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Graham Priest [225]G. Priest [24]Graham George Priest [2]
  1. Graham Priest & Greg Restall, Envelopes and Indifference.
    Consider this situation: Here are two envelopes. You have one of them. Each envelope contains some quantity of money, which can be of any positive real magnitude. One contains twice the amount of money that the other contains, but you do not know which one. You can keep the money in your envelope, whose numerical value you do not know at this stage, or you can exchange envelopes and have the money in the other. You wish to maximise your money. (...)
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  2. M. Bryson Brown & Graham Priest (forthcoming). Chunk and Permeate II: Bohr’s Hydrogen Atom. European Journal for Philosophy of Science:1-18.
    Niels Bohr’s model of the hydrogen atom is widely cited as an example of an inconsistent scientific theory because of its reliance on classical electrodynamics together with assumptions about interactions between matter and electromagnetic radiation that could not be reconciled with CED. This view of Bohr’s model is controversial, but we believe a recently proposed approach to reasoning with inconsistent commitments offers a promising formal reading of how Bohr’s model worked. In this paper we present this new way of reasoning (...)
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  3. J. D. Mackenzie & Graham Priest (forthcoming). Paraconsistent Dialogues, or, How to Start Talking to Cretans. Logique Et Analyse.
     
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  4. G. Priest (forthcoming). Review of Absolute Generality. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews.
     
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  5. Graham Priest & Damon Young (eds.) (forthcoming). Martial Arts and Philosophy. Open Court.
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  6. Graham Priest & Damon Young (eds.) (forthcoming). Philosophy and the Martial Arts. Open Court.
  7. Heinrich Wansing & Graham Priest (forthcoming). External Curries. Journal of Philosophical Logic:1-19.
    Curry’s paradox is well known. The original version employed a conditional connective, and is not forthcoming if the conditional does not satisfy contraction. A newer version uses a validity predicate, instead of a conditional, and is not forthcoming if validity does not satisfy structural contraction. But there is a variation of the paradox which uses “external validity” . And since external validity contracts, one might expect the appropriate version of the Curry paradox to be inescapable. In this paper we show (...)
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  8. Graham Priest (2015). Fusion and Confusion. Topoi 34 (1):55-61.
    IntroductionCurry’s paradox is well known.See, e.g., Priest , ch. 6. It comes in both set theoretic and semantic versions. Here we will concentrate on the semantic versions. Historically, these have deployed the notion of truth. Those who wish to endorse an unrestricted T-schema have mainly endorsed a logic which rejects the principle of Absorption, \\models A\rightarrow B\). High profile logics of this kind are certain relevant logics; these have semantics which show how and why this principle is not valid. Of (...)
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  9. Richard Benham, Chris Mortensen & Graham Priest (2014). Chunk and Permeate III: The Dirac Delta Function. Synthese 191 (13):3057-3062.
    Dirac’s treatment of his well known Delta function was apparently inconsistent. We show how to reconstruct his reasoning using the inconsistency-tolerant technique of Chunk and Permeate. In passing we take note of limitations and developments of that technique.
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  10. Francesco Berto & Graham Priest (2014). Modal Meinongianism and Characterization. Grazer Philosophische Studien 90:183-200.
    In this paper we reply to arguments of Kroon (“Characterization and Existence in Modal Meinongianism”. Grazer Philosophische Studien 86, 23–34) to the effect that Modal Meinongianism cannot do justice to Meinongian claims such as that the golden mountain is golden, and that it does not exist.
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  11. Graham Priest (2014). Contradictory Concepts. In Elena Ficara (ed.), Contradictions: Logic, History, Actuality. De Gruyter 13-26.
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  12. Graham Priest (2014). Logical Pluralism: Another Application for Chunk and Permeate. Erkenntnis 79 (2):331-338.
    A motivation behind one kind of logical pluralism is the thought that there are different kinds of objects, and that reasoning about situations involving these different kinds requires different kinds of logics. Given this picture, a natural question arises: what kind of logical apparatus is appropriate for situations which concern more than one kind of objects, such as may arise, for example, when considering the interactions between the different kinds? The paper articulates an answer to this question, deploying the methodology (...)
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  13. Graham Priest (2014). One: Being an Investigation Into the Unity of Reality and of its Parts, Including the Singular Object Which is Nothingness. OUP Oxford.
    Graham Priest presents an original exploration of questions concerning the one and the many. He covers a wide range of issues in metaphysics--unity, identity, grounding, mereology, universals, being, intentionality and nothingness--and draws on Western and Asian philosophy as well as paraconsistent logic to offer a radically new treatment of unity.
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  14. Zach Weber, David Ripley, Graham Priest, Dominic Hyde & Mark Colyvan (2014). Tolerating Gluts. Mind 123 (491):813-828.
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  15. Yasuo Deguchi, Jay L. Garfield & Graham Priest (2013). A Mountain by Any Other Name: A Response to Koji Tanaka. Philosophy East and West 63 (3):335-343.
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  16. Yasuo Deguchi, Jay L. Garfield & Graham Priest (2013). Does a Table Have Buddha-Nature?: A Moment of Yes and No. Answer! But Not in Words or Signs! A Response to Mark Siderits. Philosophy East and West 63 (3):387-398.
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  17. Yasuo Deguchi, Jay L. Garfield & Graham Priest (2013). How We Think Mādhyamikas Think: A Response To Tom Tillemans. Philosophy East and West 63 (3):426-435.
    In his article in this issue, " 'How do Mādhyamikas Think?' Revisited," Tom Tillemans reflects on his earlier article "How do Mādhyamikas Think?" (2009), itself a response to earlier work of ours (Deguchi et al. 2008; Garfield and Priest 2003). There is much we agree with in these non-dogmatic and open-minded essays. Still, we have some disagreements. We begin with a response to Tillemans' first thoughts, and then turn to his second thoughts.Tillemans (2009) maintains that it is wrong to attribute (...)
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  18. Yasuo Deguchi, Jay L. Garfield & Graham Priest (2013). The Contradictions Are True—And It's Not Out of This World! A Response to Takashi Yagisawa. Philosophy East and West 63 (3):370-372.
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  19. Yasuo Deguchi, Jay L. Garfield & Graham Priest (2013). Those Concepts Proliferate Everywhere: A Response to Constance Kassor. Philosophy East and West 63 (3):411-416.
    In this issue, Constance Kassor describes Gorampa's attitude to contradictions as they occur in various contexts of Buddhist pursuit. We agree with much of what she says; with some things we do not.First, some preliminary comments, and a fundamental disagreement. Kassor says:Based on . . . [the assumption that Nāgārjuna has a coherent system of thought] one must resolve apparent contradictions in Nāgārjuna's texts in order to maintain the coherency of his logic. The problem with contradictions is that if they (...)
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  20. Yasuo Deguchi, Jay L. Garfield & Graham Priest (2013). Two Plus One Equals One: A Response to Brook Ziporyn. Philosophy East and West 63 (3):353-358.
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  21. Graham Priest (2013). Indefinite Extensibility—Dialetheic Style. Studia Logica 101 (6):1263-1275.
    In recent years, many people writing on set theory have invoked the notion of an indefinitely extensible concept. The notion, it is usually claimed, plays an important role in solving the paradoxes of absolute infinity. It is not clear, however, how the notion should be formulated in a coherent way, since it appears to run into a number of problems concerning, for example, unrestricted quantification. In fact, the notion makes perfectly good sense if one endorses a dialetheic solution to the (...)
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  22. Graham Priest (2013). Lost in Translation: A Reply to Woodward. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 86 (1):194-199.
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  23. Graham Priest (2013). Nāgārjuna's. Topoi 32 (1):129-134.
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  24. Graham Priest (2013). Nāgārjuna's Mūlamadhyakamakārikā. Topoi 32 (1):129-134.
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  25. Graham Priest (2013). Nāgārjuna's Mūlamadhyakamakārikā. Topoi 32 (1):129-134.
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  26. Graham Priest (2013). Replies. Polish Journal of Philosophy 7 (2):93-108.
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  27. Graham Priest (2013). Three Heresies in Logic and Metaphysics. Polish Journal of Philosophy 7 (2):9-20.
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  28. Graham Priest (2013). The Martial Arts and Buddhist Philosophy. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 73:17-28.
    My topic concerns the martial arts – or at least the East Asian martial arts, such as karatedo, taekwondo, kendo, wushu. To what extent what I have to say applies to other martial arts, such as boxing, silat, capoeira, I leave as an open question. I will illustrate much of what I have to say with reference to karatedo, since that is the art with which I am most familiar; but I am sure that matters are much the same with (...)
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  29. Graham Priest (2013). Vague Inclosures. In Francesco Berto, Edwin Mares, Koji Tanaka & Francesco Paoli (eds.), Paraconsistency: Logic and Applications. Springer 367--377.
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  30. Jc Beall, Ross Brady, J. Michael Dunn, A. P. Hazen, Edwin Mares, Robert K. Meyer, Graham Priest, Greg Restall, David Ripley, John Slaney & Richard Sylvan (2012). On the Ternary Relation and Conditionality. Journal of Philosophical Logic 41 (3):595 - 612.
    One of the most dominant approaches to semantics for relevant (and many paraconsistent) logics is the Routley-Meyer semantics involving a ternary relation on points. To some (many?), this ternary relation has seemed like a technical trick devoid of an intuitively appealing philosophical story that connects it up with conditionality in general. In this paper, we respond to this worry by providing three different philosophical accounts of the ternary relation that correspond to three conceptions of conditionality. We close by briefly discussing (...)
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  31. G. Priest (2012). The Sun May Not, Indeed, Rise Tomorrow: A Reply to Beall. Analysis 72 (4):739-741.
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  32. Graham Priest (2012). Author Meets Critics: On “How Is This Paper Philosophy?”: In the Same Way That This One Is. Comparative Philosophy 3:3-9.
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  33. Graham Priest (2012). Definition Inclosed: A Reply to Zhong. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 90 (4):789 - 795.
    In ?Definability and the Structure of Logical Paradoxes? (Australasian Journal of Philosophy, this issue) Haixia Zhong takes issue with an account of the paradoxes of self-reference to be found in Beyond the Limits of Thought [Priest 1995. The point of this note is to explain why the critique does not succeed. The criterion for distinguishing between the set-theoretic and the semantic paradoxes offered does not get the division right; the semantic paradoxes are not given a uniform solution; no reason is (...)
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  34. Graham Priest (2012). (1.1) in the Same Way That This One Is: Some Comments on Dotson. Comparative Philosophy 3 (2).
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  35. Graham Priest (2012). The Trivial Object and the Non-Uiviality of a Semantically Closed Theory with Descriptions. Journal of Applied Non-Classical Logics 8 (1-2):171-183.
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  36. Graham George Priest (2012). The Bodhisattva's Brain: Buddhism Naturalized. By Owen Flanagan. (Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2011. Pp. Xvi + 264, £19.95.). [REVIEW] Philosophical Quarterly 62 (249):862-864.
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  37. Jc Beall, Graham Priest & Zack Weber (2011). Can U Do That? Analysis 71 (2):280-285.
    In his ‘On t and u and what they can do’, Greg Restall presents an apparent problem for a handful of well-known non-classical solutions to paradoxes like the liar. In this article, we argue that there is a problem only if classical logic – or classical-enough logic – is presupposed. 1. Background Many have thought that invoking non-classical logic – in particular, a paracomplete or paraconsistent logic – is the correct response to the liar and related paradoxes. At the most (...)
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  38. Georges Dreyfus, Bronwyn Finnigan, Jay Garfield, Guy Newland, Graham Priest, Mark Siderits, Koji Tanaka, Sonam Thakchoe, Tom Tillemans & Jan Westerhoff (eds.) (2011). Moonshadows. Conventional Truth in Buddhist Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
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  39. G. Priest (2011). Jody Azzouni. Talking About Nothing. New York: Oxford University Press, 2010. Isbn 978-0-19-973894-64. Pp. IV + 273. Philosophia Mathematica 19 (3):359-363.
    Our normal discourse is replete with discussion of things which do not exist — the objects of fiction, of illusion and hallucination, of religious worship , of misguided fears and other intentional states. Let us call such discourse empty . How to account for the meaning of empty discourse, and such truth values as its statements have, are perennial and thorny philosophical topics. Many positions are well known; in this book of five chapters Azzouni advocates another. Empty discourse is literally (...)
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  40. Graham Priest (2011). Against Against Nonbeing. Review of Symbolic Logic 4 (2):237-253.
    Towards Non-Being develops an account of the semantics of intentional predicates and operators. The account appeals to objects, both existent and non-existent, and worlds, both possible and impossible. This paper formulates replies to a number of the more interesting objections to the semantics that have been proposed since the book was published.
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  41. Graham Priest (2011). Creating Non-Existents. In Franck Lihoreau (ed.), Truth in Fiction. Ontos Verlag
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  42. Graham Priest (2011). First-Order da Costa Logic. Studia Logica 97 (1):183 - 198.
    Priest (2009) formulates a propositional logic which, by employing the worldsemantics for intuitionist logic, has the same positive part but dualises the negation, to produce a paraconsistent logic which it calls 'Da Costa Logic'. This paper extends matters to the first-order case. The paper establishes various connections between first order da Costa logic, da Costa's own Cω, and classical logic. Tableau and natural deductions systems are provided and proved sound and complete.
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  43. Jan Westerhoff, Jay Garfield, Tom Tillemans, Graham Priest, Georges Dreyfus, Sonam Thakchoe, Guy Newland, Mark Siderits, Brownwyn Finnigan & Koji Tanaka (2011). Moonshadows. Conventional Truth in Buddhist Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
    The doctrine of the two truths - a conventional truth and an ultimate truth - is central to Buddhist metaphysics and epistemology. The two truths (or two realities), the distinction between them, and the relation between them is understood variously in different Buddhist schools; it is of special importance to the Madhyamaka school. One theory is articulated with particular force by Nagarjuna (2nd ct CE) who famously claims that the two truths are identical to one another and yet distinct. One (...)
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  44. Graham Priest (2010). A Case of Mistaken Identity. In T. J. Smiley, Jonathan Lear & Alex Oliver (eds.), The Force of Argument: Essays in Honor of Timothy Smiley. Routledge
     
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  45. Graham Priest (2010). Badici on Inclosures and the Liar Paradox. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 88 (2):359-366.
    Badici [2008] criticizes views of Priest [2002] concerning the Inclosure Schema and the paradoxes of self-reference. This article explains why his criticisms are to be rejected.
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  46. Graham Priest (2010). Dominic Hyde, Vagueness, Logic and Ontology. Aldershot: Ashgate, 2008. XII Þ 226 Pp.£ 55. Isbn 978-0-7546-1532-3. [REVIEW] History and Philosophy of Logic 177:184.
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  47. Graham Priest (2010). Hopes Fade for Saving Truth. [REVIEW] Philosophy 85 (1):109-140.
  48. Graham Priest (2010). Inclosures, Vagueness, and Self-Reference. Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 51 (1):69-84.
    In this paper, I start by showing that sorites paradoxes are inclosure paradoxes. That is, they fit the Inclosure Scheme which characterizes the paradoxes of self-reference. Given that sorites and self-referential paradoxes are of the same kind, they should have the same kind of solution. The rest of the paper investigates what a dialetheic solution to sorites paradoxes is like, connections with a dialetheic solution to the self-referential paradoxes, and related issues—especially so called "higher order" vagueness.
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  49. Graham Priest (2010). Logic: A Brief Insight. Sterling Pub..
    Validity : what follows from what? -- Truth functions,or not -- Names and quantifiers : is nothing something? -- Descriptions and existence : did the greeks worship Zeus? -- Self-reference : what is this chapter about? -- Necessity and possibility : what will be must be? -- Conditionals: what's in an if? -- The future and the past : is time real?? -- Identity and change : is anything ever the same? -- Vaguenes : how do you stop sliding down (...)
     
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  50. Graham Priest (2010). Non-Transitive Identity. In Richard Dietz & Sebastiano Moruzzi (eds.), Cuts and Clouds: Vagueness, its Nature, and its Logic. Oxford University Press 406--416.
     
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