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Graham Priest [226]G. Priest [24]Graham George Priest [2]
  1.  513 DLs
    Frank Jackson, Graham Priest & David Lewis (2004). How Many Lives Has Schrodinger's Cat? Australasian Journal of Philosophy 82 (1):3-22.
  2.  468 DLs
    Mark Colyvan, Jay L. Garfield & Graham Priest (2005). Problems with the Argument From Fine Tuning. Synthese 145 (3):325 - 338.
    The argument from fine tuning is supposed to establish the existence of God from the fact that the evolution of carbon-based life requires the laws of physics and the boundary conditions of the universe to be more or less as they are. We demonstrate that this argument fails. In particular, we focus on problems associated with the role probabilities play in the argument. We show that, even granting the fine tuning of the universe, it does not follow that the universe (...)
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  3.  373 DLs
    Frank Jackson, Graham Priest & Adam Elga (2004). Infinitesimal Chances and the Laws of Nature. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 82 (1):67 – 76.
    The 'best-system' analysis of lawhood [Lewis 1994] faces the 'zero-fit problem': that many systems of laws say that the chance of history going actually as it goes--the degree to which the theory 'fits' the actual course of history--is zero. Neither an appeal to infinitesimal probabilities nor a patch using standard measure theory avoids the difficulty. But there is a way to avoid it: replace the notion of 'fit' with the notion of a world being typical with respect to a theory.
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  4.  286 DLs
    Graham Priest (1998). What is so Bad About Contradictions? Journal of Philosophy 95 (8):410-426.
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  5.  267 DLs
    Graham Priest (2010). Hopes Fade for Saving Truth. [REVIEW] Philosophy 85 (1):109-140.
  6.  176 DLs
    Graham Priest (1997). Sexual Perversion. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 75 (3):360 – 372.
  7.  163 DLs
    Graham Priest (1979). The Logic of Paradox. Journal of Philosophical Logic 8 (1):219 - 241.
  8.  158 DLs
    Jay L. Garfield & Graham Priest (2003). Nagarjuna and the Limits of Thought. Philosophy East and West 53 (1):1-21.
    : Nagarjuna seems willing to embrace contradictions while at the same time making use of classic reductio arguments. He asserts that he rejects all philosophical views including his own-that he asserts nothing-and appears to mean it. It is argued here that he, like many philosophers in the West and, indeed, like many of his Buddhist colleagues, discovers and explores true contradictions arising at the limits of thought. For those who share a dialetheist's comfort with the possibility of true contradictions commanding (...)
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  9.  150 DLs
    Graham Priest (2009). The Structure of Emptiness. Philosophy East and West 59 (4):pp. 467-480.
    The view that everything is empty (śūnya) is a central metaphysical plank of Mahāyāna Buddhism. It has often been the focus of objections. Perhaps the most important of these is that it in effect entails a nihilism: nothing exists. This objection, in turn, is denied by Mahāyāna theorists, such as Nāgārjuna. One of the things that makes the debate difficult is that the precise import of the view that everything is empty is unclear. The object of this essay is to (...)
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  10.  148 DLs
    Jay Garfield & Graham Priest (2008). The Way of the Dialetheist: Contradictions in Buddhism. Philosophy East and West 58 (3):395 - 402.
    Anyone who is accustomed to the view that contradictions cannot be true, and cannot be accepted, and who reads texts in the Buddhists traditions will be struck by the fact that they frequently contain contradictions. Just consider, for example.
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  11.  148 DLs
    Francesco Berto & Graham Priest (2008). Dialetheism. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (2008).
    A dialetheia is a sentence, A, such that both it and its negation, ¬A, are true (we shall talk of sentences throughout this entry; but one could run the definition in terms of propositions, statements, or whatever one takes as her favourite truth-bearer: this would make little difference in the context). Assuming the fairly uncontroversial view that falsity just is the truth of negation, it can equally be claimed that a dialetheia is a sentence which is both true and false.
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  12.  142 DLs
    Graham Priest (2006). What is Philosophy? Philosophy 81 (2):189-207.
    ‘What is philosophy?’ is a question that every professional philosopher must ask themself sometimes. In a sense, of course, they know: they spend much time doing it. But in another sense, the answer to the question is not at all obvious. In the same way, any person knows by acquaintance what breathing is; but this does not mean that they know the nature of breathing: its mechanism and function. The nature of breathing, in this sense, is now well understood; the (...)
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  13.  141 DLs
    Graham Priest (2010). Inclosures, Vagueness, and Self-Reference. Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 51 (1):69-84.
    In this paper, I start by showing that sorites paradoxes are inclosure paradoxes. That is, they fit the Inclosure Scheme which characterizes the paradoxes of self-reference. Given that sorites and self-referential paradoxes are of the same kind, they should have the same kind of solution. The rest of the paper investigates what a dialetheic solution to sorites paradoxes is like, connections with a dialetheic solution to the self-referential paradoxes, and related issues—especially so called "higher order" vagueness.
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  14.  137 DLs
    Graham Priest & Greg Restall, Envelopes and Indifference.
    Consider this situation: Here are two envelopes. You have one of them. Each envelope contains some quantity of money, which can be of any positive real magnitude. One contains twice the amount of money that the other contains, but you do not know which one. You can keep the money in your envelope, whose numerical value you do not know at this stage, or you can exchange envelopes and have the money in the other. You wish to maximise your money. (...)
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  15.  133 DLs
    Graham Priest & Stephen Read (1980). Merely Confused Supposition. Franciscan Studies 40 (1):265-97.
    In this article, we discuss the notion of merely confused supposition as it arose in the medieval theory of suppositio personalis. The context of our analysis is our formalization of William of Ockham's theory of supposition sketched in Mind 86 (1977), 109-13. The present paper is, however, self-contained, although we assume a basic acquaintance with supposition theory. The detailed aims of the paper are: to look at the tasks that supposition theory took on itself and to use our formalization to (...)
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  16.  130 DLs
    Graham Priest (2000). Truth and Contradiction. Philosophical Quarterly 50 (200):305-319.
    I argue that there is nothing about truth as such that prevents contradictions from being true. I argue this by considering the main standard accounts of truth, and showing that they are quite compatible with the existence of true contradictions. Indeed, in many cases, they are actually friendly to the idea.
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  17.  129 DLs
    Yasuo Deguchi, Jay L. Garfield & Graham Priest (2013). How We Think Mādhyamikas Think: A Response To Tom Tillemans. Philosophy East and West 63 (3):426-435.
    In his article in this issue, " 'How do Mādhyamikas Think?' Revisited," Tom Tillemans reflects on his earlier article "How do Mādhyamikas Think?" (2009), itself a response to earlier work of ours (Deguchi et al. 2008; Garfield and Priest 2003). There is much we agree with in these non-dogmatic and open-minded essays. Still, we have some disagreements. We begin with a response to Tillemans' first thoughts, and then turn to his second thoughts.Tillemans (2009) maintains that it is wrong to attribute (...)
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  18.  105 DLs
    Graham Priest (2006). In Contradiction: A Study of the Transconsistent. Oxford University Press.
  19.  99 DLs
    Koji Tanaka & Graham Priest, Don't Think! Just Act!
    Kenzo saw a slight movement of his opponent. “Now is the time to strike!” he thought. He started moving. But before he had time to raise his shinai (sword) he was struck on the men (head) by his opponent. “Ippon!” the judge called.
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  20.  97 DLs
    Graham Priest (2006). Doubt Truth to Be a Liar. Oxford University Press.
    Dialetheism is the view that some contradictions are true. This is a view which runs against orthodoxy in logic and metaphysics since Aristotle, and has implications for many of the core notions of philosophy. Doubt Truth to Be a Liar explores these implications for truth, rationality, negation, and the nature of logic, and develops further the defense of dialetheism first mounted in Priest's In Contradiction, a second edition of which is also available.
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  21.  97 DLs
    Graham Priest (2008). An Introduction to Non-Classical Logic: From If to Is. Cambridge University Press.
    Clearly introduces the major topics in logic and their relation to current philosophical issues.
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  22.  92 DLs
    Graham Priest (2008). The Closing of the Mind: How the Particular Quantifier Became Existentially Loaded Behind Our Backs. Review of Symbolic Logic 1 (1):42-55.
    The paper argues that the view that the particular quantifier is is a relatively new one historically and that it has become entrenched in modern philosophical logic for less than happy reasons.
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  23.  90 DLs
    Jc Beall, Graham Priest & Zack Weber (2011). Can U Do That? Analysis 71 (2):280-285.
    In his ‘On t and u and what they can do’, Greg Restall presents an apparent problem for a handful of well-known non-classical solutions to paradoxes like the liar. In this article, we argue that there is a problem only if classical logic – or classical-enough logic – is presupposed. 1. Background Many have thought that invoking non-classical logic – in particular, a paracomplete or paraconsistent logic – is the correct response to the liar and related paradoxes. At the most (...)
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  24.  87 DLs
    Jc Beall, Ross Brady, J. Michael Dunn, A. P. Hazen, Edwin Mares, Robert K. Meyer, Graham Priest, Greg Restall, David Ripley, John Slaney & Richard Sylvan (2012). On the Ternary Relation and Conditionality. Journal of Philosophical Logic 41 (3):595 - 612.
    One of the most dominant approaches to semantics for relevant (and many paraconsistent) logics is the Routley-Meyer semantics involving a ternary relation on points. To some (many?), this ternary relation has seemed like a technical trick devoid of an intuitively appealing philosophical story that connects it up with conditionality in general. In this paper, we respond to this worry by providing three different philosophical accounts of the ternary relation that correspond to three conceptions of conditionality. We close by briefly discussing (...)
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  25.  84 DLs
    Frank Jackson, Graham Priest & Rae Langton (2004). Elusive Knowledge of Things in Themselves. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 82 (1):129 – 136.
    Kant argued that we have no knowledge of things in themselves, no knowledge of the intrinsic properties of things, a thesis that is not idealism but epistemic humility. David Lewis agrees (in 'Ramseyan Humility'), but for Ramseyan reasons rather than Kantian. I compare the doctrines of Ramseyan and Kantian humility, and argue that Lewis's contextualist strategy for rescuing knowledge from the sceptic (proposed elsewhere) should also rescue knowledge of things in themselves. The rescue would not be complete: for knowledge of (...)
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  26.  83 DLs
    Graham Priest (1979). Two Dogmas of Quineanism. Philosophical Quarterly 29 (117):289-301.
    The paper argues for two theses: a) there are certain truths which are analytic; b) these are true by convention. Much of the paper deals with quine's arguments against these claims. The paper starts by accepting quine's network theory of belief and arguing that this presupposes a certain concept of rule following. This may be used to define analyticity. The paper then discusses the conventional nature of rule following and argues that this implies the conventional truth of analytic truths. Quine's (...)
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  27.  82 DLs
    Graham Priest (2010). Badici on Inclosures and the Liar Paradox. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 88 (2):359-366.
    Badici [2008] criticizes views of Priest [2002] concerning the Inclosure Schema and the paradoxes of self-reference. This article explains why his criticisms are to be rejected.
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  28.  81 DLs
    Frank Jackson, Graham Priest & Robert Stalnaker (2004). Lewis on Intentionality. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 82 (1):199 – 212.
    David Lewis's account of intentionality is a version of what he calls 'global descriptivism'. The rough idea is that the correct interpretation of one's total theory is the one (among the admissible interpretations) that come closest to making it true. I give an exposition of this account, as I understand it, and try to bring out some of its consequences. I argue that there is a tension between Lewis's global descriptivism and his rejection of a linguistic account of the intentionality (...)
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  29.  80 DLs
    Graham Priest (1994). Derrida and Self-Reference. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 72 (1):103 – 111.
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  30.  80 DLs
    Graham Priest (2005). Towards Non-Being: The Logic and Metaphysics of Intentionality. Oxford University Press.
    Graham Priest presents a ground-breaking account of the semantics of intentional language--verbs such as "believes," "fears," "seeks," or "imagines." Towards Non-Being proceeds in terms of objects that may be either existent or non-existent, at worlds that may be either possible or impossible. The book will be of central interest to anyone who is concerned with intentionality in the philosophy of mind or philosophy of language, the metaphysics of existence and identity, the philosophy of fiction, the philosophy of mathematics, or cognitive (...)
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  31.  80 DLs
    Yasuo Deguchi, Jay L. Garfield & Graham Priest (2013). The Contradictions Are True—And It's Not Out of This World! A Response to Takashi Yagisawa. Philosophy East and West 63 (3):370-372.
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  32.  78 DLs
    Graham Priest (2009). Vincent F. Hendricks Mainstream and Formal Epistemology. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 60 (2):433-437.
  33.  74 DLs
    Frank Jackson, Graham Priest & David Papineau (2004). David Lewis and Schrödinger's Cat. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 82 (1):153 – 169.
    In 'How Many Lives Has Schrödinger's Cat?' David Lewis argues that the Everettian no-collapse interpretation of quantum mechanics is in a tangle when it comes to probabilities. This paper aims to show that the difficulties that Lewis raises are insubstantial. The Everettian metaphysics contains a coherent account of probability. Indeed it accounts for probability rather better than orthodox metaphysics does.
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  34.  74 DLs
    Graham Priest (1997). Sylvan's Box: A Short Story and Ten Morals. Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 38 (4):573-582.
    The paper contains a short story which is inconsistent, essentially so, but perfectly intelligible. The existence of such a story is used to establish various views about truth in fiction and impossible worlds.
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  35.  73 DLs
    Jan Crosthwaite & Graham Priest (1996). The Definition of Sexual Harassment. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 74 (1):66 – 82.
  36.  73 DLs
    Graham Priest (1984). Logic of Paradox Revisited. Journal of Philosophical Logic 13 (2):153 - 179.
  37.  72 DLs
    Graham Priest, Jc Beall & Bradley P. Armour-Garb (eds.) (2004). The Law of Non-Contradiction : New Philosophical Essays. Oxford University Press.
    The Law of Non-Contradiction - that no contradiction can be true - has been a seemingly unassailable dogma since the work of Aristotle, in Book G of the Metaphysics. It is an assumption challenged from a variety of angles in this collection of original papers. Twenty-three of the world's leading experts investigate the 'law', considering arguments for and against it and discussing methodological issues that arise whenever we question the legitimacy of logical principles. The result is a balanced inquiry into (...)
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  38.  71 DLs
    Graham Priest (2006). A Hundred Flowers. Topoi 25 (1-2):91-95.
    The paper discusses where philosophy is going at the moment. Various current trends are singled out for comment. It then moves to the question of where it ought to be going. After a brief discussion of what this question means, it concludes that no guidance can be given except that each philosopher should pursue what they think to be important.
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  39.  68 DLs
    Bradley Armour-Garb & Graham Priest (2005). Analetheism: A Pyrrhic Victory. Analysis 65 (286):167–173.
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  40.  67 DLs
    Graham Priest (1989). Primary Qualities Are Secondary Qualities Too. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 40 (1):29-37.
    The paper argues for realism in quantum mechanics. Specifically, the formalism of quantum mechanics should be understood as giving a complete description of quantum situations. When it is understood in this way, traditional primary properties of matter can be seen as similar to traditional secondary properties, though at a different level.
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  41.  64 DLs
    Graham Priest & Richard Routley (1984). Introduction: Paraconsistent Logics. Studia Logica 43 (1-2):3 - 16.
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  42.  63 DLs
    Graham Priest, Dialetheism. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    A dialetheia is a sentence, A, such that both it and its negation, A, are true (we shall talk of sentences throughout this entry; but one could run the definition in terms of propositions, statements, or whatever one takes as her favourite truth bearer: this would make little difference in the context). Assuming the fairly uncontroversial view that falsity just is the truth of negation, it can equally be claimed that a dialetheia is a sentence which is both true and (...)
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  43.  63 DLs
    Graham Priest (1994). Is Arithmetic Consistent? Mind 103 (411):337-349.
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  44.  62 DLs
    G. Priest (2011). Jody Azzouni. Talking About Nothing. New York: Oxford University Press, 2010. Isbn 978-0-19-973894-64. Pp. IV + 273. Philosophia Mathematica 19 (3):359-363.
    Our normal discourse is replete with discussion of things which do not exist — the objects of fiction, of illusion and hallucination, of religious worship , of misguided fears and other intentional states. Let us call such discourse empty . How to account for the meaning of empty discourse, and such truth values as its statements have, are perennial and thorny philosophical topics. Many positions are well known; in this book of five chapters Azzouni advocates another. Empty discourse is literally (...)
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  45.  61 DLs
    Graham Priest & Richard Sylvan (1989). Contradiction, Assertion and 'Frege's Point'. Analysis 49 (1):23 - 26.
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  46.  60 DLs
    Graham Priest (2008). Jaina Logic: A Contemporary Perspective. History and Philosophy of Logic 29 (3):263-278.
    Jaina philosophy provides a very distinctive account of logic, based on the theory of ?sevenfold predication?. This paper provides a modern formalisation of the logic, using the techniques of many-valued and modal logic. The formalisation is applied, in turn, to some of the more problematic aspects of Jaina philosophy, especially its relativism.
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  47.  60 DLs
    Graham Priest (2008). Many-Valued Modal Logics: A Simple Approach. Review of Symbolic Logic 1 (2):190-203.
    1.1 In standard modal logics, the worlds are 2-valued in the following sense: there are 2 values that a sentence may take at a world. Technically, however, there is no reason why this has to be the case. The worlds could be many-valued. This paper presents one simple approach to a major family of many-valued modal logics, together with an illustration of why this family is philosophically interesting.
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  48.  59 DLs
    Zach Weber, David Ripley, Graham Priest, Dominic Hyde & Mark Colyvan (2014). Tolerating Gluts. Mind 123 (491):813-828.
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  49.  58 DLs
    Graham Priest (2000). Could Everything Be True? Australasian Journal of Philosophy 78 (2):189 – 195.
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  50.  58 DLs
    Graham Priest (1987). Tense, Tense and Tense. Analysis 47 (4):184 - 187.
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1 — 50 / 252