Search results for 'G. B. Matthews' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. G. B. Matthews & L. R. Baker (2011). Reply to Oppy's Fool. Analysis 71 (2):303-303.score: 870.0
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  2. Jay G. Hull, Laurie B. Slone, Karen B. Meteyer & Amanda R. Matthews (2002). The Nonconsciousness of Self-Consciousness. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology 83 (2):406-424.score: 870.0
  3. G. B. Matthews (2001). Order in Multiplicity: Homonymy in the Philosophy of Aristotle. Philosophical Review 110 (2):267-269.score: 870.0
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  4. C. J. Acker, G. Baker, J. C. Beall, B. van Fraassen, K. Benson, P. Rehbock, F. Bevilacqua, E. Giannetto, M. Matthews & M. Boon (2003). Anderson, W. The Cultivation of Whiteness (Anderson, Crotty, Garton, and Turnbull) 153 Abir-Am, P. And Elliott, C.(Eds) Commemorative Practices in Sciences Osiris Vol. 14 (Notice-NR) 139. [REVIEW] Metascience 12:455-461.score: 810.0
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  5. Gareth B. Matthews (1971). Dualism and Solecism. Philosophical Review 80 (January):85-95.score: 540.0
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  6. Danielle Matthews, Jessica Butcher, Elena Lieven & Michael Tomasello (2012). Two- and Four-Year-Olds Learn to Adapt Referring Expressions to Context: Effects of Distracters and Feedback on Referential Communication. Topics in Cognitive Science 4 (2):184-210.score: 450.0
    Children often refer to things ambiguously but learn not to from responding to clarification requests. We review and explore this learning process here. In Study 1, eighty-four 2- and 4-year-olds were tested for their ability to request stickers from either (a) a small array with one dissimilar distracter or (b) a large array containing similar distracters. When children made ambiguous requests, they received either general feedback or specific questions about which of two options they wanted. With training, children learned to (...)
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  7. G. Matthews (2004). The Aporetic Augustine. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 78:23-39.score: 450.0
    Augustine was undeniably a dogmatic thinker, but he also had an “aporetic side” which makes him more relevant to Christian philosophers today than isgenerally recognized. Augustine’s first experience of reading philosophy came from Cicero’s Hortensius, from which Augustine gained an appreciation for philosophical scepticism which he never lost. Thus, in all of his works and in all periods of his life, Augustine’s characteristic way of doing philosophy is aporetic, rather than either systematic or speculative. Paradoxically, Augustine’s faith in the truth (...)
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  8. Gareth B. Matthews (1999). On Valuing Perplexity in Education. The Proceedings of the Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy 3:1-10.score: 450.0
    Plato and Aristotle thought that philosophy begins in the perplexed recognition that there are significant puzzles one does not know how to deal with. Some such puzzles can be expressed in questions of the form, ‘How is it possible that p?’, e.g., ‘How is it possible that the world had an absolute beginning?’ I discuss an example of young children asking that last question and go on, with further examples, to make a plea for cultivating such questions as an educational (...)
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  9. Mark Vessey (2003). G. B. Matthews (Ed.): The Augustinian Tradition . Pp. Xix + 398. Berkeley, Los Angeles, and London: University of California Press, 1999. Paper, $18.95. ISBN: 0-520-21001-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 53 (01):255-.score: 270.0
  10. R. F. Stalley (2003). Socratic Aporia G. B. Matthews: Socratic Perplexity and the Nature of Philosophy . Pp. 148. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1999. Cased, £19.99. Isbn: 0-19-823828-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 53 (01):48-.score: 270.0
  11. Valerie Naas (2009). Barbara Levick and Pliny (E.) Bispham, (G. ) Rowe (Edd.) with (E.) Matthews Vita Vigilia Est. Essays in Honour of Barbara Levick. (BICS Supplement 100.) Pp. Xxviii + 193, B/W & Colour Ills. London: Institute of Classical Studies, School of Advanced Study, University of London, 2007 Paper, £30. ISBN: 978-1-905670-14-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 59 (01):150-.score: 243.0
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  12. R. A. Markus (1972). Augustine; a Collection of Critical Essays. Garden City, N.Y.,Anchor Books.score: 90.0
    Introduction, by R. A. Markus.--St. Augustine and Christian Platonism, by A. H. Armstrong.--Action and contemplation, by F. R. J. O'Connell.--St. Augustine on signs, by R. A. Markus.--The theory of signs in St. Augustine's De doctrina Christiana, by B. D. Jackson.--Si fallor, sum, by G. B. Matthews.--Augustine on speaking from memory, by G. B. Matthews.--The inner man, by G. B. Matthews.--On Augustine's concept of a person, by A. C. Lloyd.--Augustine on foreknowledge and free will, by W. L. Rowe.--Augustine (...)
     
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  13. David-Hillel Ruben (ed.) (1993). Explanation. Oxford University Press.score: 81.0
    The aim of this series is to bring together important recent writings in major areas of philosophical inquiry, selected from a variety of sources, mostly periodicals, which may not be conveniently available to the university student or the general reader. The editor of each volume contributes an introductory essay on the items chosen and on the questions with which they deal. A selective bibliography is appended as a guide to further reading. This volume presents a selection of the most important (...)
     
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  14. Matthew P. J. Dillon (1999). Hermes Trismegistus G. Löhr: Verherrlichung Gottes durch Philosophie. Der Hermetische Traktat II im Rahmen der antiken Philosophie- und Religionsgeschichte . Pp. x + 402. Tübingen: J. C. B. Mohr (Paul Siebeck), 1997. Cased, DM 228. ISBN: 3-16-146616-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 49 (01):39-.score: 39.0
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  15. Matthew Black (1955). G. R. Driver: Aramaic Documents of the Fifth Century B.C. Pp. Xi+59; 25 Plates. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1954. Cloth, 84s. Net. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 5 (3-4):329-330.score: 39.0
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  16. Gerardo Bruni (ed.) (1932). The De differentia retoricae, ethicae et politicae. Cincinnati [Etc.]Benziger Brothers.score: 29.0
    Edward Aloysius Pace, philosopher and educator, by J. H. Ryan.-Neo-scholastic philosophy in American Catholic culture, by C. A. Hart.- The significance of Suarez for a revival of scholasticism, by J. F. McCormick.- The new physics and scholasticism, by F. A. Walsh.- The new humanism and standards, by L. R. Ward.- The purpose of the state, by E. F. Murphy.- The concept of beauty in St. Thomas Aquinas, by G. B. Phelan.- The knowableness of God: its relation to the theory of (...)
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  17. Peter Hanks (2009). Teaching and Learning Guide For: Recent Work on Propositions. Philosophy Compass 4 (5):889-892.score: 27.0
    Some of the most interesting recent work in philosophy of language and metaphysics is focused on questions about propositions, the abstract, truth-bearing contents of sentences and beliefs. The aim of this guide is to give instructors and students a road map for some significant work on propositions since the mid-1990s. This work falls roughly into two areas: challenges to the existence of propositions and theories about the nature and structure of propositions. The former includes both a widely discussed puzzle about (...)
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  18. Bettina G. Bergo, Bernard Boxill, Matthew B. Crawford, Patrick Croskery, Michael J. Degnan, Paul Graham, Kenneth Kipnis, Avery H. Kolers, Henry S. Richardson & David S. Weberman (2002). Book Notes. [REVIEW] Ethics 112 (4):884-889.score: 27.0
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  19. George G. Brenkert, Donald A. Brown, Rogene A. Buchholz, Herman E. Daly, Richard Dodd, R. Edward Freeman, Eric T. Freyfogle, R. Goodland, Michael E. Gorman, Andrea Larson, John Lemons, Don Mayer, William McDonough, Matthew M. Mehalik, Ernest Partridge, Jessica Pierce, William E. Rees, Joel E. Reichart, Sandra B. Rosenthal, Mark Sagoff, Julian L. Simon, Scott Sonenshein & Wendy Warren (1998). The Business of Consumption: Environmental Ethics and the Global Economy. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.score: 27.0
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  20. Joel B. Hagen, David A. Mortensen, J. Franklin Egan, Bruce D. Maxwell, Matthew R. Ryan, Richard G. Smith, Will R. Turner, Katrina Brandon, Thomas M. Brooks & Claude Gascon (2012). 11. Biology in History. Bioscience 62 (1).score: 27.0
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  21. Ana S. L. Rodrigues, H. Resit Akcakaya, Sandy J. Andelman, Mohamed I. Bakarr, Luigi Boitani, Thomas M. Brooks, Janice S. Chanson, Lincoln D. C. Fishpool, Gustavo A. B. Da Fonseca, Kevin J. Gaston, Michael Hoffmann, Pablo A. Marquet, John D. Pilgrim, Robert L. Pressey, Jan Schipper, Wes Sechrest, Simon N. Stuart, Les G. Underhill, Robert W. Waller, Matthew E. J. Watts & Xie Yan (2004). Global Gap Analysis: Priority Regions for Expanding the Global Protected-Area Network. Bioscience 54 (12):1092-1100.score: 27.0
    Protected areas are the single most important conservation tool. The global protected-area network has grown substantially in recent decades, now occupying 11.5% of Earth's land surface, but such growth has not been strategically aimed at maximizing the coverage of global biodiversity. In a previous study, we demonstrated that the global network is far from complete, even for the representation of terrestrial vertebrate species. Here we present a first attempt to provide a global framework for the next step of strategically expanding (...)
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