Search results for 'Fur trade' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Alan Herscovici (1985/1991). Second Nature: The Animal-Rights Controversy. Stoddart.score: 60.0
  2. Ros Clubb (2006). The Welfare of Animals Bred for Their Fur in China. In Jacky Turner & Joyce D'Silva (eds.), Animals, Ethics, and Trade: The Challenge of Animal Sentience. Earthscan. 180.score: 36.0
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  3. Sandro Castaldo, Francesco Perrini, Nicola Misani & Antonio Tencati (2009). The Missing Link Between Corporate Social Responsibility and Consumer Trust: The Case of Fair Trade Products. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 84 (1):1 - 15.score: 24.0
    This paper investigates the link between the consumer perception that a company is socially oriented and the consumer intention to buy products marketed by that company. We suggest that this link exists when at least two conditions prevail: (1) the products sold by that company comply with ethical and social requirements; (2) the company has an acknowledged commitment to protect consumer rights and interests. To test these hypotheses, we conducted a survey among the clients of retail chains offering Fair (...) products. The results show that socially oriented companies can successfully leverage their reputation to market products with high symbolic values. (shrink)
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  4. Valéry Bezençon & Sam Blili (2009). Fair Trade Managerial Practices: Strategy, Organisation and Engagement. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 90 (1):95 - 113.score: 24.0
    The number of distributors selling Fair Trade products is constantly increasing. What are their motivations to distribute Fair Trade products? How do they organise this distribution? Do they apply and communicate the Fair Trade values? This research, based on five case studies in Switzerland, aims at understanding and structuring the strategies and the managerial practices related to Fair Trade product distribution, as well as analysing if they denote an engagement with Fair Trade principles. The results (...)
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  5. Casey Humbyrd (2009). Fair Trade International Surrogacy. Developing World Bioethics 9 (3):111-118.score: 24.0
    Since the development of assisted reproductive technologies, infertile individuals have crossed borders to obtain treatments unavailable or unaffordable in their own country. Recent media coverage has focused on the outsourcing of surrogacy to developing countries, where the cost for surrogacy is significantly less than the equivalent cost in a more developed country. This paper discusses the ethical arguments against international surrogacy. The major opposition viewpoints can be broadly divided into arguments about welfare, commodification and exploitation. It is argued that the (...)
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  6. Gavin Fridell (2009). The Co-Operative and the Corporation: Competing Visions of the Future of Fair Trade. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 86 (1):81 - 95.score: 24.0
    This paper provides an analysis of the fair trade network in the North through a comparative assessment of two distinctly different fair trade certified roasters: Planet Bean, a worker-owned co-operative in Guelph, Ontario; and Starbucks Coffee Company, the world's largest specialty roaster. The two organizations are assessed on the basis of their distinct visions of the fair trade mission and their understandings of "consumer sovereignty". It is concluded that the objectives of Planet Bean are more compatible with (...)
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  7. Joni Valkila, Pertti Haaparanta & Niina Niemi (2010). Empowering Coffee Traders? The Coffee Value Chain From Nicaraguan Fair Trade Farmers to Finnish Consumers. Journal of Business Ethics 97 (2):257 - 270.score: 24.0
    This article analyzes the distribution of benefits from Fair Trade between producing and consuming countries. Fair Trade and conventional coffee production and trade were examined in Nicaragua in 2005-2006 and 2008. Consumption of the respective coffees was assessed in Finland in 2006-2009. The results indicate that consumers paid considerably more for Fair Trade-certified coffee than for the other alternatives available. Although Fair Trade provided price premiums to producer organizations, a larger share of the retail prices (...)
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  8. Axel Gelfert (2013). Strategies of Model-Building in Condensed Matter Physics: Trade-Offs as a Demarcation Criterion Between Physics and Biology? Synthese 190 (2):253-272.score: 24.0
    This paper contrasts and compares strategies of model-building in condensed matter physics and biology, with respect to their alleged unequal susceptibility to trade-offs between different theoretical desiderata. It challenges the view, often expressed in the philosophical literature on trade-offs in population biology, that the existence of systematic trade-offs is a feature that is specific to biological models, since unlike physics, biology studies evolved systems that exhibit considerable natural variability. By contrast, I argue that the development of ever (...)
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  9. Darryl Reed (2009). What Do Corporations Have to Do with Fair Trade? Positive and Normative Analysis From a Value Chain Perspective. Journal of Business Ethics 86 (1):3 - 26.score: 24.0
    There has been tremendous growth in the sales of certified fair trade products since the introduction of the first of these goods in the Netherlands in 1988. Many would argue that this rapid growth has been due in large part to the increasing involvement of corporations. Still, participation by corporations in fair trade has not been welcomed by all. The basic point of contention is that, while corporate participation has the potential to rapidly extend the market for fair (...)
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  10. Gavin Fridell (2004). The University and the Moral Imperative of Fair Trade Coffee. Journal of Academic Ethics 2 (1):141-159.score: 24.0
    This paper examines the relationship between the university and fair trade coffee campaigns in North America. In recent years, fair trade coffee sales internationally have increased substantially but have still not grown large enough to meet the needs of fair trade producers in the South. In consequence, fair trade activists have sought to expand the market by pressuring public institutions to adopt fair trade purchasing policies. In North America, the university has emerged as a central (...)
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  11. Caroline Josephine Doran (2009). The Role of Personal Values in Fair Trade Consumption. Journal of Business Ethics 84 (4):549 - 563.score: 24.0
    Research in the U. S. on fair trade consumption is sparse. Therefore, little is known as to what motivates U. S. consumers to buy fair trade products. This study sought to determine which values are salient to American fair trade consumption. The data were gathered via a Web-based version of the Schwartz Value Survey (SVS) and were gleaned from actual consumers who purchase fair trade products from a range of Internet-based fair trade retailers. This study (...)
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  12. Nicole Hassoun (2011). Free Trade, Poverty, and Inequality. Journal of Moral Philosophy 8 (1):5-44.score: 24.0
    Anyone familiar with The Economist knows the mantra: Free trade will ameliorate poverty by increasing growth and reducing inequality. This paper suggests that problems underlying measurement of poverty, inequality, and free trade provide reason to worry about this argument. Furthermore, the paper suggests that better evidence is necessary to establish that free trade is causing inequality and poverty to fall. Experimental studies usually provide the best evidence of causation. So, the paper concludes with a call for further (...)
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  13. Francisco VanderHoff Boersma (2009). The Urgency and Necessity of a Different Type of Market: The Perspective of Producers Organized Within the Fair Trade Market. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 86 (1):51 - 61.score: 24.0
    The development of the certified Fair Trade market was initiated by a group of indigenous communities in Mexico. Over time, their vision of Fair Trade as a different type of market has become increasingly marginalized by an emphasis on poverty reduction. This article presents their understanding of what Fair Trade should and should not be. It presents the key principles of the Fair Trade market as effectiveness, ecological sustainability, social sustainability, and more direct producer-consumer relationships. The (...)
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  14. Geoff Moore (2004). The Fair Trade Movement: Parameters, Issues and Future Research. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 53 (1-2):73-86.score: 24.0
    Although Fair Trade has been in existence for more than 40 years, discussion in the business and business ethics literature of this unique trading and campaigning movement between Southern producers and Northern buyers and consumers has been limited. This paper seeks to redress this deficit by providing a description of the characteristics of Fair Trade, including definitional issues, market size and segmentation and the key organizations. It discusses Fair Trade from Southern producer and Northern trader and consumer (...)
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  15. John Matthewson (2011). Trade-Offs in Model-Building: A More Target-Oriented Approach. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science 42 (2):324-333.score: 24.0
    In his 1966 paper "The Strategy of model-building in Population Biology", Richard Levins argues that no single model in population biology can be maximally realistic, precise and general at the same time. This is because these desirable model properties trade-off against one another. Recently, philosophers have developed Levins' claims, arguing that trade-offs between these desiderata are generated by practical limitations on scientists, or due to formal aspects of models and how they represent the world. However this project is (...)
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  16. Iain A. Davies, Bob Doherty & Simon Knox (2010). The Rise and Stall of a Fair Trade Pioneer: The Cafédirect Story. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 92 (1):127 - 147.score: 24.0
    This is a case study investigating the growth of fair trade pioneer, Cafédirect. We explore the growth of the company and develop strategic insights on how Cafédirect has attained its prominent position in the UK mainstream coffee industry based on its ethical positioning. We explore the marketing, networks and communications channels of the brand which have led to rapid growth from niche player to a mainstream brand. However, the company is experiencing a slow down in its meteoric rise and (...)
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  17. Karla Utting (2009). Assessing the Impact of Fair Trade Coffee: Towards an Integrative Framework. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 86 (1):127 - 149.score: 24.0
    This article presents an impact assessment framework that allows for the evaluation of positive and negative local-level impacts that have resulted from "responsible trade" interventions such as fair trade and ethical trade. The framework investigates impact relating to (1) livelihood impacts on primary stakeholders; (2) socio-economic impacts on communities; (3) organizational impacts; (4) environmental impacts; (5) policies and institutional impacts; and (6) future prospects. It identifies relevant local-level stakeholders and facilitates the analysis of conflicting interests. The framework (...)
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  18. Adina Preda (2011). Rights Enforcement, Trade-Offs, and Pluralism. Res Publica 17 (3):227-243.score: 24.0
    This paper asks whether (human) rights enforcement is permissible given that it may entail infringing on the rights of innocent bystanders. I consider two strategies that adopt a rights-sensitive consequentialist framework and offer a positive answer to this question, namely Amartya Sen’s and Hillel Steiner’s. Against Sen, I argue that trade-offs between rights are problematic since they contradict the purpose of rights, which is to provide a pluralist solution to disagreement about values, i.e. to allow agents to act in (...)
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  19. Veronika A. Andorfer & Ulf Liebe (2012). Research on Fair Trade Consumption—A Review. Journal of Business Ethics 106 (4):415-435.score: 24.0
    An overview and assessment of the current state of research on individual consumption of Fair Trade (FT) products is given on the basis of 51 journal publications. Arranging this field of ethical consumption research according to key research objectives, theoretical approaches, methods, and study population, the review suggests that most studies apply social psychological approaches focusing mainly on consumer attitudes. Fewer studies draw on economic approaches focusing on consumers’ willingness to pay ethical premia for FT products or sociological approaches (...)
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  20. Patrick De Pelsmacker & Wim Janssens (2007). A Model for Fair Trade Buying Behaviour: The Role of Perceived Quantity and Quality of Information and of Product-Specific Attitudes. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 75 (4):361-380.score: 24.0
    In a sample of 615 Belgians a model for fair trade buying behaviour was developed. The impact of fair trade knowledge, general attitudes towards fair trade, attitudes towards fair trade products, and the perception of the quality and quantity of fair trade information on the reported amount of money spent on fair trade products were assessed. Fair trade knowledge, overall concern and scepticism towards fair trade, and the perception of the perceived quantity (...)
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  21. Robert A. Rice (2001). Noble Goals and Challenging Terrain: Organic and Fair Trade Coffee Movements in the Global Marketplace. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 14 (1):39-66.score: 24.0
    Social relations associated with conventional agricultural exports find their origins in long term associations based on business, family, and class alliances. Working outside these boundaries presents a host of challenges, especially where small producers with little economic or political power are concerned. Yet, in many developing countries, alternative trade organizations (ATOs) based on philosophies of social justice and/or environmental well-being are carving out spaces alongside traditional agricultural export sectors by establishing new channels of trade and marketing. Coffee provides (...)
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  22. Herbert Casteran (2010). Do Ethical Values Work? A Quantitative Study of the Impact of Fair Trade Coffee on Consumer Behavior. Journal of Business Ethics 97 (4):613 - 624.score: 24.0
    This study investigates the large French fair trade (FT) market and the importance of FT coffee within it, in an attempt to identify some general features of FT consumers. On the basis of 7,587 transactions, the authors abo determine the impact of FT characteristics on customer behavior. The main result is somewhat surprising: FT coffee purchases seem to involve a temporary commitment as FT coffee consumers appear less loyal than traditional coffee consumers. The authors derive some business and academic (...)
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  23. Anil Hira & Jared Ferrie (2006). Fair Trade: Three Key Challenges for Reaching the Mainstream. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 63 (2):107 - 118.score: 24.0
    After nearly 20 years of work by activists, fair trade, a movement establishing alternative trading organizations to ensure minimal returns, safe working conditions, and environmentally sustainable production, is now gaining steam, with increasing awareness and availability across a variety of products. However, this article addresses several major remaining challenges: (a) a lack of agreement about what fair trade really means and how it should be certified; (b) uneven awareness and availability across different areas, with marked differences between some (...)
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  24. Corinne Gendron, Véronique Bisaillon & Ana Isabel Otero Rance (2009). The Institutionalization of Fair Trade: More Than Just a Degraded Form of Social Action. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 86 (1):63 - 79.score: 24.0
    The context of economic globalization has contributed to the emergence of a new form of social action which has spread into the economic sphere in the form of the new social economic movements. The emblematic figure of this new generation of social movements is fair trade, which influences the economy towards political or social ends. Having emerged from multiple alternative trade practices, fair trade has gradually become institutionalized since the professionalization of World Shops, the arrival of fair (...)
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  25. Andreas Chatzidakis, Sally Hibbert & Andrew P. Smith (2007). Why People Don't Take Their Concerns About Fair Trade to the Supermarket: The Role of Neutralisation. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 74 (1):89 - 100.score: 24.0
    This article explores how neutralisation can explain people's lack of commitment to buying Fair Trade (FT) products, even when they identify FT as an ethical concern. It examines the theoretical tenets of neutralisation theory and critically assesses its applicability to the purchase of FT products. Exploratory research provides illustrative examples of neutralisation techniques being used in the FT consumer context. A conceptual framework and research propositions delineate the role of neutralisation in explaining the attitude-behaviour discrepancies evident in relation to (...)
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  26. Iain A. Davies & Andrew Crane (2003). Ethical Decision Making in Fair Trade Companies. Journal of Business Ethics 45 (1-2):79 - 92.score: 24.0
    This paper reports on a study of ethical decision-making in a fair trade company. This can be seen to be a crucial arena for investigation since fair trade firms not only have a specific ethical mission in terms of helping growers out of poverty, but they tend to be perceived as (and are often marketed on the basis of) having an "ethical" image. Eschewing a straightforward test of extant ethical decision models, we adopt Thompson''s proposal for a more (...)
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  27. Patricia J. Arnold & Terrie C. Reeves (2006). International Trade and Health Policy: Implications of the GATS for US Healthcare Reform. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 63 (4):313 - 332.score: 24.0
    This paper examines the implications of the General Agreement on Trade in Services (GATS), the World Trade Organization’s agreement governing trade in health-related services, for health policy and healthcare reform in the United States. The paper describes the nature and scope of US obligations under the GATS, the ways in which the trade agreement intersects with domestic health policy, and the institutional factors that mediate trade-offs between health and trade policy. The analysis suggests that (...)
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  28. Mariëlle Matthee & Dominique Vermersch (2000). Are the Precautionary Principle and the International Trade of Genetically Modified Organisms Reconcilable? Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 12 (1):59-70.score: 24.0
    This paper seeks to find possibilities forreconciliation of the implementation of theprecautionary principle and the promotion ofinternational trade of genetically modified organisms,based on the assumption that a sustainabledevelopment is a right objective to strive for. Itstarts with an explanation of the background and therole of the precautionary principle, and describes inwhat way measures based on the precautionary principlecan easily lead to the creation of trade barriers. Thearticle then examines to what extent the WTO (WorldTrade Organisation) Agreements allow theimplementation (...)
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  29. Jesús Alvarado (2009). Fair Trade in Mexico and Abroad: An Alternative to the Walmartopia? [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 88 (2):301 - 317.score: 24.0
    Fair trade is an ethical alternative to neoliberal market practices. This article examines the development of the fair trade movement, both in Mexico and abroad, beginning with the experience of UCIRI (Unión de Comunidades Indígenas de la Región del Istmo – Union of Indigenous Communities of the Isthmus Region), an association of small coffee growers in Mexico and a main actor in the creation of the first fair trade seal in the world, Max Havelaar, in 1988. Future (...)
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  30. Luc K. Audebrand & Thierry C. Pauchant (2009). Can the Fair Trade Movement Enrich Traditional Business Ethics? An Historical Study of its Founders in Mexico. Journal of Business Ethics 87 (3):343 - 353.score: 24.0
    As the need for more diversity in business ethics is becoming more pressing in our global world, we provide an historical study of a Fair Trade (FT) movement, born in rural Mexico. We first focus on the basic assumptions of its founders, which include a worker–priest, Frans van der Hoff, a group of native Indians and local farmers who formed a cooperative, and an NGO, Max Havelaar. We then review both the originalities and challenges of the FT movement and (...)
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  31. Tierney Bondy & Vishal Talwar (2011). Through Thick and Thin: How Fair Trade Consumers Have Reacted to the Global Economic Recession. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 101 (3):365-383.score: 24.0
    Research on fair trade has flourished over the past decade as fair trade food products have gained popularity amongst consumers in many developed economies. This study examines the effects of recessionary economic conditions on fair trade consumers’ purchasing behaviour. An online survey was administered to 306 fair trade consumers from Canada, the United Kingdom and the United States of America. The results reveal a discrepancy among fair trade consumers as only consumers that purchase fair (...) on an occasional basis adhered to established consumer behaviour norms, i.e. decreasing their purchases of fair trade products and becoming significantly more price aware. Respondents who actively consume fair trade generally remained loyal to their purchase. While some active consumers altered their purchasing behaviour, this phenomenon was not common amongst this group as no statistically significant changes were observed. Differences were also noted among the three countries as the Canadian and US fair trade consumers significantly decreased their consumption of fair trade as a result of the recession, whereas the UK consumers did not. In addition to the research results, theoretical and managerial implications will be discussed along with future research directions. (shrink)
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  32. Will Low & Eileen Davenport (2009). Organizational Leadership, Ethics and the Challenges of Marketing Fair and Ethical Trade. Journal of Business Ethics 86 (1):97 - 108.score: 24.0
    This article critically evaluates current developments in marketing fair trade labelled products and "no sweat" manufactured goods, and argues that both the fair trade and ethical trade movements increasingly rely on strategies for bottom-up change, converting consumers "one cup at a time". This individualistic approach, which we call "shopping for a better world", must, we argue, be augmented by more collectivist approaches to affect transformative change. Specifically, we look at the concept of mission-driven organizations pursuing leadership roles (...)
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  33. Debora C. Randall (2005). An Exploration of Opportunities for the Growth of the Fair Trade Market: Three Cases of Craft Organisations. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 56 (1):55 - 67.score: 24.0
    Businesses that maintain ethical standards have an advantage in the marketplace based on the increasing interest of consumers in products that have a social and ethical component. Fair trade organisations that adopt environmental, social and ethical principles in trading are in a good position to make the most of this growing interest in the market. However, it is unclear whether fair trade organisations are taking full advantage of emerging market opportunities for ethically traded products. This research explores this (...)
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  34. J. J. McMurtry (2009). Ethical Value-Added: Fair Trade and the Case of Café Femenino. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 86 (1):27 - 49.score: 24.0
    This article engages various critiques of Fair Trade, from its participation in commodification to providing a cover for "Fair-washing" corporations, and argues that Fair Trade has the potential to answer the challenges contained within them if and when it initiates an ongoing process of developing the "ethical valuedadded" content of the label. This argument is made in a number of ways. First, by distinguishing between economic and human development impacts and ethics, this article argues that these impacts are (...)
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  35. Kimberly K. Smith (2009). A Pluralist–Expressivist Critique of the Pet Trade. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 22 (3):241-256.score: 24.0
    Elizabeth Anderson’s “pluralist–expressivist” value theory, an alternative to the understanding of value and rationality underlying the “rational actor” model of human behavior, provides rich resources for addressing questions of environmental and animal ethics. It is particularly well-suited to help us think about the ethics of commodification, as I demonstrate in this critique of the pet trade. I argue that Anderson’s approach identifies the proper grounds for criticizing the commodification of animals, and directs our attention to the importance of maintaining (...)
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  36. Christian Barry (forthcoming). The Regulation of Harm in International Trade. Canadian Journal of Philosophy:1-9.score: 24.0
    In his important recent work on global economic integration, Aaron James has defended a principle—Collective Due Care—for determining when a form of economic integration is morally objectionable because it causes unjustified harm (including unemployment, wage suppression, and diminished working conditions). This essay argues that Collective Due Care would yield implausible judgments about trade practices and would be too indeterminate to play the practical role for which it is intended.
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  37. Leonardo Becchetti & Benjamin Huybrechts (2008). The Dynamics of Fair Trade as a Mixed-Form Market. Journal of Business Ethics 81 (4):733 - 750.score: 24.0
    This article analyses the Fair Trade sector as a “mixed-form market,” i.e., a market in which different types of players (in this case, nonprofit, co-operative and for-profit organizations) coexist and compete. The purposes of this article are (1) to understand the factors that have led Fair Trade to become a mixed-form market and (2) to propose some trails to understand the market dynamics that result from the interactions between the different types of players. We start by defining briefly (...)
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  38. Caroline Josephine Doran (2010). Fair Trade Consumption: In Support of the Out-Group. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 95 (4):527 - 541.score: 24.0
    Two sets of self-transcendence values -universalism and benevolence - act as a source of motivation for the promotion of the welfare of the other rather than the self This article sought to determine the exact nature of the interaction between these sets of values and the consumption of fair trade products. In an earlier study, universalism values were found to have a significant influence on fair trade consumption whereas benevolence values did not, despite their shared goal and values (...)
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  39. Frans W. A. Brom (2004). WTO, Public Reason and Food Public Reasoning in the 'Trade Conflict' on GM-Food. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 7 (4):417 - 431.score: 24.0
    Food trade is of economic importance for both developed and developing countries. Food, however, is a special commodity. Firstly, the lack of food – hunger, under-nourishment, and starvation – is one of the worlds pressing moral problems. But food is not only special because it is necessary for our survival; food is also special because it is strongly related to our social and cultural identity. Two recent transatlantic trade conflicts over food – over the use of artificial growth (...)
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  40. Iain A. Davies (2009). Alliances and Networks: Creating Success in the UK Fair Trade Market. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 86 (1):109 - 126.score: 24.0
    Data from a longitudinal study into the key management success factors in the fair trade industry provide insights into the essential nature of inter-organizational alliances and networks in creating the profitable and growing fair trade market in the UK. Drawing on three case studies and extensive industry interviews, we provide an interpretive perspective on the organizational relationships and business networks and the way in which these have engendered success for UK fair trade companies. Three types of benefit (...)
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  41. Gilles Dutilh, Eric-Jan Wagenmakers, Ingmar Visser & Han L. J. van der Maas (2011). A Phase Transition Model for the Speed-Accuracy Trade-Off in Response Time Experiments. Cognitive Science 35 (2):211-250.score: 24.0
    Most models of response time (RT) in elementary cognitive tasks implicitly assume that the speed-accuracy trade-off is continuous: When payoffs or instructions gradually increase the level of speed stress, people are assumed to gradually sacrifice response accuracy in exchange for gradual increases in response speed. This trade-off presumably operates over the entire range from accurate but slow responding to fast but chance-level responding (i.e., guessing). In this article, we challenge the assumption of continuity and propose a phase transition (...)
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  42. Mireille Hildebrandt (2013). Balance or Trade-Off? Online Security Technologies and Fundamental Rights. Philosophy and Technology 26 (4):357-379.score: 24.0
    In this contribution, I will argue that the image of a balance is often used to defend the idea of a trade-off. To understand the drawbacks of this line of thought, I will explore the relationship between online security technologies and fundamental rights, notably privacy, nondiscrimination, freedom of speech and due process. After discriminating between three types of online security technologies, I will trace the reconfiguration of the notion of privacy in the era of smart environments. This will lead (...)
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  43. Gwang-Suk Kim, Grace Y. Lee & Kiwan Park (2010). A Cross-National Investigation on How Ethical Consumers Build Loyalty Toward Fair Trade Brands. Journal of Business Ethics 96 (4):589 - 611.score: 24.0
    Although Fair Trade has recently experienced rapid growth around the world, there is lack of consumer research that investigates what determines consumers' loyalty toward Fair Trade brands. In this research, we investigate how ethical consumption values (ECV) and two mediating variables, Fair Trade product beliefs (FTPB) and Fair Trade corporate evaluation, (FTCE) determine Fair Trade brand loyalty (FTBL). On the basis of two empirical studies that use samples from the U.S. and Korea, we provide evidence (...)
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  44. Hong-zen Wang (2005). Asian Transnational Corporations and Labor Rights: Vietnamese Trade Unions in Taiwan-Invested Companies. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 56 (1):43 - 53.score: 24.0
    According to the reports in the past decade, some Asian subcontractors, mainly Taiwan, Hong Kong and Korea transnational corporations, tend to be labor abusive in their overseas investment destinations like China or Southeast Asia. Taking Vietnam as an example, this paper raises questions as to why Taiwanese transnational companies can control workplace unions in a trade-union-supportive regime. Given the government s constraint of political rights, and the individualized workplace unions, the function of trade unions in Vietnam is destined (...)
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  45. Christian P. Janssen, Duncan P. Brumby, John Dowell, Nick Chater & Andrew Howes (2011). Identifying Optimum Performance Trade-Offs Using a Cognitively Bounded Rational Analysis Model of Discretionary Task Interleaving. Topics in Cognitive Science 3 (1):123-139.score: 24.0
    We report the results of a dual-task study in which participants performed a tracking and typing task under various experimental conditions. An objective payoff function was used to provide explicit feedback on how participants should trade off performance between the tasks. Results show that participants’ dual-task interleaving strategy was sensitive to changes in the difficulty of the tracking task and resulted in differences in overall task performance. To test the hypothesis that people select strategies that maximize payoff, a Cognitively (...)
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  46. Geoff Moore, Richard Slack & Jane Gibbon (2009). Criteria for Responsible Business Practice in Smes: An Exploratory Case of U.K. Fair Trade Organisations. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 89 (2):173 - 188.score: 24.0
    This paper develops a set of 16 criteria, divided into four groupings, for responsible business practice (RBP) in Small and Medium-Sized Enterprises (SMEs) drawn from the existing SME/RBP literature. The current lack of a general set of criteria against which such activity can be judged is noted and this deficit is redressed. In order to make an initial assessment in support of the criteria so derived, an exploratory feasibility study of RBP in U.K. Fair Trade organisations was conducted. The (...)
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  47. Rosaria Burchielli (2006). The Purpose of Trade Union Values: An Analysis of the ACTU1 Statement of Values. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 68 (2):133 - 142.score: 24.0
    This paper uses the Australian Council of Trade Unions (ACTU) statement of union values as its point of departure to explore the purpose and role of trade union values. Specifically, the paper questions whether the role of values is purely symbolic, serving as a guide to unions, or whether values have a broader role. Furthermore, the paper questions the scope of the ACTU statement, which is currently based on the public work of unions. In conducting this analysis, union (...)
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  48. Stephen Hay (2009). Transforming Social and Educational Governance: Trade Training Centres and the Transition to Social Investment Politics in Australia. British Journal of Educational Studies 57 (3):285 - 304.score: 24.0
    Prior to its election to office in 2007, the Australian Labor Party announced a commitment to introduce Trade Training Centres (TTCs) into all Australian secondary schools as an initiative of its Education Revolution. TTCs were proposed as a key element of Federal Labor's education and training policy that aimed to manage future risks to Australia's competitiveness in the emerging global economy and to support school-to-employment transitions for young people. This analysis adopts a governmentality framework to conceptualise the Federal Government's (...)
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  49. Richard L. Lewis, Michael Shvartsman & Satinder Singh (2013). The Adaptive Nature of Eye Movements in Linguistic Tasks: How Payoff and Architecture Shape Speed‐Accuracy Trade‐Offs. Topics in Cognitive Science 5 (3):581-610.score: 24.0
    We explore the idea that eye-movement strategies in reading are precisely adapted to the joint constraints of task structure, task payoff, and processing architecture. We present a model of saccadic control that separates a parametric control policy space from a parametric machine architecture, the latter based on a small set of assumptions derived from research on eye movements in reading (Engbert, Nuthmann, Richter, & Kliegl, 2005; Reichle, Warren, & McConnell, 2009). The eye-control model is embedded in a decision architecture (a (...)
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  50. Lynette J. Ryals (2010). The Role of Social Capital in the Success of Fair Trade. Journal of Business Ethics 96 (2):317 - 338.score: 24.0
    Fair Trade companies have pulled off an astonishing tour de force. Despite their relatively small size and lack of resources, they have managed to achieve considerable commercial success and, in so doing, have put the fair trade issue firmly onto industry agendas. We analyse the critical role played by social capital in this success and demonstrate the importance of values as an exploitable competitive asset. Our research raises some uncomfortable questions about whether fair trade has 'sold out' (...)
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