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  1. G. E. Davie (1977). Edmund Husserl and “the as yet, in its Most Important Respect, Unrecognized Greatness of Hume. In Morice (ed.), David Hume.
  2. Ian Tipton, A. D. Ritchie & G. E. Davie (1969). George Berkeley: A Reappraisal. Philosophical Quarterly 19 (74):83.
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  3. G. E. Davie (1965). Berkeley's Impact on Scottish Philosophers. Philosophy 40 (153):222 - 234.
    In 1728, when the sixteen-year-old Hume, still apparently ‘at college’, was beginning, all unknown to his family, to turn his attention to philosophy, Edinburgh and Glasgow were swarming with earnest metaphysicians, many of them not much older than Hume himself. ‘It is well known’, the Ochtertyre papers relate, ‘that between the years 1723 and 1740 nothing was in more request with the Edinburgh literati, both laical and clerical, than metaphysical disquisitions’, and Locke, Clarke, Butler and Berkeley are mentioned as the (...)
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  4. G. E. Davie (1954). Common Sense and Sense-Data. Philosophical Quarterly 4 (July):229-246.
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