 72.0
  4. Ivan Illich (unknown). Philosophy ... Artifacts ... Friendship-: -And the History of the Gaze. :59-77.score: 72.0
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  5. David Marsh (1996). Reginald Hyatte, The Arts of Friendship: The Idealization of Friendship in Medieval and Early Renaissance Literature.(Brill's Studies in Intellectual History, 50.) Leiden, New York, and Cologne: EJ Brill, 1994. Pp. Xi, 249. $74.50. [REVIEW] Speculum 71 (1):159-161.score: 72.0
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  6. J. Fenterer van Vlissingen (1970). Friendship in History.(Translated From the Original Dutch Version by Bernd Jager). Humanitas 6:225.score: 72.0
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  7. Dirk Baltzly & Nick Eliopoulos (2009). The Classical Ideals of Friendship. In Barabara Caine (ed.), Friendship: a history,. Equinox.score: 60.0
    Surveys the ideals of friendship in ancient Greco-Roman philosophy. The notion of the best friendship inevitably reflects the various conceptions of a good life.
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  8. Simon May (2011). Love: A History. Yale University Press.score: 54.0
    Love plays God -- The foundation of Western love : Hebrew scripture -- From physical desire to paradise : Plato -- Love as perfect friendship : Aristotle -- Love as sexual desire : Lucretius and Ovid -- Love as the supreme virtue : Christianity -- Why Christian love isn't unconditional -- Women on top : love and the troubadours -- How human nature became loveable : from the high Middle Ages to the Renaissance -- Love as joyful understanding of (...)
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  9. Elizabeth S. Belfiore (2012). Socrates' Daimonic Art: Love for Wisdom in Four Platonic Dialogues. Cambridge University Press.score: 54.0
    Machine generated contents note: Introduction: overview of the Erotic Dialogues; Part I. Socrates and Two Young Men: 1. 'Your love and mine': Eros and self-knowledge in Alcibiades I; 2. 'In love with acquiring friends': Socrates in the Lysis; Part II. Eros and Hybris in the Symposium: Introduction to Part II: the narrators of the Symposium; 3. In praise of Eros: the speeches in the Symposium; 4. 'You are hubristic': Socrates, Alcibiades and Agathon; Part III. Love and Friendship in the (...)
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  10. Simon May (2011). Love: A Secret History. Yale University Press.score: 54.0
    Love plays God -- The foundation of Western love : Hebrew scripture -- From physical desire to paradise : Plato -- Love as perfect friendship : Aristotle -- Love as sexual desire : Lucretius and Ovid -- Love as the supreme virtue : Christianity -- Why Christian love isn't unconditional -- Women on top : love and the troubadours -- How human nature became loveable : from the high Middle Ages to the Renaissance -- Love as joyful understanding of (...)
     
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  11. Ronald Aronson (2004). Camus & Sartre: The Story of a Friendship and the Quarrel That Ended It. University of Chicago Press.score: 42.0
    Until now it has been impossible to read the full story of the relationship between Albert Camus and Jean-Paul Sartre. Their dramatic rupture at the height of the Cold War, like that conflict itself, demanded those caught in its wake to take sides rather than to appreciate its tragic complexity. Now, using newly available sources, Ronald Aronson offers the first book-length account of the twentieth century's most famous friendship and its end. Albert Camus and Jean-Paul Sartre first met in (...)
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  12. András Máté (2006). Árpád Szabó and Imre Lakatos, or the Relation Between History and Philosophy of Mathematics. Perspectives on Science 14 (3):282-301.score: 42.0
    The thirty year long friendship between Imre Lakatos and the classic scholar and historian of mathematics Árpád Szabó had a considerable influence on the ideas, scholarly career and personal life of both scholars. After recalling some relevant facts from their lives, this paper will investigate Szabó's works about the history of pre-Euclidean mathematics and its philosophy. We can find many similarities with Lakatos' philosophy of mathematics and science, both in the self-interpretation of early axiomatic Greek mathematics as Szabó (...)
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  13. Mavis Biss (2011). Aristotle on Friendship and Self-Knowledge: The Friend Beyond the Mirror. History of Philosophy Quarterly 28 (2):125.score: 42.0
    Aristotle's emphasis on sameness of character in his description of the virtuous friend as "another self" figures centrally in all his arguments for the necessity of friendship to self-knowledge. Although the attribution of the Magna Moralia to Aristotle is disputed, the comparison of the friend to a mirror in this work has encouraged many commentators to view the friend as a mirror that provides the clearest and most immediate image of one's own virtue. I will offer my own reading (...)
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  14. Paul van Tongeren (2013). Kant, Nietzsche and the Idealization of Friendship Into Nihilism. Kriterion: Revista de Filosofia 54 (128):401-417.score: 42.0
    A amizade ainda é possível em condições niilistas? Kant e Nietzsche são fases importantes na história da idealização de amizade, o que inevitavelmente conduz ao problema do niilismo. O próprio Nietzsche afirma que, por um lado, apenas algo como a amizade pode nos salvar em nossa condição niilista mas que, por outro, precisamente a amizade foi desmascarada e se tornou impossível baseada nas mesmas condições. Parece que estamos presos no paradoxo niilista de não nos ser permitido acreditar na possibilidade do (...)
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  15. Walter Pater (2010). Studies in the History of the Renaissance. OUP Oxford.score: 42.0
    'art comes to you professing frankly to give nothing but the highest quality to your moments as they pass, and simply for those moments' sake' -/- In Studies in the History of the Renaissance (1873), a diffident Oxford don produced an audacious and incalculably influential defence of aestheticism. Through his highly idiosyncratic readings of some of the finest paintings, sculptures, and poems of the French and Italian Renaissance, Pater redefined the practice of criticism as an impressionistic, almost erotic exploration (...)
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  16. Jessica Rosenfeld (2010). Ethics and Enjoyment in Late Medieval Poetry: Love After Aristotle. Cambridge University Press.score: 36.0
    Machine generated contents note: Introduction: love after Aristotle; 1. Enjoyment: a medieval history; 2. Narcissus after Aristotle: love and ethics in Le Roman de la Rose; 3. Metamorphoses of pleasure in the fourteenth century Dit Amoureux; 4. Love's knowledge: fabliau, allegory, and fourteenth-century anti-intellectualism; 5. On human happiness: Dante, Chaucer, and the felicity of friendship; Coda: Chaucer's philosophical women.
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  17. Robert Blanchet & Margrethe Bruun Vaage (2012). Don, Peggy, and Other Fictional Friends? Engaging with Characters in Television Series. Projections 6 (2):18-41.score: 36.0
    As the frequent use of metaphors like friendship or relationship in academic and colloquial discourse on serial television suggests, long-term narratives seem to add something to the spectator's engagement with fictional characters that is not fully captured by terms such as empathy and sympathy. Drawing on philosophical accounts of friendship and psychological theories on the formation of close relationships, this article clarifies in what respect the friendship metaphor is warranted. The article proposes several hypotheses that will enhance (...)
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  18. Rubén Darío Maldonado (2011). Is still fashionable nowadays to to ask why Satre and Camus fought. [Spanish]. Eidos 7:160-171.score: 36.0
    Normal 0 21 false false false ES X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Tabla normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} This is a reflection on the degradation of the human protest, with terrorism promoting it as a legitímate trategy to obtain “political results”. Such a reflection is done from the update of the conceptual and political referents (...)
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  19. Sean McAleer (2013). Friendship, Perception, and Referential Opacity in Nicomachean Ethics IX.9. Logical Analysis and History of Philosophy 16:362-374.score: 36.0
    This essay reconstructs and evaluates Aristotle's argument in Nicomachean Ethics IX.9 that the happy person needs friends, in which Aristotle combines his well-known claim that friends are other selves with the claim that human perception is meta-perceptual: the perceiving subject perceives its own existence. After exploring some issues in the logic of perception, the essay argues that Aristotle's argument for the necessity of friends is invalid since perception-verbs create referentially opaque contexts in which the substitution of co-referential terms fails.
     
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  20. Daniel N. Robinson (2004). The Great Ideas of Philosophy. Teaching Co..score: 36.0
    From the Upanishads to Homer -- Philosophy, did the Greeks invent it -- Pythagoras and the divinity of number -- What is there? -- The Greek tragedians on man's fate -- Herodotus and the lamp of history -- Socrates on the examined life -- Plato's search for truth -- Can virtue be taught? -- Plato's Republic, man writ large -- Hippocrates and the science of life -- Aristotle on the knowable -- Aristotle on friendship -- Aristotle on the (...)
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  21. Lauren Swayne Barthold (2010). Friendship and the Ethics of Understanding. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 14 (2):417-429.score: 30.0
    In the following essay I explore the hermeneutical significance of Gadamer’s writings on the relational, and thus ethical, components of understanding. First, I look at his discussion in Truth and Method of the significance of the “I-Thou” relation for interpretation. I then turn to his 1985 essay on Aristotle’s notion of friendship, “Friendship and Self-Knowledge: Reflections on the Role of Friendship in Greek Ethics.” My interest is to think about the implications of these writings for his theory (...)
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  22. Lisa Hill & Peter McCarthy (2004). On Friendship and Necessitudo in Adam Smith. History of the Human Sciences 17 (4):1-16.score: 30.0
    Adam Smith (1723–90) provided a novel and subtle account of the new social physics that emerged to accommodate the economic changes taking place in his time. This article explores Smith’s views on the effect of commercialization on friendship, and then questions one prominent interpretation of his approach, that of Allan Silver. Against the contested reading, we argue that the new ‘strangership’ described by Smith is not warm, but rather, cool-friendship enhancing. We suggest that Cicero’s treatment of friendship (...)
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  23. C. D. A. Leighton (2012). Thomas Allies, John Henry Newman and Providentialist History. History of European Ideas 38 (2):248-265.score: 30.0
    Summary This article discusses and evaluates the historiographical work of a leading Oxford convert and Ultramontane, Thomas Allies (1813?1903). An evaluation of Allies by the criteria of the Ultramontane scholarship he endeavoured to practise allows the article to offer an illustration of the difficulty in establishing and maintaining an autonomous Catholic scholarship during the nineteenth century's secularising development of academic activity. It also allows substantial description of the patterns of nineteenth-century Catholic historical thought, noting the strength of its commitment to (...)
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  24. D. Schroeder (1992). Aristotle on the Good of Virtue-Friendship. History of Political Thought 13 (2):203-218.score: 30.0
    Aristotle's well-known divisions of friendship, those based on utility, pleasure and virtue, are based on the kind of good each provides. It is fairly easy to see what is contributed by utility- and pleasure-friendships, but virtue-friendship presents a special difficulty. Aristotle writes that virtue-friendship occurs between good (virtuous) persons, each of whom is happy because of that goodness. Aristotle also asserts, however, that the good (happy) person, especially the philosopher, is largely self-sufficient, needing little in the way (...)
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  25. Sharon M. Kaye (2004). Why the Liberty of Indifference Is Worth Wanting: Buridan's Ass, Friendship, and Peter John Olivi. History of Philosophy Quarterly 21 (1):21 - 42.score: 24.0
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  26. David Wolfsdorf (2008). Trials of Reason: Plato and the Crafting of Philosophy. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    Interpretation -- Introduction -- Interpreting Plato -- The political culture of Plato's early dialogues -- Dialogue -- Character and history -- The mouthpiece principle -- Forms of evidence -- Desire -- Socrates and eros -- The subjectivist conception of desire -- Instrumental and terminal desire -- Rational and irrational desires -- Desire in the critique of Akrasia -- Interpreting Lysis -- The deficiency conception of desire -- Inauthentic friendship -- Platonic desire -- Antiphilosophical desires -- Knowledge -- Excellence (...)
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  27. David K. O'Connor (1990). Two Ideals of Friendship. History of Philosophy Quarterly 7 (2):109 - 122.score: 24.0
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  28. Robert Wuthnow (2004). "The Religious Factor" Revisited. Sociological Theory 22 (2):205-218.score: 24.0
    Four decades have passed since the publication of Gerhard Lenski's "The Religious Factor". While generally regarded as a classic in the sociology of religion, the book has had a curious history, largely because of the interest it generated in differences between Protestants and Catholics. In this paper I provide an alternative reading of The Religious Factor's impact on sociology of religion that points to its larger theoretical implications. I argue that the book should be understood in relation to continuing (...)
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  29. Massimo Pigliucci (2012). Answers for Aristotle: How Science and Philosophy Can Lead Us to A More Meaningful Life. Basic Books.score: 24.0
    How should we live? According to philosopher and biologist Massimo Pigliucci, the greatest guidance to this essential question lies in combining the wisdom of 24 centuries of philosophy with the latest research from 21st century science. In Answers for Aristotle, Pigliucci argues that the combination of science and philosophy first pioneered by Aristotle offers us the best possible tool for understanding the world and ourselves. As Aristotle knew, each mode of thought has the power to clarify the other: science provides (...)
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  30. Niall Bond (2010). Ferdinand Tönnies and Friedrich Paulsen: Conciliatory Iconoclasts. The European Legacy 15 (1):35-53.score: 24.0
    Ferdinand T nnies' Gemeinschaft und Gesellschaft, a work of global import and condensate of the history of ideas, was much influenced by the philosopher Friedrich Paulsen. The study of their friendship shows how these intellectuals chose to adopt and adapt paradigms of the European legacy—rationalism and empiricism on the one hand, rationalism and romantic historicism on the other—in achieving creative idiosyncratic syntheses of idealistic monism. Beyond the shared scientific agenda of monism, they were convinced of the vocation of (...)
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  31. Alvin M. Saperstein (1994). Mathematical Modeling of the Effects of 'Capability' and 'Intent' on the Stability of a Competitive International System. Synthese 100 (3):359 - 378.score: 24.0
    In international relations theory, there is a long history of Richardson-like modeling of the evolution of military capability. Usually, such models are deterministic and predictive and do not allow for the representation of the transition from competitive peace to shooting war. More recently, models have been developed which attempt to represent the evolution of relationship between nations. The relationship between nations, varying from friendship to hostility, is taken to be synonymous with the intent of nations towards each other, (...)
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  32. Jennifer Hart Weed (2009). Aquinas on Friendship (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 47 (1):pp. 136-137.score: 24.0
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  33. Leonid Zhmud (1998). Plato as "Architect of Science". Phronesis 43 (3):211-244.score: 24.0
    The figure of the cordial host of the Academy, who invited the most gifted mathematicians and cultivated pure research, whose keen intellect was able if not to solve the particular problem then at least to show the method for its solution: this figure is quite familiar to students of Greek science. But was the Academy as such a center of scientific research, and did Plato really set for mathematicians and astronomers the problems they should study and methods they should use? (...)
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  34. Daw-Nay N. R. Evans (2006). Nietzsche and Rée: A Star Friendship (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 44 (4):672-673.score: 24.0
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  35. Elena Irrera (2005). Between Advantage and Virtue: Aristotle's Theory of Political Friendship. History of Political Thought 26 (4):565.score: 24.0
  36. Adriaan Theodoor Peperzak (2012). Thinking About Thinking: What Kind of Conversation is Philosophy? Fordham University Press.score: 24.0
    That we are a conversation -- On the unity of thematic philosophy and philosophy as history of thought -- The relevance of intersubjectivity for first philosophy and the history of philosophy -- Education: responsive tradition -- Philosophy: wise about friendship? -- Vocative -- Philosophy versus faith? -- The universality of a Christian philosophy -- Sacrificium laudis, sacrificium intellectus -- Philosophy as mediation between faith and culture.
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  37. L. Zhmud (1998). Plato as "Architect of Science". Phronesis 43 (3):211 - 244.score: 24.0
    The figure of the cordial host of the Academy, who invited the most gifted mathematicians and cultivated pure research, whose keen intellect was able if not to solve the particular problem then at least to show the method for its solution: this figure is quite familiar to students of Greek science. But was the Academy as such a center of scientific research, and did Plato really set for mathematicians and astronomers the problems they should study and methods they should use? (...)
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  38. K. Bonner (forthcoming). Principles, Dialectic and the Common World of Friendship: Socrates and Crito in Conversation. History of the Human Sciences.score: 24.0
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  39. Jennifer Hart Weed (2008). Aquinas on Friendship (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 47 (1):136-137.score: 24.0
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  40. Jakub Jinek (2011). Přátelství, dobro, polis. K významu přátelství v celku Aristotelovy praktické filosofie. Studia Neoaristotelica 8 (1):72-94.score: 24.0
    Aristotle’s subtle distinction between the forms of friendship and his concept of loving friend as one’s other self propose a solution to the fundamental objection to any eudaimonian theory of slavery, namely that friendship – as basically non-moral phenomenon – is but an egoistic device of one’s happy life. Aristotelian theorems are based on his concept of analogy and on a philosophically specific notion of “self”. Since both of these are rooted in Platonism, Aristotle has toevolve them dialectically (...)
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  41. Nathan Lefler (2012). Uncommon Friendships: An Amicable History of Modern Religious Thought–By William W. Young III. Modern Theology 28 (1):145-147.score: 24.0
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  42. Sasha Ross (2012). The Prescience of the Untimely: A Review of Arab Spring, Libyan Winter by Vijay Prashad. [REVIEW] Continent 2 (3):218-223.score: 24.0
    continent. 2.3 (2012): 218–223 Vijay Prashad. Arab Spring, Libyan Winter . Oakland: AK Press. 2012. 271pp, pbk. $14.95 ISBN-13: 978-1849351126. Nearly a decade ago, I sat in a class entitled, quite simply, “Corporations,” taught by Vijay Prashad at Trinity College. Over the course of the semester, I was amazed at the extent of Prashad’s knowledge, and the complexity and erudition of his style. He has since authored a number of classic books that have gained recognition throughout the world. The Darker (...)
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  43. Walter Biemel (2004). Erinnerungen an Dragomir. Studia Phaenomenologica 4 (3-4):13-15.score: 24.0
    This short autobiographical text evokes the atmosphere of the years which marked the beginning of my friendship with Alexandru Dragomir: i.e. our student years in Bucharest, the circle of Romanian students studying in the 40s in Freiburg i. Br. and the intellectual intensity of Martin Heidegger’s seminars and courses, which influenced both of us for the rest of our lives. From the 15 members of Heidegger’s Oberseminar (dedicated in this period to Hegel’s Phenomenology of Spirit), three were from Romania: (...)
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  44. J. H. Weed (forthcoming). Aquinas on Friendship. Oxford-New York: Oxford University Press. Journal of the History of Philosophy.score: 24.0
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  45. Bart Schultz (2002). Eye of the Universe: Henry Sidgwick and the Problem Public. Utilitas 14 (02):155-.score: 24.0
    Henry Sidgwick has gone down in the history of philosophy as both the great, classical utilitarian moral theorist who authored The Methods of Ethics, and an outstanding exemplar of intellectual honesty and integrity, one whose personal virtues were inseparable from his philosophical strengths and method. Yet this construction of Sidgwick the philosopher has been based on a too limited understanding of Sidgwick's casuistry and leading practical ethical concerns. As his friendship with John Addington Symonds reveals, Sidgwick was deeply (...)
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  46. John Bussanich (1991). Love and Friendship in Plato and Aristotle (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 29 (4):667-669.score: 24.0
  47. Yi Zhuxian (2004). The Eternal Friendship Between Hu Shi and Chen Hengzhe. Chinese Studies in History 37 (3):66-86.score: 24.0
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  48. Janet M. Burke (1989). Freemasonry, Friendship and Noblewomen: The Role of the Secret Society in Bringing Enlightenment Thought to Pre-Revolutionary Women Elites. History of European Ideas 10 (3):283-293.score: 24.0
  49. Samuel K. Cohn (1999). Michael Rocke, Forbidden Friendships: Homosexuality and Male Culture in Renaissance Florence.(Studies in the History of Sexuality.) New York and Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1996. Pp. X, 371; Black-and-White Figures and Tables. $35. [REVIEW] Speculum 74 (2):481-483.score: 24.0
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  50. Gerard Delanty (ed.) (2004). Theodor W. Adorno. Sage.score: 24.0
    Theodor W.Adorno was one of the towering intellectuals of the twentieth century. His contributions cover such a myriad of fields, including the sociology of culture, social theory, the philosophy of music, ethics, art and aesthetics, film, ideology, the critique of modernity and musical composition, that it is difficult to assimilate the sheer range and profundity of his achievement. His celebrated friendship with Walter Benjamin has produced some of the most moving and insightful correspondence on the origins and objects of (...)
     
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