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Gareth B. Matthews [122]GB Matthews [23]Gareth Matthews [20]Gwynneth Matthews [13]
G. H. Matthews [11]Gordon Matthews [8]Gerald Matthews [8]Gene W. Matthews [6]

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See also:
Profile: Gesima Matthews (University of Melbourne)
Profile: George W. Matthews (Plymouth State University)
Profile: Georgia Matthews
Profile: Genae Matthews (Wellesley College)
  1. Gareth Matthews (2008). The Philosophy of Childhood. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism.
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  2. Gareth B. Matthews & Lynne Rudder Baker (2010). The Ontological Argument Simplified. Analysis 70 (2):210-212.
    The ontological argument in Anselm’s Proslogion II continues to generate a remarkable store of sophisticated commentary and criticism. However, in our opinion, much of this literature ignores or misrepresents the elegant simplicity of the original argument. The dialogue below seeks to restore that simplicity, with one important modification. Like the original, it retains the form of a reductio, which we think is essential to the argument’s great genius. However, it seeks to skirt the difficult question of whether 'exists' is a (...)
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  3.  41
    Gareth B. Matthews (1980). Philosophy and the Young Child. Harvard University Press.
    In a series of exquisite examples that could only have been gathered by a professional philosopher with an extraordinary respect for young minds, Gareth...
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  4. Gareth B. Matthews (1984). Dialogues with Children. Harvard University Press.
     
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  5.  66
    Lynne Rudder Baker & Gareth Matthews (2010). Anselm's Argument Reconsidered. Review of Metaphysics 64 (1):31-54.
    Anselm’s argument for the existence of God in Proslogion 2 has a little-noticed feature: It can be properly formulated only by beings who have the ability to think of things and refer to things independently of whether or not they exist in reality. The authors explore this cognitive ability and try to make clear the role it plays in the ontological argument. Then, we offer a new version of the ontological argument, which, we argue, is sound: it is valid, has (...)
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  6.  92
    G. M. Matthews (1952). I Can If I Choose. Analysis 12 (6):131-132.
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  7. Gareth B. Matthews (1974). Moore on `See': Modes of Polysemy. Journal of Philosophy 71 (19):711-721.
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  8. Geoffrey Matthews (1979). Time's Arrow and the Structure of Spacetime. Philosophy of Science 46 (1):82-97.
    The theory of general relativity has produced some great insights into the nature of space and time. Unfortunately, its relevance to the problem of the direction of time has been overestimated. This paper points out that the problem of the direction of time can be formulated in purely local ways, and that in this kind of formulation considerations of general relativity are of little or no importance. On the basis of this, positions which assume that relativistic considerations are always relevant (...)
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  9. Gareth B. Matthews & S. Marc Cohen (1967). Wants and Lacks. Journal of Philosophy 64 (14):455-456.
    Anthony Kenny says it is impossible to want what one already has and knows one has. We present a counter-example and then suggest that Kenny may have been misled by the fact that wanting expresses itself in goal-directed behavior. From the truism that one's behavior cannot be directed toward a goal that one knows one has already attained, Kenny may have been led to suppose that behavior directed toward an as yet unattained goal cannot express one's desire for what one (...)
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  10.  68
    Gareth B. Matthews (1993). Substance and Predication in Aristotle. Review of Metaphysics 46 (3):624-625.
  11.  59
    G. B. Matthews & L. R. Baker (2011). Reply to Oppy's Fool. Analysis 71 (2):303-303.
    Anselm: I agreed that Pegasus is a flying horse according to the stories people tell, the paintings painters paint and so on . That is, Pegasus is a flying horse in the understanding of storytellers, their readers and the artists who depict Pegasus. You asked whether flying is not an unmediated causal power . Well, it could be an unmediated causal power if you or I had it, but not if a being with only mediated powers had it. And so (...)
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  12. Allan Bäck, Robert Bolton, J. D. G. Evans, Michael Ferejohn, Eugene Garver, Lenn E. Goodman, Edward Halper, Martha Husain, Gareth Matthews & Robin Smith (1999). From Puzzles to Principles?: Essays on Aristotle's Dialectic. Lexington Books.
    Scholars of classical philosophy have long disputed whether Aristotle was a dialectical thinker. Most agree that Aristotle contrasts dialectical reasoning with demonstrative reasoning, where the former reasons from generally accepted opinions and the latter reasons from the true and primary. Starting with a grasp on truth, demonstration never relinquishes it. Starting with opinion, how could dialectical reasoning ever reach truth, much less the truth about first principles? Is dialectic then an exercise that reiterates the prejudices of one's times and at (...)
     
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  13.  23
    Gareth B. Matthews (1999). Socratic Perplexity and the Nature of Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
    Gareth Matthews suggests that we can better understand the nature of philosophical inquiry if we recognize the central role played by perplexity. The seminal representation of philosophical perplexity is in Plato's dialogues; Matthews examines the intriguing shifts in Plato's attitude to perplexity and suggests that these may represent a course of philosophical development that philosophers follow even today.
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  14. Johannes Brachtendorf, John D. Caputo, Jesse Couenhoven, Alexander R. Eodice, Wayne J. Hankey, John Peter Kenney, Paul A. Macdonald Jr, Gareth B. Matthews, Roland J. Teske, Frederick Van Fleteren & James Wetzel (2010). Augustine and Philosophy. Lexington Books.
    The essays in this book, by a variety of leading Augustine scholars, examine not only Augustine's multifaceted philosophy and its relation to his epoch-making theology, but also his practice as a philosopher, as well as his relation to other philosophers both before and after him. Thus the collection shows that Augustine's philosophy remains an influence and a provocation in a wide variety of settings today.
     
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  15. Gareth B. Matthews (2004). The Ontological Argument. In William Mann (ed.), The Blackwell Guide to the Philosophy of Religion. Blackwell Pub.
     
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  16. Gareth B. Matthews (1985). The Idea of a Psychological Organism. Behaviorism 13 (1):37-52.
    Each of the following might be considered both necessary and sufficient for an organism to count as a psychological organism: (a) being able to do something that requires a psychological theory to explain; (b) being capable of having experiences; (c) being motivated; (d) behaving in ways that are the joint outcome of the organism's beliefs and desires; (e) being capable of instrumental learning, or operant conditioning; (f) being susceptible to classical conditioning. This paper takes up each of these candidates in (...)
     
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  17.  6
    Moshe Zeidner, Gerald Matthews, A. J. Elliot & C. S. Dweck (2005). Evaluation Anxiety. In Andrew J. Elliot & Carol S. Dweck (eds.), Handbook of Competence and Motivation. The Guilford Press
  18.  51
    Gareth B. Matthews (1990). Aristotelian Essentialism. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 50:251-262.
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  19. Gareth Matthews (2009). Whatever Became of the Socratic Elenchus? Philosophical Analysis in Plato. Philosophy Compass 4 (3):439-450.
    Readers who are introduced to philosophical analysis by reading the early Platonic dialogues may be puzzled to find that Plato, in his middle and late periods, largely abandons the style of analysis characteristic of early Plato, namely, the 'Socratic elenchus'. This paper undertakes to solve the puzzle. In contrast to what is popularly called 'the Socratic method', the elenchus requires that Socrates, the lead investigator, not have a satisfactory answer to his 'What is F-ness?' question. Here is the bind. Part (...)
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  20.  4
    Gerald Matthews & Sian E. Campbell (2010). Dynamic Relationships Between Stress States and Working Memory. Cognition and Emotion 24 (2):357-373.
  21.  59
    Gareth B. Matthews & S. Marc Cohen (1968). The One and the Many. Review of Metaphysics 21 (4):630-655.
    We discuss Aristotle's "Categories" as an answer to Plato's One-over-Many argument. For Plato, F-ness is something "over against" particular F things; to predicate "F" of these things is to assert that they all stand in a certain relation to F-ness. Aristotle answers that predication is classification; and there being a classification of a certain sort is a fact correlative with there being things classifiable in the way the classification in question would classify them.
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  22.  8
    Gareth B. Matthews (ed.) (1998). The Augustinian Tradition. University of California Press.
    Students and scholars will find that these essays provide impressive evidence of the persisting vitality of Augustine's thought.
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  23. A. Wells & G. Matthews (1999). The Cognitive Science of Attention and Emotion. In Tim Dalgleish & M. J. Powers (eds.), Handbook of Cognition and Emotion. Wiley
     
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  24.  59
    Gareth Matthews (2002). On the Idea of There Being Something of Everything in Everything. Analysis 62 (273):1–4.
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  25.  12
    Gerald Matthews & Adrian Wells (1988). Relationships Between Anxiety, Self-Consciousness, and Cognitive Failure. Cognition and Emotion 2 (2):123-132.
  26.  26
    George Matthews (1997). Hegel's Theory of Madness. The Owl of Minerva 28 (2):253-259.
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  27. Gareth B. Matthews (1982). Accidental Unities. In M. Schofield & M. C. Nussbaum (eds.), Language and Logos. Cambridge University Press 223--240.
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  28.  70
    E. H. Hutten, A. Watson, H. Hudson, R. G. Durrant, D. H. Monro, P. F. Strawson, A. N. Prior, E. J. Lemmon, J. L. Evans, R. N. Smart, G. M. Matthews, S. Körner, William Gerber & W. G. Roll (1959). New Books. [REVIEW] Mind 68 (271):405-431.
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  29.  25
    Gareth B. Matthews (2005). Anaxagoras Re-Defended. Ancient Philosophy 25 (2):245-246.
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  30.  15
    Gareth B. Matthews (1984). “It Is No Longer I That Do It …”. Faith and Philosophy 1 (1):44-49.
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  31.  14
    Gareth B. Matthews (1985). Parents and Children: The Ethics of the Family by Jeffrey Blustein. Journal of Philosophy 82 (6):330-332.
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  32.  31
    Gareth B. Matthews (1992). Thought's Ego in Augustine and Descartes. Cornell University Press.
    This book will be of great interest to philosophers of mind and epistemologists, historians of philosophy and their students, philosophers of religion, and ...
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  33.  48
    Gareth B. Matthews (1977). Consciousness and Life. Philosophy 52 (January):13-26.
    In L. Frank Baum's story, Ozma of Oz , which is a sequel to Baum's much more famous story, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz , Dorothy and her companion come upon a wound-down mechanical man bearing a label on which are printed the following words: Smith and Tinker's Patent Double-Action, Extra-Responsive, Thought-Creating Perfect-Talking MECHANICAL MAN Fitted with our Special Clock-Work Attachment Thinks, Speaks, Acts, and Does Everything but Live As Dorothy and her companion are made to discover when they wind (...)
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  34.  20
    Gareth B. Matthews (2003). Augustine on the Mind's Search for Itself. Faith and Philosophy 20 (4):415-429.
    In De trinitate X Augustine seeks to discover the nature of mind. As if recalling Plato’s Paradox of Inquiry, he wonders how such a search can be coherently understood. Rejecting the idea that the mind knows itself only indirectly, or partially, or by description, he insists that nothing is so present to the mind as itself. Yet it is open to the mind to perfect its knowledge of itself by coming to realize that its nature is to be only what (...)
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  35.  77
    Gareth B. Matthews (1977). Surviving As. Analysis 37 (January):53-58.
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  36.  1
    Gerald Matthews, Amanda K. Emo, Gregory Funke, Moshe Zeidner, Richard D. Roberts, Paul T. Costa & Ralf Schulze (2006). Emotional Intelligence, Personality, and Task-Induced Stress. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied 12 (2):96-107.
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  37.  25
    GB Matthews (1986). Gender and Essence in Aristotle. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 64 (sup1):16-25.
    That aristotle should have been inclined to think of women as defective men is, Perhaps, Overdetermined. But the psychological and sociological factors that contributed to his male chauvinism should not be allowed to obscure the role his metaphysics played in the way he conceived gender difference. Basic metaphysical constraints left aristotle with no entirely satisfactory way of understanding gender identity. Since we today are still so strongly influenced by aristotle's ways of thinking about essence and classification, His problem with gender (...)
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  38.  35
    Gareth B. Matthews (1963). Aquinas on Saying That God Doesn't Exist. The Monist 47 (3):472-477.
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  39.  18
    Gareth B. Matthews (2003). Augustine on the Mind's Search for Itself. Faith and Philosophy 20 (4):415-429.
    In De trinitate X Augustine seeks to discover the nature of mind (mens). As if recalling Plato’s Paradox of Inquiry, he wonders how such a search can be coherently understood. Rejecting the idea that the mind knows itself only indirectly, or partially, or by description, he insists that nothing is so present to the mind as itself. Yet it is open to the mind to perfect its knowledge of itself by coming to realize that its nature is to be only (...)
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  40.  25
    Gareth B. Matthews (2012). Death in Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle. In Fred Feldman Ben Bradley (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Death. OUP Usa 186.
    This chapter examines the views of death by ancient Greek philosophers including Aristotle, Socrates, and Plato. It suggests that Aristotle offered no cheerful optimism similar to Socrates in his “Apology” and did not provide any arguments about the immortality of the soul like Plato in “Phaedo.” What Aristotle attempted to do was to help us face immortality that can enhance our chances of living worthy lives.
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  41.  1
    Gareth B. Matthews (1978). Animals and the Unity of Psychology: Gareth B. Matthews. Philosophy 53 (206):437-454.
    By ‘the unity of psychology’ I mean something one might also express by saying that the psychology of human beings is part of the psychology of animals generally. Perhaps there are several different ways of trying to trace out the ramifications of the idea that psychology is one. A central consideration, I think, is likely to be some sort of principle of continuity up and down the scale of nature. The idea would be that up and down the scale of (...)
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  42.  15
    Gareth Matthews (forthcoming). Aristotle: Psychology. Ancient Philosophy.
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  43.  48
    Gareth B. Matthews (1972). Senses and Kinds. Journal of Philosophy 64 (6):149-157.
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  44.  40
    Gareth B. Matthews (2000). The Ring of Gyges. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 14 (1):3-11.
    This paper illustrates some of the exciting and interesting philosophical discussions we can have with children when we let them develop the thread of the conversation in their own ways. The author discusses the virtue of patience when doing philosophy with children, and the importance of letting the rhythms of the discussion unfold without undue adult interference. Adults (and especially teachers) often attempt to control the ways in which children discuss issues with one another. The author reminds us of how (...)
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  45.  7
    Gareth B. Matthews (1989). The Enigma of Categories 1a20ff and Why It Matters. Apeiron 22 (4).
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  46.  63
    Gareth B. Matthews (1997). Two Theories of Supposition? Topoi 16 (1):35-40.
    In a recent paper Paul Vincent Spade suggests that, although the medieval doctrine of the modes of personal supposition originally had something to do with the rest of the theory of supposition, it became, by the 14th century, an unrelated theory with no question to answer. By contrast, I argue that the theory of the modes of personal supposition was meant to provide a way of making understandable the idea that a general term in a categorical proposition can be used (...)
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  47.  19
    Gareth B. Matthews (2000). Descartes and Augustine. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 61 (3):721-723.
  48.  31
    Gareth B. Matthews (2011). Aristotle on the Organ of Touch. Ancient Philosophy 31 (2):327-337.
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  49.  50
    Gareth B. Matthews & Thomas A. Blackson (1989). Causes in Thephaedo. Synthese 79 (3):581 - 591.
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  50. Susan M. Turner & Gareth B. Matthews (eds.) (1998). The Philosopher's Child: Critical Perspectives in the Western Tradition. University of Rochester Press.
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