Search results for 'G. E. Mead' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. George Mead, Various G.H. Mead Texts.
    The shift in focus has changed the nature of the Project in a way which we hadn't expected and didn't really notice until this revision. Back in the late 1980s, we started the project as a "work around" for a situation that we found personally frustrating. We believed that widely-held beliefs about Mead's ideas were misinterpretations. But his published statements were often difficult to obtain. It was easier for scholars to rely from the secondary literature about Mead than (...)
     
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  2. George Herbert Mead (2011). G.H. Mead: A Reader. Routledge.
    Mead is an exceptional case amongst sociological classics in that, until now, there has been no comprehensive reader of his work. As the first one-volume, comprehensive edited collection of Mead’s published and unpublished writing, this book fills this gap. It is the first to critically assess all of Mead's writings and draw out the aspects that are central to his system of thought. The book is divided into three parts (social psychology, science and epistemology, and democratic politics), (...)
     
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  3.  20
    J. J. E. (1970). The Epistemology of G. E. Moore. Review of Metaphysics 23 (3):558-558.
  4. G. R. S. Mead (1896). "Pistis Sophia. A Gnostic Gospel." G. R. S. Mead. [REVIEW] Ancient Philosophy 7:617.
     
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  5.  12
    C. G. (1977). Niermeyer J. F., Mediae Latinitatis lexicon minus. Leiden: E. J. Brill, 1976. Pp. xviii, 1138. 280 Glds. van de Kieft C., Lake-Schoonebeek G. S. M. M., Abbreviationes et index fontium [to Niermeyer's Lexicon]. Leiden: E. J. Brill, 1976. Pp. xix, 78. [REVIEW] Speculum 52 (4):1081.
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  6. C. E. C. E. (1912). CALÒ G. Fatti e problami del mondo educativo. [REVIEW] Rivista di Filosofia Neo-Scolastica 4:II:298.
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  7. G. G. G. G. (1922). Corrado Barbagallo e G. Pasquali. [REVIEW] Giornale Critico Della Filosofia Italiana 3:417.
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  8. M. G. M. G. (1991). Della Volpe G., "le origini E la formazione Della dialettica hegeliana". Giornale Critico Della Filosofia Italiana 11:333.
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  9. Ella Welby & H. T. E. (1895). Every Day, Thoughts on the G.F.S. Ruler of Life [by E. Welby, Ed by E.H.T.].
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  10.  13
    Glenn R. Negley (1943). Social Philosophy and the Social Mind: A Study of the Genetic Methods of J. M. Baldwin, G. H. Mead and J. E. Boodin. [REVIEW] Journal of Philosophy 40 (24):669-670.
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  11.  1
    Eugene Clay Holmes (1942). Social Philosophy and the Social Mind: A Study of the Genetic Methods of J. M. Baldwin, G. H. Mead and J. E. Boodin. New York.
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  12. Charles Pigden (2007). Desiring to Desire: Russell, Lewis and G.E.Moore. In Susana Nuccetelli & Gary Seay (eds.), Themes from G.E.Moore. Oxford University Press 244-260.
    I have two aims in this paper. In §§2-4 I contend that Moore has two arguments (not one) for the view that that ‘good’ denotes a non-natural property not to be identified with the naturalistic properties of science and common sense (or, for that matter, the more exotic properties posited by metaphysicians and theologians). The first argument, the Barren Tautology Argument (or the BTA), is derived, via Sidgwick, from a long tradition of anti-naturalist polemic. But the second argument, the Open (...)
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  13. G. E. M. Anscombe, Jenny Teichman & Cora Diamond (1979). Intention and Intentionality Essays for G. E. M. Anscombe. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  14. Constantine Cavarnos & G. E. Moore (1979). A Dialogue on G. E. Moore's Ethical Philosophy, Together with an Account of Three Talks with G. E. Moore on Diverse Philosophical Questions. [REVIEW]
     
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  15.  1
    T. E. Jessop (1939). The Philosophy of the Act. By G. H. Mead . Edited, with Introduction, by C. W. Morris in Collaboration with J. M. Brewster, A. M. Dunham, and D. L. Miller . (Chicago: Univ. Of Chicago Press; London: Cambridge Univ. Press. 1938. Pp. Lxxxiv + 696. Price $5; 22s. 6d.). [REVIEW] Philosophy 14 (53):105-.
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  16. G. E. Moore (1993). G.E. Moore: Selected Writings. Routledge.
    G.E. Moore, more than either Bertrand Russell or Ludwig Wittgenstein, was chiefly responsible for the rise of the analytic method in twentieth-century philosophy. This selection of his writings shows Moore at his very best. The classic essays are crucial to major philosophical debates that still resonate today. Amongst those included are: * A Defense of Common Sense * Certainty * Sense-Data * External and Internal Relations * Hume's Theory Explained * Is Existence a Predicate? * Proof of an External World (...)
     
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  17.  25
    Thomas Baldwin (1990). G.E. Moore. Routledge.
    This book is available either individually, or as part of the specially-priced Arguments of the Philosphers Collection.
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  18.  4
    Nancy G. Slack (2003). Are Research Schools Necessary? Contrasting Models of 20th Century Research at Yale Led by Ross Granville Harrison, Grace E. Pickford and G. Evelyn Hutchinson. Journal of the History of Biology 36 (3):501 - 529.
    This paper compares and contrasts three groups that conducted biological research at Yale University during overlapping periods between 1910 and 1970. Yale University proved important as a site for this research. The leaders of these groups were Ross Granville Harrison, Grace E. Pickford, and G. Evelyn Hutchinson, and their members included both graduate students and more experienced scientists. All produced innovative research, including the opening of new subfields in embryology, endocrinology and ecology respectively, over a long period of time. Harrison's (...)
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  19. Paul Levy (1989). Moore G. E. Moore and the Cambridge Apostles. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  20.  7
    David O'Connor (1982). The Metaphysics of G.~E.~Moore. D.~Reidel.
    INTRODUCTION: MOORE AND METAPHYSICS In the course of this book I will make frequent use of the word 'metaphysics'. Indeed I will maintain that that word ...
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  21.  4
    Laurence Perbal (2013). G×E Interaction and Pluralism in the Postgenomic Era. Biological Theory 7 (3):266-274.
    Genetics is in a postgenomic era, and this article illustrates this epistemological evolution using the debate between developmental criticism and traditional biometric genetics about gene × environment interaction. Quantitative geneticists are blamed for failing to respect the complexity of development; as a response, they claim a defensive position, called isolationist pluralism, which supports the idea that studying development is not their problem. But postgenomics seems to have accepted and integrated some developmental criticisms and the isolationist perspective has been challenged during (...)
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  22. A. J. Ayer (2004). Bertrand Russell and G.E. Moore the Analytical Heritage. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  23. Teddy Brunius (1964). G. E. Moore's Analyses of Beauty an Impasse and a Way Out. [Printed by Almqvist & Wiksells].
     
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  24.  12
    G. E. L. Owen, Malcolm Schofield & Martha Craven Nussbaum (eds.) (1982). Language and Logos: Studies in Ancient Greek Pgilosophy Presented to G.E.L. Owen. Cambridge University Press.
    The essays in this volume were written to celebrate the sixtieth birthday of G. E. L. Owen, who by his essays and seminars on ancient Greek philosophy has made a contribution to its study that is second to none. The authors, from both sides of the Atlantic, include not only scholars whose main research interests lie in Greek philosophy, but others best known for their work in general philosophy. All are pupils or younger colleagues of Professor Owen who are indebted (...)
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  25. Dennis A. Rohatyn (1987). The Reluctant Naturalist a Study of G.E. Moore's Principia Ethica. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  26. William H. Shaw (1995). Moore on Right and Wrong the Normative Ethics of G.E. Moore.
     
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  27.  8
    Timothy J. Gallagher (2012). G.H. Mead's Understanding of the Nature of Speech in the Light of Contemporary Research. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 42 (1):40-62.
    The following analysis demonstrates that G.H. Mead's understanding of human speech is remarkably consistent with today's interdisciplinary field that studies speech as a natural behavior with an evolutionary history. Mead seems to have captured major empirical and theoretical insights more than half a century before the contemporary field began to take shape. In that field the framework known as “Tinbergen's Four Questions,” developed in ecology to study naturally occurring behavior in nonhuman animals, has been an effective organizing framework (...)
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  28. Thomas Baldwin (ed.) (2013). G.E. Moore: Selected Writings. Routledge.
    G.E. Moore, more than either Bertrand Russell or Ludwig Wittgenstein, was chiefly responsible for the rise of the analytic method in twentieth-century philosophy. This selection of his writings shows Moore at his very best. The classic essays are crucial to major philosophical debates that still resonate today. Amongst those included are: * _A Defense of Common Sense * Certainty * Sense-Data * External and Internal Relations * Hume's Theory Explained * Is Existence a Predicate? * Proof of an External World (...)
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  29. David G. Stern, Brian Rogers & Gabriel Citron (eds.) (2016). Wittgenstein: Lectures, Cambridge 1930–1933: From the Notes of G. E. Moore. Cambridge University Press.
    This edition of G. E. Moore's notes taken at Wittgenstein's seminal Cambridge lectures in the early 1930s provides, for the first time, an almost verbatim record of those classes. The presentation of the notes is both accessible and faithful to their original manuscripts, and a comprehensive introduction and synoptic table of contents provide the reader with essential contextual information and summaries of the topics in each lecture. The lectures form an excellent introduction to Wittgenstein's middle-period thought, covering a broad range (...)
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  30.  52
    Paul Arthur Schilpp (1952). The Philosophy of G. E. Moore. New York, Tudor Pub. Co..
    --Moore's autobiography.--Descriptive and critical essays on the philosophy of G. E. Moore.--The philosopher replies.--Bibliography of the writings of G. E. Moore (to July, 1952) compiled by Emerson Buchanan and G. E. Moore (p. [689]-699).
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  31. Nikolay Milkov (2004). G. E. Moore and the Greifswald Objectivists on the Given and the Beginning of Analytic Philosophy. Axiomathes 14 (4):361-379.
    Shortly before G. E. Moore wrote down the formative for the early analytic philosophy lectures on Some Main Problems of Philosophy (1910–1911), he had become acquainted with two books which influenced his thought: (1) a book by Husserl's pupil August Messer and (2) a book by the Greifswald objectivist Dimitri Michaltschew. Central to Michaltschew's book was the concept of the given. In Part I, I argue that Moore elaborated his concept of sense-data in the wake of the Greifswald concept. Carnap (...)
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  32.  15
    James Owen Weatherall (2015). On G.E. Moore’s ‘Proof of an External World’. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 97 (2).
    A new reading of G.E. Moore's ‘Proof of an External World’ is offered, on which the Proof is understood as a unique and essential part of an anti-sceptical strategy that Moore worked out early in his career and developed in various forms, from 1909 until his death in 1958. I begin by ignoring the Proof and by developing a reading of Moore's broader response to scepticism. The bulk of the article is then devoted to understanding what role the Proof plays (...)
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  33.  66
    Susana Nuccetelli (ed.) (2007). Themes From G.E. Moore: New Essays in Epistemology and Ethics. Oxford University Press.
    These thirteen original essays, whose authors include some of the world's leading philosophers, examine themes from the work of the Cambridge philosopher G. E. Moore, and demonstrate his considerable continuing influence on philosophical debate. Part I bears on epistemological topics, such as skepticism about the external world, the significance of common sense, and theories of perception. Part II is devoted to themes in ethics, such as Moore's open question argument, his non-naturalism, utilitarianism, and his notion of organic unities.
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  34.  65
    Jonas Olson (2006). G. E. Moore on Goodness and Reasons. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 84 (4):525 – 534.
    Several proponents of the 'buck-passing' account of value have recently attributed to G. E. Moore the implausible view that goodness is reason-providing. I argue that this attribution is unjustified. In addition to its historical significance, the discussion has an important implication for the contemporary value-theoretical debate: the plausible observation that goodness is not reason-providing does not give decisive support to the buck-passing account over its Moorean rivals. The final section of the paper is a survey of what can be said (...)
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  35.  2
    James Owen Weatherall (2015). On G.E. Moore’s ‘Proof of an External World’. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 97 (2).
    A new reading of G.E. Moore's ‘Proof of an External World’ is offered, on which the Proof is understood as a unique and essential part of an anti-sceptical strategy that Moore worked out early in his career and developed in various forms, from 1909 until his death in 1958. I begin by ignoring the Proof and by developing a reading of Moore's broader response to scepticism. The bulk of the article is then devoted to understanding what role the Proof plays (...)
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  36.  2
    James Owen Weatherall (2015). On G.E. Moore’s ‘Proof of an External World’. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 97 (2).
    A new reading of G.E. Moore's ‘Proof of an External World’ is offered, on which the Proof is understood as a unique and essential part of an anti-sceptical strategy that Moore worked out early in his career and developed in various forms, from 1909 until his death in 1958. I begin by ignoring the Proof and by developing a reading of Moore's broader response to scepticism. The bulk of the article is then devoted to understanding what role the Proof plays (...)
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  37.  2
    James Owen Weatherall (2015). On G.E. Moore’s ‘Proof of an External World’. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 97 (2).
    A new reading of G.E. Moore's ‘Proof of an External World’ is offered, on which the Proof is understood as a unique and essential part of an anti-sceptical strategy that Moore worked out early in his career and developed in various forms, from 1909 until his death in 1958. I begin by ignoring the Proof and by developing a reading of Moore's broader response to scepticism. The bulk of the article is then devoted to understanding what role the Proof plays (...)
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  38.  2
    James Owen Weatherall (2015). On G.E. Moore’s ‘Proof of an External World’. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 97 (2):n/a-n/a.
    A new reading of G.E. Moore's ‘Proof of an External World’ is offered, on which the Proof is understood as a unique and essential part of an anti-sceptical strategy that Moore worked out early in his career and developed in various forms, from 1909 until his death in 1958. I begin by ignoring the Proof and by developing a reading of Moore's broader response to scepticism. The bulk of the article is then devoted to understanding what role the Proof plays (...)
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  39.  2
    James Owen Weatherall (2015). On G.E. Moore’s ‘Proof of an External World’. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 97 (2).
    A new reading of G.E. Moore's ‘Proof of an External World’ is offered, on which the Proof is understood as a unique and essential part of an anti-sceptical strategy that Moore worked out early in his career and developed in various forms, from 1909 until his death in 1958. I begin by ignoring the Proof and by developing a reading of Moore's broader response to scepticism. The bulk of the article is then devoted to understanding what role the Proof plays (...)
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  40.  2
    James Owen Weatherall (2015). On G.E. Moore’s ‘Proof of an External World’. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 97 (2).
    A new reading of G.E. Moore's ‘Proof of an External World’ is offered, on which the Proof is understood as a unique and essential part of an anti-sceptical strategy that Moore worked out early in his career and developed in various forms, from 1909 until his death in 1958. I begin by ignoring the Proof and by developing a reading of Moore's broader response to scepticism. The bulk of the article is then devoted to understanding what role the Proof plays (...)
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  41. Andrew Altman (2004). Breathing Life Into a Dead Argument: G.E. Moore and the Open Question. [REVIEW] Philosophical Studies 117 (3):395-408.
    A century after its publication, G.E. Moore''sPrincipia Ethica stands as one of theclassic statements of anti-naturalism inethics. Moore claimed that the most basic ethicalproperties were denoted by `good'' and `bad'' andthat all naturalist accounts of thoseproperties were inadequate. His open-questionargument aimed to refute any proposedidentification of good with some naturalproperty, and Moore concluded from theargument that good must be a nonnaturalproperty.The received view is that the open-questionargument is a failure. In this paper,my aim is to breathe some life back intoMoore''s (...)
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  42.  45
    Consuelo Preti (2008). On the Origins of the Contemporary Notion of Propositional Content: Anti-Psychologism in Nineteenth-Century Psychology and G.E. Moore's Early Theory of Judgment. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 39 (2):176-185.
    I argue that the familiar picture of the rise of analytic philosophy through the early work of G. E. Moore and Bertrand Russell is incomplete and to some degree erroneous. Archival evidence suggests that a considerable influence on Moore, especially evident in his 1899 paper ‘The nature of judgment,’ comes from the literature in nineteenth-century empirical psychology rather than nineteenth-century neo-Hegelianism, as is widely believed. I argue that the conceptual influences of Moore’s paper are more likely to have had their (...)
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  43.  1
    James Owen Weatherall (2015). On G.E. Moore’s ‘Proof of an External World’. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 97 (2).
    A new reading of G.E. Moore's ‘Proof of an External World’ is offered, on which the Proof is understood as a unique and essential part of an anti-sceptical strategy that Moore worked out early in his career and developed in various forms, from 1909 until his death in 1958. I begin by ignoring the Proof and by developing a reading of Moore's broader response to scepticism. The bulk of the article is then devoted to understanding what role the Proof plays (...)
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  44.  1
    James Owen Weatherall (2015). On G.E. Moore’s ‘Proof of an External World’. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 97 (2).
    A new reading of G.E. Moore's ‘Proof of an External World’ is offered, on which the Proof is understood as a unique and essential part of an anti-sceptical strategy that Moore worked out early in his career and developed in various forms, from 1909 until his death in 1958. I begin by ignoring the Proof and by developing a reading of Moore's broader response to scepticism. The bulk of the article is then devoted to understanding what role the Proof plays (...)
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  45.  1
    James Owen Weatherall (2015). On G.E. Moore’s ‘Proof of an External World’. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 97 (2).
    A new reading of G.E. Moore's ‘Proof of an External World’ is offered, on which the Proof is understood as a unique and essential part of an anti-sceptical strategy that Moore worked out early in his career and developed in various forms, from 1909 until his death in 1958. I begin by ignoring the Proof and by developing a reading of Moore's broader response to scepticism. The bulk of the article is then devoted to understanding what role the Proof plays (...)
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  46.  1
    James Owen Weatherall (2015). On G.E. Moore’s ‘Proof of an External World’. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 97 (2).
    A new reading of G.E. Moore's ‘Proof of an External World’ is offered, on which the Proof is understood as a unique and essential part of an anti-sceptical strategy that Moore worked out early in his career and developed in various forms, from 1909 until his death in 1958. I begin by ignoring the Proof and by developing a reading of Moore's broader response to scepticism. The bulk of the article is then devoted to understanding what role the Proof plays (...)
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  47.  1
    James Owen Weatherall (2015). On G.E. Moore’s ‘Proof of an External World’. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 97 (2).
    A new reading of G.E. Moore's ‘Proof of an External World’ is offered, on which the Proof is understood as a unique and essential part of an anti-sceptical strategy that Moore worked out early in his career and developed in various forms, from 1909 until his death in 1958. I begin by ignoring the Proof and by developing a reading of Moore's broader response to scepticism. The bulk of the article is then devoted to understanding what role the Proof plays (...)
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  48.  1
    James Owen Weatherall (2015). On G.E. Moore’s ‘Proof of an External World’. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 97 (2).
    A new reading of G.E. Moore's ‘Proof of an External World’ is offered, on which the Proof is understood as a unique and essential part of an anti-sceptical strategy that Moore worked out early in his career and developed in various forms, from 1909 until his death in 1958. I begin by ignoring the Proof and by developing a reading of Moore's broader response to scepticism. The bulk of the article is then devoted to understanding what role the Proof plays (...)
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  49.  1
    James Owen Weatherall (2015). On G.E. Moore’s ‘Proof of an External World’. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 97 (2).
    A new reading of G.E. Moore's ‘Proof of an External World’ is offered, on which the Proof is understood as a unique and essential part of an anti-sceptical strategy that Moore worked out early in his career and developed in various forms, from 1909 until his death in 1958. I begin by ignoring the Proof and by developing a reading of Moore's broader response to scepticism. The bulk of the article is then devoted to understanding what role the Proof plays (...)
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  50.  1
    James Owen Weatherall (2015). On G.E. Moore’s ‘Proof of an External World’. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 97 (2).
    A new reading of G.E. Moore's ‘Proof of an External World’ is offered, on which the Proof is understood as a unique and essential part of an anti-sceptical strategy that Moore worked out early in his career and developed in various forms, from 1909 until his death in 1958. I begin by ignoring the Proof and by developing a reading of Moore's broader response to scepticism. The bulk of the article is then devoted to understanding what role the Proof plays (...)
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