Search results for 'G. E. Mead' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. George Mead, Various G.H. Mead Texts.score: 4020.0
    The shift in focus has changed the nature of the Project in a way which we hadn't expected and didn't really notice until this revision. Back in the late 1980s, we started the project as a "work around" for a situation that we found personally frustrating. We believed that widely-held beliefs about Mead's ideas were misinterpretations. But his published statements were often difficult to obtain. It was easier for scholars to rely from the secondary literature about Mead than (...)
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  2. G. E. Mead & C. J. Turnbull (1995). Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in the Elderly: Patients' and Relatives' Views. Journal of Medical Ethics 21 (1):39-44.score: 870.0
    One hundred inpatients on an acute hospital elderly care unit and 43 of their relatives were interviewed shortly before hospital discharge. Eighty per cent of elderly patients and their relatives were aware of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Television drama was their main source of information. Patients and relatives overestimated the effectiveness of CPR. Eighty-six per cent of patients were willing to be routinely consulted by doctors about their own CPR status, but relatives were less enthusiastic about routine consultation. Patients' and relatives' (...)
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  3. Aaron M. Mead (2009). Hegel and Externalism About Intentions. The Owl of Minerva 41 (1-2):107-142.score: 510.0
    My aim in this paper is to suggest that intentions are, as G. E. M. Anscombe puts it, not exclusively “private and interior” act-descriptions that agents alone determine. Rather, I argue that the true intention of an action is frequently constrained, and sometimes even determined, by the intersubjective and retrospective view of an action. I begin by offering an interpretation of Hegel’s account of intention in The Philosophy of Right—an interpretation that fits well with work by Charles Taylor and Michael (...)
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  4. Eugene Clay Holmes (1942). Social Philosophy and the Social Mind: A Study of the Genetic Methods of J. M. Baldwin, G. H. Mead and J. E. Boodin. New York.score: 435.0
     
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  5. T. E. Jessop (1939). The Philosophy of the Act. By G. H. Mead . Edited, with Introduction, by C. W. Morris in Collaboration with J. M. Brewster, A. M. Dunham, and D. L. Miller . (Chicago: Univ. Of Chicago Press; London: Cambridge Univ. Press. 1938. Pp. Lxxxiv + 696. Price $5; 22s. 6d.). [REVIEW] Philosophy 14 (53):105-.score: 219.0
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  6. Jake E. Stone (2013). Mead's Interpretation of Relativity Theory. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 27 (2):153-171.score: 135.0
    Scholars who engage with texts that were written by George Herbert Mead (e.g., 1925e.g., 1926e.g., 1929e.g., 1932e.g., 1938) in the latter half of the 1920s are faced with the task of comprehending Mead’s interpretation of relativity theory and also understanding why relativity theory was considered by Mead to have such profound implications for his own philosophy. As several scholars of Mead’s work have explained (e.g., Joas 1997; Martin 2007; Rosenthal and Bourgeois 1991), Mead was a (...)
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  7. Vincent G. Potter (ed.) (1988). Doctrine and Experience: Essays in American Philosophy. Fordham University Press.score: 90.0
    This collection of thirteen essays, when viewed together, offers a unique perspective on the history of American philosophy. It illuminates for the first time in book form, how thirteen major American philosophical thinkers viewed a problem of special interest in the American philosophical tradition: the relationship between experience and reflection. Written by well-known authorities on the figure about which he or she writes, the essays are arranged chronologically to highlight the changes and developments in thought from Puritanism to Pragmatism to (...)
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  8. Rhodri Hayward (2012). The Invention of the Psychosocial: An Introduction. History of the Human Sciences 25 (5):3-12.score: 87.0
    Although the compound adjective ‘psychosocial’ was first used by academic psychologists in the 1890s, it was only in the interwar period that psychiatrists, psychologists and social workers began to develop detailed models of the psychosocial domain. These models marked a significant departure from earlier ideas of the relationship between society and human nature. Whereas Freudians and Darwinians had described an antagonistic relationship between biological instincts and social forces, interwar authors insisted that individual personality was made possible through collective organization. This (...)
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  9. Timothy J. Nokes-Malach, Michelle L. Meade & Daniel G. Morrow (2012). The Effect of Expertise on Collaborative Problem Solving. Thinking and Reasoning 18 (1):32 - 58.score: 24.0
    Why do some groups succeed where others fail? We hypothesise that collaborative success is achieved when the relationship between the dyad's prior expertise and the complexity of the task creates a situation that affords constructive and interactive processes between group members. We call this state the zone of proximal facilitation in which the dyad's prior knowledge and experience enables them to benefit from both knowledge-based problem-solving processes (e.g., elaboration, explanation, and error correction) andcollaborative skills (e.g., creating common ground, maintaining joint (...)
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